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    Hi, I recently finished A levels in Biology, Physics and Maths. I have heard while not a requirement further maths is very helpful in the first year of a physics degree. I obviously can't learn all of further maths over the summer but I was wondering which sections would be most helpful to learn if I have never done further maths? Maybe M2/M3 or would the pure units (FP1/2) be more helpful?

    Also aside from going over my physics notes is there any physics reading which would aid me in my first year?

    Thanks in advance for any advice
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    Have a look at

    'Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering' Riley, Hobson, Bence

    'University Physics with Modern Physics' Young & Freedman

    You can find both on Amazon (or cheaper secondhand on Ebay) or order them as inter-library loans through your local library.
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    FP2 differential equations should be useful.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    Have a look at

    'Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering' Riley, Hobson, Bence

    'University Physics with Modern Physics' Young & Freedman

    You can find both on Amazon (or cheaper secondhand on Ebay) or order them as inter-library loans through your local library.
    Thanks for this, the maths methods book looks very useful, although its very large, is it designed to aid me throughout my degree? Also is there specific topics that would be helpful in my first year?

    Also the university physics textbook has an older version which is far cheaper, is the newer version a necessity?
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    (Original post by EricPiphany)
    FP2 differential equations should be useful.
    Would I need any knowledge from FP1 before learning this topic? Or is it accessible if I have done core 4?

    Also thank you for this

    Nvm ignore this I have just had a look and it looks to begin where c4 left off so its perfectly accessible. As far as testing my knowledge would doing some FP2 exam questions be useful or are there better exam style questions for further maths?

    Apologies if I ask too many questions, it's just now my exams are finally over I can learn without the pressure which is when I get most done, also I'm a mature student so I really cant afford to fall behind in my first year!
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    (Original post by philo-jitsu)
    Would I need any knowledge from FP1 before learning this topic? Or is it accessible if I have done core 4?

    Also thank you for this

    Nvm ignore this I have just had a look and it looks to begin where c4 left off so its perfectly accessible. As far as testing my knowledge would doing some FP2 exam questions be useful or are there better exam style questions for further maths?

    Apologies if I ask too many questions, it's just now my exams are finally over I can learn without the pressure which is when I get most done, also I'm a mature student so I really cant afford to fall behind in my first year!
    Exam questions are good.
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    (Original post by philo-jitsu)
    Thanks for this, the maths methods book looks very useful, although its very large, is it designed to aid me throughout my degree? Also is there specific topics that would be helpful in my first year?

    Also the university physics textbook has an older version which is far cheaper, is the newer version a necessity?
    Yes, the mathematical methods is to aid you throughout your degree. "Introductory chapters (1-7), matrices, vector calculus, first and higher order ODEs, PDEs and Calculus of variations if you have to do Lagrangian mechanics in first year" should be particularly useful for first year.
    No, newer version of U.Phy is not a necessity. It has bridging problems, which you can't find in older versions. Problems and explanations are similar.
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    (Original post by tangotangopapa2)
    Yes, the mathematical methods is to aid you throughout your degree. "Introductory chapters (1-7), matrices, vector calculus, first and higher order ODEs, PDEs and Calculus of variations if you have to do Lagrangian mechanics in first year" should be particularly useful for first year.
    No, newer version of U.Phy is not a necessity. It has bridging problems, which you can't find in older versions. Problems and explanations are similar.
    Thank you for this, can I just ask, the vector calculus section etc (anything not in preliminary chapters), do you mean try to learn these before starting or throughout? Are these areas that I would know if I had done further maths?
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    (Original post by philo-jitsu)
    Thank you for this, can I just ask, the vector calculus section etc (anything not in preliminary chapters), do you mean try to learn these before starting or throughout? Are these areas that I would know if I had done further maths?
    You might try to learn those chapters before starting if you wish but learning throughout the course is also fine.Though vector algebra is covered in A-levels, vector calculus is not.

    Had you done further maths, you would have learnt most of the materials in preliminary chapters (1-7 of 3rd edition), basic matrix algebra , determinants and inverses of 2X2 and 3X3 matrices, Ordinary Differential Equations, Numerical methods (Chapter 27 of 3rd ed : Sections 27.1, 27.2,27.4), and Statistics. These are the chapters you might want to learn first in order to bridge gap between you and others who took further maths.
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    (Original post by tangotangopapa2)
    You might try to learn those chapters before starting if you wish but learning throughout the course is also fine.Though vector algebra is covered in A-levels, vector calculus is not.

    Had you done further maths, you would have learnt most of the materials in preliminary chapters (1-7 of 3rd edition), basic matrix algebra , determinants and inverses of 2X2 and 3X3 matrices, Ordinary Differential Equations, Numerical methods (Chapter 27 of 3rd ed : Sections 27.1, 27.2,27.4), and Statistics. These are the chapters you might want to learn first in order to bridge gap between you and others who took further maths.
    Perfect, just ordered the book, thanks for this. This was the exact response I was looking for!

    Oh and just one last question (sorry), its probably not relevant for first years, but how much essential is coding/computing ability in physics? Ive heard it is becoming more required especially if you want a career in the subject. I am handy with computers but I have never got into coding/programming, is it worth starting now or will I be taught the basics during my degree?
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    (Original post by philo-jitsu)
    Perfect, just ordered the book, thanks for this. This was the exact response I was looking for!

    Oh and just one last question (sorry), its probably not relevant for first years, but how much essential is coding/computing ability in physics? Ive heard it is becoming more required especially if you want a career in the subject. I am handy with computers but I have never got into coding/programming, is it worth starting now or will I be taught the basics during my degree?
    Yes, use of programming in physics is growing, but I believe you will be given few tutorials on it. Watching tutorials on Mathematica/Matlab would be handy. Also knowing to use LaTeX while writing is always useful. There are tutorials on TSR for this.
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    I would also recommend you to watch some lectures on physics. Here is the one which I think is the best you can find:
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCli..._Fmw/playlists
    Remember, Walter Lewin is a cool professor.
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    (Original post by tangotangopapa2)
    I would also recommend you to watch some lectures on physics. Here is the one which I think is the best you can find:
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCli..._Fmw/playlists
    Remember, Walter Lewin is a cool professor.
    Thanks again, going to have a busy summer!

    Im downloading latex for mac now, is LaTeX the programme that allows people to post maths solutions on the board using all the correct symbols? Do people use laptops for maths at university or is it still predominantly done on paper?
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    I realise this is probably unanswerable as its purely subjective, but on the whole how many hours of study is needed per day/week in order to do well? I would like to try putting in the hours you guys do for a 6 week block over the summer, so it wont be as much of a shock when I finally start studying.

    Obviously I will enjoy my summer, but as a mature student I really cant afford any **** ups (running from a typical 9-5 job) so would like to hit the ground running, plus studying physics over the summer without pressure is fun anyway!
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    (Original post by philo-jitsu)
    Perfect, just ordered the book, thanks for this. This was the exact response I was looking for!

    Oh and just one last question (sorry), its probably not relevant for first years, but how much essential is coding/computing ability in physics? Ive heard it is becoming more required especially if you want a career in the subject. I am handy with computers but I have never got into coding/programming, is it worth starting now or will I be taught the basics during my degree?
    I had a coding module in first year and then you just continue to do more coding but you start to need to write some code to calculate answers...
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    I had a coding module in first year and then you just continue to do more coding but you start to need to write some code to calculate answers...
    Hi, is there a particular language you suggest learning (python etc)? Or does learning one language translate to any of them?
 
 
 
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