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    Okay, I know there has already been a lot of discussion about this but I'm still really confused.

    I'm graduating from a non-target uni with a physics degree. I have an interest in financial mathematics and want work in the industry before I go for a masters degree. Currently, I'm doing an internship at a high-growth startup where I'm mostly just programming/analysing data etc.

    Now, I have good ECs on my CV but nothing that shows that I know anything about finance. I'm guessing turning up for an interview and saying that I know a lot from this book that I read wouldn't be such a good idea.

    I found this course that's starting soon at the LSE summer school:http://www.lse.ac.uk/study/summerSchools/summerSchool/courses/Finance/FM250.aspx

    It's only an introductory three week course so I know it would't add a lot of 'value' to my CV. But, wouldn't doing this show an initiative and a desire to learn about the subject? Something I can talk about in the interview?

    I know it's expensive but I can afford it. Will it give a me 'rich spoilt kid' image?

    Also, I guess the LSE tag on my CV could attract some attention?
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    I am in the same boat as you. I took advice from people already in IB and PE firms and they said to me its better to get some work experience somewhere within finance than do a summer school. As when and if you get a grad role you would essentially start in a class room. Work experience in finance can be anything like accounting, finance internships at tech companies etc. Work experience is key.

    The LSE tag would attract people to look at your CV but it will be questioned heavily.
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    (Original post by IBFUTURE)
    I am in the same boat as you. I took advice from people already in IB and PE firms and they said to me its better to get some work experience somewhere within finance than do a summer school. As when and if you get a grad role you would essentially start in a class room. Work experience in finance can be anything like accounting, finance internships at tech companies etc. Work experience is key.

    The LSE tag would attract people to look at your CV but it will be questioned heavily.
    Would second this.

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    (Original post by IBFUTURE)
    I am in the same boat as you. I took advice from people already in IB and PE firms and they said to me its better to get some work experience somewhere within finance than do a summer school. As when and if you get a grad role you would essentially start in a class room. Work experience in finance can be anything like accounting, finance internships at tech companies etc. Work experience is key.

    The LSE tag would attract people to look at your CV but it will be questioned heavily.
    The thing is that I COULDN'T get an internship in any financial services firm this summer. I did apply to some last year but couldn't get through the phone interview because I had nothing to say when they asked me about my interest in the industry.

    I went for the startup internship because I had no other option and it was better than doing nothing. I do feel my programming knowledge might attract some attention (especially since I want to get into financial analytics)? Or wouldn't it?

    In that case, squeezing in a summer course on finance could give me something to talk about. As an example, I could answer "Why do you want to work here?" with "I recently spent 3 weeks at LSE studying a course in finance...". What do you think?
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    The problem is that summer schools are cash cows and employers know this. What attracted employers to big brand university names is often the selectivity of the institutions and the difficulty of the work compared to other places. Summer schools are really just learning stuff, so the real value it will give you is actual knowledge and will allow you to know what you're talking about better in interviews, cover letters etc.*
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    Your biggest mistake was not doing any research before a phone interview.
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    There are many websites that can tell you about the industry including this one. You could've just taken points from multiple website and could've had the best answer in the world ready. Questions like "what can you bring" " what are your interests" come up in nearly every interview you will do. I advise you plan, work on interview techniques and read ALOT into finance. I'm sure many people on this forum can help you out with reading materials like mergers and inquisitions.

    * addition*

    The finance summer school syllabus is on the website. You could buy a book which has all the information and save the 2-4K fee
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    (Original post by IBFUTURE)
    There are many websites that can tell you about the industry including this one. You could've just taken points from multiple website and could've had the best answer in the world ready. Questions like "what can you bring" " what are your interests" come up in nearly every interview you will do. I advise you plan, work on interview techniques and read ALOT into finance. I'm sure many people on this forum can help you out with reading materials like mergers and inquisitions.

    * addition*

    The finance summer school syllabus is on the website. You could buy a book which has all the information and save the 2-4K fee
    Thanks for the advice. Are you graduating next year? I'll PM you we can exchange tips when we apply
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    I'm graduating next year but if I don't get any grad roles or internships I will be doing a masters at a high target university (second year Physics mark 82%). I have a verbal offer from UCL and Cambridge just need to do the formal application when I receive a official transcript. But if a grad or internship offer comes through to me I will most definitely accept.


    As for tips I'm not the best person to ask. People who are already in the field of work are the ones to ask. Try network via linkedin and networking fairs and you'll find your advice there. I once "walked" into UBS and by luck spoke to someone who turned out to be a recruiter who gave me some good application advise and also introduced me to one of the associates who was there at the time.

    The reason for the boring story is that for us who are currently at a non target we must work even harder and push the extra mile just so we can be taken even more seriously.
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    (Original post by IBFUTURE)
    I'm graduating next year but if I don't get any grad roles or internships I will be doing a masters at a high target university (second year Physics mark 82%). I have a verbal offer from UCL and Cambridge just need to do the formal application when I receive a official transcript. But if a grad or internship offer comes through to me I will most definitely accept.


    As for tips I'm not the best person to ask. People who are already in the field of work are the ones to ask. Try network via linkedin and networking fairs and you'll find your advice there. I once "walked" into UBS and by luck spoke to someone who turned out to be a recruiter who gave me some good application advise and also introduced me to one of the associates who was there at the time.

    The reason for the boring story is that for us who are currently at a non target we must work even harder and push the extra mile just so we can be taken even more seriously.
    UCL isn't exactly a top university for Physics, though it is a high target. Just make sure you actually want to go there because you know you'll enjoy it there rather than for the sake of being at a target uni.
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    (Original post by Terry Tibbs)
    UCL isn't exactly a top university for Physics, though it is a high target. Just make sure you actually want to go there because you know you'll enjoy it there rather than for the sake of being at a target uni.
    Getting a masters in physics would open more doors for me in more Quantitive roles. UCL Astrophysics masters programme looks very interesting and appealing as well.
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    (Original post by IBFUTURE)
    Getting a masters in physics would open more doors for me in more Quantitive roles. UCL Astrophysics masters programme looks very interesting and appealing as well.
    As far as I know quant roles require PhDs, masters aren't enough.
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    (Original post by Terry Tibbs)
    As far as I know quant roles require PhDs, masters aren't enough.
    I've heard that most firms will hire you if you have the programming/mathematical/data science skills necessary even without a PhD
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    (Original post by IBFUTURE)
    Getting a masters in physics would open more doors for me in more Quantitive roles. UCL Astrophysics masters programme looks very interesting and appealing as well.
    bottom line, always do what you enjoy

    life is too short
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    (Original post by vader9280)
    The thing is that I COULDN'T get an internship in any financial services firm this summer. I did apply to some last year but couldn't get through the phone interview because I had nothing to say when they asked me about my interest in the industry.
    have you ever considered you lack a genuine interest in the financial servcies?
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    (Original post by wasteman shoes)
    have you ever considered you lack a genuine interest in the financial servcies?
    I prefer to look at it as a lack in knowledge, not interest. I know that I can get myself to develop a genuine interest in the industry (and I'm trying to) and that my skills can fit in really well.

    Of course if I had an interest in the financial services from the very beginning, I would not have gone for a degree in physics. People change their interests all the time. I'm sure most of those quants with PhDs in Physics and Maths knew nothing about what a quant even was before they started their PhD. No one in their right mind would go for a PhD in physics to get into financial services.
 
 
 
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