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    Hi.
    I have just graduated from Sixth form and is an offer-holder of Cambridge
    University. The course I am pursuing is not law and is another Arts subject.
    I understand that if I want to pursue law in the future, a law conversion will be
    needed (GDL).
    I have heard that GDL, and LPC will be risky and have a low success rate.
    May I ask what is best career path in becoming a qualified solicitor? I am merely making some plans for my future during this summer holiday.
    Furthermore, as I am from Hong Kong, I am likely to return there.

    Thank you very much!
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    About 50% of solicitors took the GDL, so it doesn't have a low success rate at all!

    Stick with Cambridge and take the GDL. You would be in a very strong position, no weaker than someone who took the regular Law undergraduate course at Cambridge.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    About 50% of solicitors took the GDL, so it doesn't have a low success rate at all!

    Stick with Cambridge and take the GDL. You would be in a very strong position, no weaker than someone who took the regular Law undergraduate course at Cambridge.
    Thanks. I do sometimes, doubt if my potential languages Cambridge degree will
    be weaker than the others. When I read some articles regarding to law, they often emphasize the opportunities of an Oxbridge degree. However, I do question that
    if this is relating to Oxbridge Law rather than an Oxbridge Arts degree.
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    Language students are one of the most highly represented group in non-law trainees, not far behind history/politics students.

    You really have nothing to worry about.

    You are going to go the one of the most targeted universities in the world for law. There are only about 300 lawyers per year at Cambridge, so most firms going there are actively trying to recruit the non-lawyers too.


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Language students are one of the most highly represented group in non-law trainees, not far behind history/politics students.

    You really have nothing to worry about.

    You are going to go the one of the most targeted universities in the world for law. There are only about 300 lawyers per year at Cambridge, so most firms going there are actively trying to recruit the non-lawyers too.


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    Thanks. During my 4 years, what preparations will it be best? Do i need law firm placements? What is necessary to maximize my chances?
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    (Original post by nor778)
    Thanks. During my 4 years, what preparations will it be best? Do i need law firm placements? What is necessary to maximize my chances?
    Join the university law society

    Get involved in any extra curricular activities (the ones you want to, it doesn't matter what it is) - take responsibility with them. Do this in Cambridge and on your year abroad.

    Go to careers events

    Speak to the careers service (Cambridge is particularly good)

    Apply for open days/workshops from your first year

    Look for work experience placements, whether work shadowing, vacation scheme, insight programmes, informal placements - it doesn't really matter who with

    Learn to write in a clear and concise manner, not like how you you write assignments/essays for your degree

    Read the business news that's relevant to the area of law you are looking at going into

    If you can, try and get a placement/work experience abroad with a law firm/commercial organisation when you are on your year abroad. This is particularly impressive.


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Join the university law society

    Get involved in any extra curricular activities (the ones you want to, it doesn't matter what it is) - take responsibility with them. Do this in Cambridge and on your year abroad.

    Go to careers events

    Speak to the careers service (Cambridge is particularly good)

    Apply for open days/workshops from your first year

    Look for work experience placements, whether work shadowing, vacation scheme, insight programmes, informal placements - it doesn't really matter who with

    Learn to write in a clear and concise manner, not like how you you write assignments/essays for your degree

    Read the business news that's relevant to the area of law you are looking at going into

    If you can, try and get a placement/work experience abroad with a law firm/commercial organisation when you are on your year abroad. This is particularly impressive.


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    Thanks. This is very helpful. I will do more research into law.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Join the university law society

    Get involved in any extra curricular activities (the ones you want to, it doesn't matter what it is) - take responsibility with them. Do this in Cambridge and on your year abroad.

    Go to careers events

    Speak to the careers service (Cambridge is particularly good)

    Apply for open days/workshops from your first year

    Look for work experience placements, whether work shadowing, vacation scheme, insight programmes, informal placements - it doesn't really matter who with

    Learn to write in a clear and concise manner, not like how you you write assignments/essays for your degree

    Read the business news that's relevant to the area of law you are looking at going into

    If you can, try and get a placement/work experience abroad with a law firm/commercial organisation when you are on your year abroad. This is particularly impressive.


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    Out of interest, may I ask what is the competition per place to secure a training contract? Is it around 3:1 or even more?

    Thank you very much!!
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    (Original post by nor778)
    Out of interest, may I ask what is the competition per place to secure a training contract? Is it around 3:1 or even more?

    Thank you very much!!
    If you mean application numbers per place, one recent survey of graduate recruiters put it at 42 applications per vacancy.

    However law was the third lowest sector in terms of applications per place, with only construction and accountancy lower than that.

    The FMCG sector gets over double what law does, with 109 applications per vacancy.


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    If you mean application numbers per place, one recent survey of graduate recruiters put it at 42 applications per vacancy.

    However law was the third lowest sector, with only construction and accountancy lower than that.

    The FMCG sector gets over double what law does, with 109 applications per vacancy.


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    That is quite a high level of competition! Is the 42 application statistic
    applicable to all types of law firms? Or is it only the Magic circle, silver circle firms?
    In other words, just to secure a training contract, there are 42 applications per place?

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by nor778)
    That is quite a high level of competition! Is the 42 application statistic
    applicable to all types of law firms? Or is it only the Magic circle, silver circle firms?

    Thanks!
    That's across firms who are members of the association of graduate recruiters, so that tends to be the larger commercial firms.

    It will vary considerably though. I know several regional firms that get less than 10 applications per place. However I know another firm who was recruiting one trainee and had over 500 applications.

    With application numbers, law is one of the least competitive industries to get into though. The vast majority of people graduating do not want a career in law, so compared to other industries it could be seen as not very competitive. However, law firms tend to set very high standards, and therefore the competitive aspect of the applications comes in the quality of the application rather than the quantity.


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    That's across firms who are members of the association of graduate recruiters, so that is the larger commercial firms.

    It will vary considerably though. I know several regional firms that get less than 10 applications per place.



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thank you very much. I asked this question because I have read an article 'http://www.lawgazette.co.uk/analysis/features/how-to-get-a-training-contract/5042860.fullarticle' that suggest that with '17,500 law students' , there are 5,000
    training contract places. The success rate, in this case, will be over 28%.

    Edit: Yea, it is true that quality is more important over quantity. Anyway, I think it will be a good
    idea that I concentrate on my language*degree, and hopefully in the first year, be able to boast my successes.
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    (Original post by nor778)
    Thank you very much. I asked this question because I have read an article 'http://www.lawgazette.co.uk/analysis/features/how-to-get-a-training-contract/5042860.fullarticle' that suggest that with '17,500 law students' , there are 5,000
    training contract places. The success rate, in this case, will be over 28%.

    Edit: Yea, it is true that quality is more important over quantity. Anyway, I think it will be a good
    idea that I concentrate on my language (Japanese) degree, and hopefully in the first year, be able to boast my successes.
    It's a really bad way to look at the figures though.

    There might be 17500 law students, but that doesn't take into account the non-law students who can also apply, nor international students (law and non-law) who could also apply.

    Even if you took the 17500 law students, a significant proportion of those will not pursue a career in law. There will also be a proportion who will want to be barristers rather than solicitors.


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    It's a really bad way to look at the figures though.

    There might be 17500 law students, but that doesn't take into account the non-law students who can also apply, nor international students (law and non-law) who could also apply.

    Even if you took the 17500 law students, a significant proportion of those will not pursue a career in law. There will also be a proportion who will want to be barristers rather than solicitors.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Yea. That's true.
    Just used it as a source of reference, in spite of its unreliability.
    It is from this 'http://www.studentladder.co.uk/insights/law-barristers/how-to-become-a-lawyer.html' that it suggest the 3:1 ratio, yet I do think your 42 application per place sounds more likely.
    Thank you for your replies.
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    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by nor778)
    Yea. That's true.
    Just used it as a source of reference, in spite of its unreliability.
    It is from this 'http://www.studentladder.co.uk/insights/law-barristers/how-to-become-a-lawyer.html' that it suggest the 3:1 ratio, yet I do think your 42 application per place sounds more likely.
    Thank you for your replies.
    Can I ask why it matters? Surely if you're considering a career which is competitive not just for entry but to actually stay, competition would be the last thing on your mind?

    Go into it guns blazing.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Can I ask why it matters? Surely if you're considering a career which is competitive not just for entry but to actually stay, competition would be the last thing on your mind?

    Go into it guns blazing.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Yep. Understood.
 
 
 
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