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    Last year I received my GCSE results and did not do very well, or aswell as I would have liked to. I gained 2 A's, majority B's and 2 C's (one being in maths :/ ).

    This was mainly due to me not trying my best, but at Alevels I worked very hard and being honest, found it much easier. All the practice exams leading up I gained A grades in all my subjects (English lit, history, politics and biology). My teachers are also expecting to me to achieve A's this year.

    I am sure I will meet the requirements needed for law, I have also done a handful of work experience and extra curricular activity at school. I will also attempt to write an excellent personal statement.

    Will my GCSE's still lower my chances of getting in, even if I do very well at alevels?
    Any advice is very much appreciated and thank you in advance
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    Hi
    Im going to be very honest, yes your GCSE'S will lower your chance BUT they also care about YOU , so if your inetrview goes well AND u do well in your A-levels u have a good chance.
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    (Original post by Talkand...Talk)
    Hi
    Im going to be very honest, yes your GCSE'S will lower your chance BUT they also care about YOU , so if your inetrview goes well AND u do well in your A-levels u have a good chance.
    Do all law courses require an interview? I was also thinking about studying law with American law, or Law with politics+philosophy. Do you think that it would be easier to get into those courses rather than law on its own?
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    I also heard that Kings College are quite lenient when it comes to GCSE's and that they put more emphasis on your PS and AS results Would that be true in any way?
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    (Original post by starburst12)
    Last year I received my GCSE results and did not do very well, or aswell as I would have liked to. I gained 2 A's, majority B's and 2 C's (one being in maths :/ ).

    This was mainly due to me not trying my best, but at Alevels I worked very hard and being honest, found it much easier. All the practice exams leading up I gained A grades in all my subjects (English lit, history, politics and biology). My teachers are also expecting to me to achieve A's this year.

    I am sure I will meet the requirements needed for law, I have also done a handful of work experience and extra curricular activity at school. I will also attempt to write an excellent personal statement.

    Will my GCSE's still lower my chances of getting in, even if I do very well at alevels?
    Any advice is very much appreciated and thank you in advance
    The simple answer is no. If you have improved this much, the university should look at your application and accept you. This is because you have obviously matured and peaked much more at a later age, which is absolutely fine. I think that Cambridge published an article explaining that progression is good and they don't want people who peak too early (as they are more likely to not progress in university, just sustain their current level). If they look at your application, they should see: GCSE's - weak, A levels - Strong, University - Excellent... They want people to do well in their university and you're the type of applicant who will boost their results! Good luck
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    (Original post by starburst12)
    Do all law courses require an interview? I was also thinking about studying law with American law, or Law with politics+philosophy. Do you think that it would be easier to get into those courses rather than law on its own?
    No i don't think every single uni for law has to have an interview. I think it would be the same requirments, therefore it may be the same a s just going for law. It will just be longer. Not compeltely sure tho, check with someone more profesional lol
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    (Original post by Marshall Taylor)
    The simple answer is no. If you have improved this much, the university should look at your application and accept you. This is because you have obviously matured and peaked much more at a later age, which is absolutely fine. I think that Cambridge published an article explaining that progression is good and they don't want people who peak too early (as they are more likely to not progress in university, just sustain their current level). If they look at your application, they should see: GCSE's - weak, A levels - Strong, University - Excellent... They want people to do well in their university and you're the type of applicant who will boost their results! Good luck
    Thank you so much! This reply has honestly made my day and I agree, everyone matures much more after GCSE's and I definitely have. I have worked very hard throughout this year and the results have been showing, I hope to gain excellent results to meet the entry requirement of A*AA, I will also do some extra work/reading in order to enhance my chances. Thank you again!
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    (Original post by Talkand...Talk)
    No i don't think every single uni for law has to have an interview. I think it would be the same requirments, therefore it may be the same a s just going for law. It will just be longer. Not compeltely sure tho, check with someone more profesional lol
    Thank you for your reply! Yes, I've heard that sometimes interviews are thee only if the course is too competitive or if somebody is borderline of gaining a place. I do think there is an LNAT test though.
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    (Original post by starburst12)
    Thank you for your reply! Yes, I've heard that sometimes interviews are thee only if the course is too competitive or if somebody is borderline of gaining a place. I do think there is an LNAT test though.
    yes thats right. No probs!! Happy to have helped
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    Hi there,

    The truth is that they will matter, but only once other things have been taken into account. Predicted A Levels/IB grades, LNAT, personal statement. King's does not interview for their LL.B. or PPL courses.

    Hope that helps.
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    (Original post by LawTutors)
    Hi there,

    The truth is that they will matter, but only once other things have been taken into account. Predicted A Levels/IB grades, LNAT, personal statement. King's does not interview for their LL.B. or PPL courses.

    Hope that helps.
    If my predicted grades and personal statement is very good, and I also have a load of relevant work experience as well as other activities within school, will my gcse's be slightly excused by any chance? I will also try to very well in the LNAT. Thank you for you reply! it's been very helpful and also do think combined law courses will be easier to get into rather than just LAW alone?
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    (Original post by starburst12)
    If my predicted grades and personal statement is very good, and I also have a load of relevant work experience as well as other activities within school, will my gcse's be slightly excused by any chance?
    Yes, it will definitely help, though note that at KCL as well as other universities the grade requirements have been steadily increasing since 2011 (at which point they had been AAA for a number of years0.

    (Original post by starburst12)
    I will also try to very well in the LNAT.
    That can only help. I think 17 is the international average out of 42. A score about 23 and you should be in good stead. Remember that there are people out there who can tutor you online for the LNAT if you need it. It is a very important test!

    (Original post by starburst12)
    do think combined law courses will be easier to get into rather than just LAW alone?
    Possibly - the PPL at King's has fewer students than the LLB, which I know from personal experience. The other consideration is that it is a four-year course, and so that means more debt if you are going through student finance. If your end goal is to work in law, you should know that many firms recruit 50%+ from outside of law courses.
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    (Original post by LawTutors)
    Yes, it will definitely help, though note that at KCL as well as other universities the grade requirements have been steadily increasing since 2011 (at which point they had been AAA for a number of years0.



    That can only help. I think 17 is the international average out of 42. A score about 23 and you should be in good stead. Remember that there are people out there who can tutor you online for the LNAT if you need it. It is a very important test!



    Possibly - the PPL at King's has fewer students than the LLB, which I know from personal experience. The other consideration is that it is a four-year course, and so that means more debt if you are going through student finance. If your end goal is to work in law, you should know that many firms recruit 50%+ from outside of law courses.
    Thank you, this has been very helpful and i'll keep this in mind when applying and making the choice for my course. If you don't mind me asking, did you study law at kings college?
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    (Original post by starburst12)
    Thank you, this has been very helpful and i'll keep this in mind when applying and making the choice for my course. If you don't mind me asking, did you study law at kings college?
    Yes, as you may have guessed. Feel free to PM me if you have any more questions
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    (Original post by LawTutors)
    Yes, as you may have guessed. Feel free to PM me if you have any more questions
    will do
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    (Original post by LawTutors)
    Yes, it will definitely help, though note that at KCL as well as other universities the grade requirements have been steadily increasing since 2011 (at which point they had been AAA for a number of years0.



    That can only help. I think 17 is the international average out of 42. A score about 23 and you should be in good stead. Remember that there are people out there who can tutor you online for the LNAT if you need it. It is a very important test!



    Possibly - the PPL at King's has fewer students than the LLB, which I know from personal experience. The other consideration is that it is a four-year course, and so that means more debt if you are going through student finance. If your end goal is to work in law, you should know that many firms recruit 50%+ from outside of law courses.
    LNAT 23 is a bit marginal and risky. 25 or 26 will give much better chance.
 
 
 
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