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    I'm considering learning it....just wondering if anyone on here can do it and if they found it easier/harder to learn than an oral language?
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    I've never tried but i think another member called musicboy can do some, but he's away for a few days sadly.
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    I've been thinking about doing this as well. I know musicboy has studied it
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    There are courses to do it at my college but I'm going to be really busy next year as its me second year plus I'm doing a GCSE alongside my course, and have other things to do so I'm not sure, if it's quite easy to pick up I will but if it's going to take alot of concentration I'm better off leaving it or learning it at another time
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    (Original post by britishseapower)
    There are courses to do it at my college but I'm going to be really busy next year as its me second year plus I'm doing a GCSE alongside my course, and have other things to do so I'm not sure, if it's quite easy to pick up I will but if it's going to take alot of concentration I'm better off leaving it or learning it at another time
    I have studied for A levels and also did evening courses as well. It can be done if you plan your time. I loved doing evening courses at my local college. I know a friend of mine did this course along side her a-levels and she found it no problem. If your under 19 you'll get it free so if you find it difficult or time consuming then just drop it.
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    (Original post by britishseapower)
    There are courses to do it at my college but I'm going to be really busy next year as its me second year plus I'm doing a GCSE alongside my course, and have other things to do so I'm not sure, if it's quite easy to pick up I will but if it's going to take alot of concentration I'm better off leaving it or learning it at another time
    Well as i said i'm no expert, but i would imagine it requires a lot of commitment and dedication to learn properly.
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    (Original post by Whats_The_411?)
    I have studied for A levels and also did evening courses as well. It can be done if you plan your time. I loved doing evening courses at my local college. I know a friend of mine did this course along side her a-levels and she found it no problem. If your under 19 you'll get it free so if you find it difficult or time consuming then just drop it.
    I work most weeknights though and do voluntary work at weekends plus I'm learning to drive and have various other things going on so its hard to committ myself to things
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    (Original post by tis_me_lord)
    Well as i said i'm no expert, but i would imagine it requires a lot of commitment and dedication to learn properly.
    Well I just want to learn basics really because I keep serving deaf people at work and I just wish I could communicate with them properly instead of having them write things down or point at stuff
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    (Original post by britishseapower)
    I work most weeknights though and do voluntary work at weekends plus I'm learning to drive and have various other things going on so its hard to committ myself to things
    I was doing all of these last year except learning to drive. I'm telling you it can be done. It isnt everyday. At my college it lasts for one term and you attend twice a week for two / three hours. However, if you are feeling that you would be unable to study this then i suggest that you don't. Anyway best of luck.
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    I think your right, I just need to improve my time management skills, not like completing Grand Theft Auto 3 on X-box is going to benefit my lifestyle greatly
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    BSL1 (first sign language course) doesn't look too complex - I think it's mainly basic words, I'm not sure you have to learn to form sentences.

    I start a course in september and it's 2hrs per week, so not massively time consuming, plus I'm doing it with a friend so we can practice together. I know small bits of it already from what someone once taught me.

    Personally, I think it's a worthwhile activity, plus, if nothing else it's something to put on your personal statement.
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    I intend to learn next year at uni hopefully. I was going to do a course at my local college for free when I did my A Levels but never had time. I do however know the alphabet in sign language, it was very useful for signing messages across the classroom in school
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    Do universities offer courses in sign-language, and do you have to pay for them?
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    (Original post by britishseapower)
    Well I just want to learn basics really because I keep serving deaf people at work and I just wish I could communicate with them properly instead of having them write things down or point at stuff
    I'm interested too, hopefully it'll help with course, and more so when I'm qualified.
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    (Original post by britishseapower)
    I'm considering learning it....just wondering if anyone on here can do it and if they found it easier/harder to learn than an oral language?
    I did an eight week course in British sign language last September which was really good It's not too hard to do the first level certificate - you have to form simple sentences and know a few word groups such as colours and food. You also have to translate a story into sign language but it's not as hard as it sounds! It's a bit easier than GCSE level foreign language in terms of assessment and I found it a lot easier to learn - a lot of signs are pretty easy to remember and the word order is only a little different from oral English.
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    I know the alphabet, but you have to be careful, I learnt some over the interenet when I was younger just to find out it wsa american, but I got my brownie sign language badge!! (*proud* one of two I got!)
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    (Original post by historyhoney)
    I know the alphabet, but you have to be careful, I learnt some over the interenet when I was younger just to find out it wsa american, but I got my brownie sign language badge!! (*proud* one of two I got!)
    Yeah, There seem to be quite a few variation of the alphabet, knocking around.
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    (Original post by historyhoney)
    I know the alphabet, but you have to be careful, I learnt some over the interenet when I was younger just to find out it wsa american, but I got my brownie sign language badge!! (*proud* one of two I got!)
    Yup, ASL (American Sign Language) and BSL (British Sign Language) - from what I've seen of basic ASL it's very different from BSL.
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    (Original post by Bitewing)
    Yeah, There seem to be quite a few variation of the alphabet, knocking around.

    I've been planning to learn BSL for a few years now. I know the alphabet and a few words. I think its fascinating. If you think you can fit it in then go for it, i think you'll find it enjoyable.
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    i'd really love to learn sign language too, but not only british, i'd love to be able to do the french and spanish equivalents aswell.
 
 
 
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