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    I know this may seem like a stupid question but I've heard conflicting reports.
    I am interested in computer science but I haven't done computing at A-level. I know this is not a problem when applying for computer science courses but it does mean that I'm less aware of what computer science actually entails. I think that being able to program would be really cool hence why I'm looking into computer science. However does computer science actually contain much programming or is it largely Computer architecture and irrelevant pure maths.
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    At GCSE and a-level we do a lot so I'd imagine that it's the same for computer science, we've been recommended quite a few languages to learn. But don't do a Computer Science degree if you didn't do the a-level, because if you have no prior knowledge of the subject itself you will struggle massively to understand a lot of things, trust me on this one
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    It depends on the uni and specific course. Some uni's are more theoretical while others chose to do more practical units. Although there is usually at leat one programming module that you have to do.
    Don't worry about having the experience for it tho. Fact is that a lot of people come in with no experience or have experience programming in different languages so the lessons usually start from scratch. As long as you have good logic skills you will be fine.
    If you're worried, do some simple online lessons in Java. Most universities chose Java since it's widely used. If you already know which uni you want to go to, check their modules.
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    For AQA GCSE Computer Science its 60% Coursework.
    There are 2 coursework units. These could include coding a game. For GCSE I am doing 1 unit on Scratch and 1 on MIT App Inventor.

    The coursework has a lot of coding in it. So yes. Its 60% coding basically.
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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catego...mputer_science
    I haven't studied all of the areas so I can't say with certainty but a lot of the areas listed involve programming, e.g A.I, Graphics, Security, Software Engineering.

    The other areas that don't involve programming are taught because they are relevant to programming but don't actually involve programming like Algorithms and data structures, Concurrency.

    Some CompSci degrees are more practical others are more theoretical, but regardless of which one it is you will either be learning programming or the theory and knowledge to help you in programming
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    (Original post by BrianMcEgg)
    At GCSE and a-level we do a lot so I'd imagine that it's the same for computer science, we've been recommended quite a few languages to learn. But don't do a Computer Science degree if you didn't do the a-level, because if you have no prior knowledge of the subject itself you will struggle massively to understand a lot of things, trust me on this one
    Actually, it doesn't matter if you haven't done Computing/Computer Science at A-Level. It is not a requirement and from all the universities I have looked at, all of them have said they teach it from the beginning and assume no prior experience with CS. The only important subject is mathematics. CS and/or Physics and Further Maths are just nice to have.
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    Generally yes.
    in the 1st year you will have 20-40 credits of introductory programming. you will have a software engineering course aswell.
    in 2nd year you will have some modules that apply programming. algorithms, operating systems, data structures, networking etc.
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    (Original post by CrazyFool229)
    Actually, it doesn't matter if you haven't done Computing/Computer Science at A-Level. It is not a requirement and from all the universities I have looked at, all of them have said they teach it from the beginning and assume no prior experience with CS. The only important subject is mathematics. CS and/or Physics and Further Maths are just nice to have.
    That wasn't the point, it's much easier if you know the background information. You also don't know how good you are with writing code, because it's very difficult to do if it doesn't come naturally like it has to me and you have loads of other things to focus on. It's do-able, but computer science is a very difficult subject, trust me.
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    (Original post by BrianMcEgg)
    That wasn't the point, it's much easier if you know the background information. You also don't know how good you are with writing code, because it's very difficult to do if it doesn't come naturally like it has to me and you have loads of other things to focus on. It's do-able, but computer science is a very difficult subject, trust me.
    Of course it's easier if you know the background information.... Programming in itself isn't very difficult, the only hard thing is memorising syntax. People shouldn't be discouraged if they haven't done the subject before hand. Someone with further maths is more than capable and logical enough to be able to flourish in a CS degree. You wouldn't discourage somebody from doing electrical engineering if they haven't done the electronics A-Level before hand, would you?
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    (Original post by CrazyFool229)
    Of course it's easier if you know the background information.... Programming in itself isn't very difficult, the only hard thing is memorising syntax. People shouldn't be discouraged if they haven't done the subject before hand. Someone with further maths is more than capable and logical enough to be able to flourish in a CS degree. You wouldn't discourage somebody from doing electrical engineering if they haven't done the electronics A-Level before hand, would you?
    Well no, but I'm not trying to discourage them, I just want them to expect it to be difficult at first so it doesn't take them by surprise. The a-level itself is one of the toughest out there and I got a A at GCSE, people need to be aware of the difficulty of the subject so as said earlier, it doesn't take them by surprise
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    (Original post by BrianMcEgg)
    Well no, but I'm not trying to discourage them, I just want them to expect it to be difficult at first so it doesn't take them by surprise. The a-level itself is one of the toughest out there and I got a A at GCSE, people need to be aware of the difficulty of the subject so as said earlier, it doesn't take them by surprise
    Completely agree, the A-Level itself is hard and rigorous.
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    (Original post by euan_13)
    I know this may seem like a stupid question but I've heard conflicting reports.
    I am interested in computer science but I haven't done computing at A-level. I know this is not a problem when applying for computer science courses but it does mean that I'm less aware of what computer science actually entails. I think that being able to program would be really cool hence why I'm looking into computer science. However does computer science actually contain much programming or is it largely Computer architecture and irrelevant pure maths.
    Yes, there's lots of programming. I imagine the conflicting reports you've heard have been from people arguing against the idea that it's only programming -- some people think they should do a CS degree because they like doing a bit of web development, but don't realise the amount of maths involved.

    Just because you haven't done A-level Computing doesn't mean you can't learn to program independently. If you're considering a CS degree, I think it is highly advisable to have a go at a bit of programming.
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    (Original post by euan_13)
    I know this may seem like a stupid question but I've heard conflicting reports.
    I am interested in computer science but I haven't done computing at A-level. I know this is not a problem when applying for computer science courses but it does mean that I'm less aware of what computer science actually entails. I think that being able to program would be really cool hence why I'm looking into computer science. However does computer science actually contain much programming or is it largely Computer architecture and irrelevant pure maths.
    Other than what has already been said, I would suggest you have a look at course structures at unis you're interested in to get an idea of what you learn on a Comp Sci degree, as well as YouTube. The Maths you learn will all be based on Computation (e.g. linear algebra, numerical methods and such).

    Manchester (scroll down)
    Leeds (scroll down)
    UCL

    I would definitely suggest trying out teaching yourself programming. There are many places online you can learn such as CodeAcademy (I've used it to teach myself JavaScript and Python).
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    (Original post by CrazyFool229)
    OProgramming in itself isn't very difficult, the only hard thing is memorising syntax.
    I'm pretty sure for any programmer, memorising syntax is not going to be hard for them(unless you've literally just started), otherwise all you need is practice
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    (Original post by theBranicAc)
    I'm pretty sure for any programmer, memorising syntax is not going to be hard for them(unless you've literally just started), otherwise all you need is practice
    Yeah sorry, I should have made it clearer. Memorising syntax at the beginning stages is the hard part.
 
 
 
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