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Brexit? How do yo get an Irish passport in case the worst happens? watch

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    I have one Irish born grand parent (deceased) .
    Would that be enough to get me an Irish passport?

    How would I go about proving that he was Irish (I'm not totally
    sure Ireland existed as a country before he left it)...

    Are there rules for this sort of thing?

    I guess, I like millions of others will be wanting to get an Irish passport as an insurance against the worst.

    If anyone knows more detailed rules could you post them..

    And also, how do you, generally speaking get to find out the nationality
    of Grandparents when 120 years ago the world was a very different place.

    Any one know anything about applying for nationality via grandparents?
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    (Original post by FredOrJohn)
    I have one Irish born grand parent (deceased) .
    Would that be enough to get me an Irish passport?

    How would I go about proving that he was Irish (I'm not totally
    sure Ireland existed as a country before he left it)...

    Are there rules for this sort of thing?

    I guess, I like millions of others will be wanting to get an Irish passport as an insurance against the worst.

    If anyone knows more detailed rules could you post them..

    And also, how do you, generally speaking get to find out the nationality
    of Grandparents when 120 years ago the world was a very different place.

    Any one know anything about applying for nationality via grandparents?
    Sorry you most likely won't be able to.

    Plus Britain needs you, somebody will have to replace all the Poles and Irish that had left.
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    (Original post by FredOrJohn)
    I have one Irish born grand parent (deceased) .
    Would that be enough to get me an Irish passport?

    How would I go about proving that he was Irish (I'm not totally
    sure Ireland existed as a country before he left it)...

    Are there rules for this sort of thing?

    I guess, I like millions of others will be wanting to get an Irish passport as an insurance against the worst.

    If anyone knows more detailed rules could you post them..

    And also, how do you, generally speaking get to find out the nationality
    of Grandparents when 120 years ago the world was a very different place.

    Any one know anything about applying for nationality via grandparents?
    You would need to see if you can get registered on the Foreign Births register since it is a grandparent you are claiming your nationality from. Then a passport form. It will be expensive and you will need that grandparent's long form birth certificate.
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    (Original post by Alfissti)
    Sorry you most likely won't be able to.

    Plus Britain needs you, somebody will have to replace all the Poles and Irish that had left.
    I'll still have UK passport (looking for dual nationality)..

    The Irish website says this:

    "
    If one of your grandparents is an Irish citizen who was born in Ireland, but none of your parents was born in Ireland, you may become an Irish citizen. You will need to have your birth registered in the Foreign Births Register – see below.
    "

    My point is if Ireland did not exist way back then can I still be an irish citizen??
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    It depends if you are registered on their birth registry otherwise you're stuck in UK

    Easier to live or registered to be living in Sweden instead to get an EU passport. Won't be cheap though.
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    (Original post by FredOrJohn)
    I'll still have UK passport (looking for dual nationality)..

    The Irish website says this:

    "
    If one of your grandparents is an Irish citizen who was born in Ireland, but none of your parents was born in Ireland, you may become an Irish citizen. You will need to have your birth registered in the Foreign Births Register – see below.
    "

    My point is if Ireland did not exist way back then can I still be an irish citizen??
    What year was he born and when did he die?
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    (Original post by FredOrJohn)
    I have one Irish born grand parent (deceased) .
    Would that be enough to get me an Irish passport?

    How would I go about proving that he was Irish (I'm not totally
    sure Ireland existed as a country before he left it)...

    Are there rules for this sort of thing?

    I guess, I like millions of others will be wanting to get an Irish passport as an insurance against the worst.

    If anyone knows more detailed rules could you post them..

    And also, how do you, generally speaking get to find out the nationality
    of Grandparents when 120 years ago the world was a very different place.

    Any one know anything about applying for nationality via grandparents?
    You can register on the Foreign Births Register (which makes you an Irish citizen) if one of your grandparents was born on the island of Ireland (North or South), it doesn't matter when they were born there. It costs about £250. Once you are registered, you can apply for a passport (which costs an additional £75). Not that expensive and certainly worth doing in the light of Brexit.

    The Irish Embassy explains clearly the process of applying and which documents you need. https://www.dfa.ie/irish-embassy/gre...tration-guide/ and http://www.citizensinformation.ie/en...r_descent.html

    (Original post by Alfissti)
    Sorry you most likely won't be able to.
    This is wrong.

    (Original post by FredOrJohn)
    My point is if Ireland did not exist way back then can I still be an irish citizen??
    Yes.
 
 
 
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