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    How does a short sentence, or a simple sentence, create tension or how does it interest the reader?
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    If you think of a short sentence, it's quick and snappy. When someone is tense or panicky, they normally don't speak a lot and if they do, they speak fast in short sentences.
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    (Original post by BrianMcEgg)
    I'm not stupid, this sounds like a question you'd get for homework
    OK, fair enough, but it was not given as my homework. If you're not answering my query, then please stop posting on this thread. It is not necessary.
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    (Original post by sulaimanali)
    If you think of a short sentence, it's quick and snappy. When someone is tense or panicky, they normally don't speak a lot and if they do, they speak fast in short sentences.
    Thank you so much, I did think of that but I didn't know how to put it in words. Much appreciated.

    Yours sincerely,

    Melissa
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    (Original post by melissadh)
    Thank you so much, I did think of that but I didn't know how to put it in words. Much appreciated.

    Yours sincerely,

    Melissa
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    (Original post by melissadh)
    How does a short sentence, or a simple sentence, create tension or how does it interest the reader?
    A minor sentence, such as 'Help.' 'Fascinating.' 'So Quiet.', is purely descriptive and can be used as exclamatory point; so can be used for effect: tension, alarm, awe, or convey some other feeling.

    A simple sentence, which has one verb or clause, makes sense on its own. But by limiting the information, you achieve a dramatic effect such as suspense, intrigue.

    Minor and Simple sentences can also be a structural feature in speech or text. Minor can be used as discourse markers, signposts, such as a teacher introducing a topic in the classroom: 'Enzymes. Who ...', or a suspenseful thriller: 'Chilling. The ...'

    Simple sentences can be used as a statement that is later explained (like in essays), or a dramatic point that intrigues the reader in a text, or a means to convey action etc etc

    There are way too many examples to share.

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    (Original post by BrianMcEgg)
    That's for you to think for yourself, I'm not doing your homework
    She asked this question for help, if you not going to provide any meaningful help, whats the point of being rude?
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    (Original post by mr.purplelambkin)
    A minor sentence, such as 'Help.' 'Fascinating.' 'So Quiet.', is purely descriptive and can be used as exclamatory point; so can be used for effect: tension, alarm, awe, or convey some other feeling.

    A simple sentence, which has one verb or clause, makes sense on its own. But by limiting the information, you achieve a dramatic effect such as suspense, intrigue.

    Minor and Simple sentences can also be a structural feature in speech or text. Minor can be used as discourse markers, signposts, such as a teacher introducing a topic in the classroom: 'Enzymes. Who ...', or a suspenseful thriller: 'Chilling. The ...'

    Simple sentences can be used as a statement that is later explained (like in essays), or a dramatic point that intrigues the reader in a text, or a means to convey action etc etc

    There are way too many examples to share.

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    Thank you, that helps! I will definitely refer to this during my analysis. Do you mind explaining how simple sentences convey actions? I understand, but I would like to explain it further if that makes sense.

    Thank you again, much appreciated.
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    (Original post by melissadh)
    Thank you, that helps! I will definitely refer to this during my analysis. Do you mind explaining how simple sentences convey actions? I understand, but I would like to explain it further if that makes sense.

    Thank you again, much appreciated.
    Hmm to me, this seems a bit obvious so I don't know how I can explain it in more detail. lol As you know, simple sentences only have one clause (one subject + one verb).

    A simple sentence can be passive or active.

    If the agent -- the thing attributed to the verb -- comes before the verb, it is called ACTIVE. For example: 'I stabbed the cake.' Notice there is a sense of immediacy and the action is more easily understood. There is more impact by using the active voice.

    If the agent comes after the verb, it is called PASSIVE. For example: 'The cake was stabbed by me.' Since the agent of the action comes after the verb, there is a sense of obscurity and vagueness. The sentence also carries less impact by using the passive voice.

    Fun fact, a lot of unfortunate letters bearing bad news like eviction notices use the passive. My English teacher pointed it out to us. '... HAVE BEEN asked to leave BY the landlord.' Notice how the delaying of the agent lessens the impact since it all seem a bit politer, less offensive, and sort of obscures who's responsible for the eviction. This technique is used a lot in mystery novels too.

    I don't know what else you want to know. I didn't take English language and I'm omw to study engineering where grammar doesn't even exist. :ahee:
 
 
 
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