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    I didn't actually do the GDL... I did a university based accelerated LLB for graduates over 2 years. I only achieved a 2:2, although just about scraped 2:1 from a RG uni during my undergrad, with half 2:1 modules and half 2:2 modules with some mitigating circumstances I don't plan on mentioning to law firms due to advice that they don't care about excuses.

    I currently plan to start the LPC in September and wondered how much law firms looked at GDL grades. I am not looking to apply to any major law firms in the silver/magic circle, but perhaps some selective city firms or other. I have some very good extra-curricular activities for my CV having played a high level of sport, and have done some work experience.

    I also may be able to retake some of my LLB exams and try to up it to a 2:1 but not sure if this is worth it as it would delay starting my LPC self-funded and if I was selective in my applications, I'm not sure if firms would look at conversion grades over the first degree. I am 24 this summer, so don't want to delay the LPC too much longer.

    Anyone got any insight as to how much the post-grad LLB conversion grade of a 2:2 will hold me back?

    Thanks.
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    Not sure who gave you the advice about the mitigating circumstances - it seems a bit too much of an over generalisation to be the right advice though. It really depends what the mitigating circumstances are. If it is a legitimate excuse, they can be quite open minded to them and will take them into consideration.

    You don't have the GDL so I am not sure why you are asking about it. However, like the GDL they will look at the LLB grades as closely as they would your undergraduate degree grades. Some firms may even look at them more closely where they want to see how well you did in key law modules (usually contract and tort).

    If you take out the mitigating circumstances (like you are suggesting), my concern based of what you have said would be that it sounds like the majority of your combined UG and LLB grades are a 2.2 rather than a 2.1. If you don't disclose the mitigating circumstances, many firms may just think you are not up to the expected or that you just don't meet the same standard as the other applicants.

    Anyone with grades not up to the usual 2.1 standards (and no mitigating circumstance) will need an exceptionally good application form. Strong work experience and extra curriculars, plus very strong career motivation and a exceptionally well written form. Any of that slips slightly and you are already on the back foot with your academics so it probably will be a no. It is possible and I've seen enough people who have done it, but they usually have significant work experience (most likely through paralegal work) or extra ordinary extra curriculars (representing your country in sport etc) and the rest of their application is very persuasive and well written.

    Also the retakes may only help a little. Most firms will ask you to disclose your grades on the first sitting.

    Feel free to PM me if you want to discuss the disclosure of the mitigating circumstances further. I can give you insight into how recruiters would view them m.


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Not sure who gave you the advice about the mitigating circumstances - it seems a bit too much of an over generalisation to be the right advice though. It really depends what the mitigating circumstances are. If it is a legitimate excuse, they can be quite open minded to them and will take them into consideration.

    You don't have the GDL so I am not sure why you are asking about it. However, like the GDL they will look at the LLB grades as closely as they would your undergraduate degree grades. Some firms may even look at them more closely where they want to see how well you did in key law modules (usually contract and tort).

    If you take out the mitigating circumstances (like you are suggesting), my concern based of what you have said would be that it sounds like the majority of your combined UG and LLB grades are a 2.2 rather than a 2.1. If you don't disclose the mitigating circumstances, many firms may just think you are not up to the expected or that you just don't meet the same standard as the other applicants.

    Anyone with grades not up to the usual 2.1 standards (and no mitigating circumstance) will need an exceptionally good application form. Strong work experience and extra curriculars, plus very strong career motivation and a exceptionally well written form. Any of that slips slightly and you are already on the back foot with your academics so it probably will be a no. It is possible and I've seen enough people who have done it, but they usually have significant work experience (most likely through paralegal work) or extra ordinary extra curriculars (representing your country in sport etc) and the rest of their application is very persuasive and well written.

    Also the retakes may only help a little. Most firms will ask you to disclose your grades on the first sitting.

    Feel free to PM me if you want to discuss the disclosure of the mitigating circumstances further. I can give you insight into how recruiters would view them m.


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    Thanks a lot for the response.

    I was both ill and had worsened mental health problems during exams this summer. In contract, I achieved a poor 48 last year but got 60 in torts this year. 2/6 modules this year, I achieved an abysmal scraped pass in the low 40s, entirely due to the mitigating circumstances. In terms of extra-curricular, I did come close to representing the country at sport. If first-attempt resits aren't seen as such, then that would put me off applying/appealing as it would delay me starting the LPC. I may have to consider disclosing the mitigating circumstances if it gives me a better chance.


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    (Original post by ZolaCFC25)
    Thanks a lot for the response.

    I was both ill and had worsened mental health problems during exams this summer. In contract, I achieved a poor 48 last year but got 60 in torts this year. 2/6 modules this year, I achieved an abysmal scraped pass in the low 40s, entirely due to the mitigating circumstances. In terms of extra-curricular, I did come close to representing the country at sport. If first-attempt resits aren't seen as such, then that would put me off applying/appealing as it would delay me starting the LPC. I may have to consider disclosing the mitigating circumstances if it gives me a better chance.


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    Mental health is a difficult one when it comes to disclosing mitigating circumstances, particularly if it is fairly recent. It's not that people will see it as an excuse (anything but). It's more whether there is a question on whether going into a extremely high pressured and volatile working environment is going to be right for you at that time.

    I'm not saying you shouldn't resit. In fact doing so may show the resilience and determination to succeed that many firms will look for in candidates (and you could spin it as such).


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Mental health is a difficult one when it comes to disclosing mitigating circumstances, particularly if it is fairly recent. It's not that people will see it as an excuse (anything but). It's more whether there is a question on whether going into a extremely high pressured and volatile working environment is going to be right for you at that time.

    I'm not saying you shouldn't resit. In fact doing so may show the resilience and determination to succeed that many firms will look for in candidates (and you could spin it as such).


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    Thanks again for the response.

    I gathered that it would have a negative effect of some sort. What I wasn't expecting was that 'first attempt resits' wouldn't actually count as such to law firms. Would I not be able to list down the resits as first attempts, given that that is what the university calls them?
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    If the university has deemed them as first attempts and there's no evidence on your transcripts that they are resits, then yes.


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    Found it hard to get my head round. You have done a first degree in? Where you got a 2:2?
    You then did an LLB where you got a 2:2.
    Why are you asking about the GDL?
    You are about to do the LPC?

    What JSP said mental health is a very difficult one. In some circumstances you can say look I didnt do as well as I could have because of reason X, which might explain it, but its also a weakness. As JSP indicated Law can be a very pressurised environment and they have to be sure you have the aptitude to deal with it.

    If you can resit and arent capped, then i would do it, especially if you were close. Normally resits are capped, though.

    If you are slef funding your LPC, then i'd think long and hard about getting into further debt.
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    you're going to have to be really smart in where you apply. Don't apply to big firms, it will be a waste of time. they will bin your application immediately because they have a ton of others going for the same spot and unfortunately having the wrong number at the end of your degree is career suicide.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    If the university has deemed them as first attempts and there's no evidence on your transcripts that they are resits, then yes.


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    This is the case. Fingers crossed!

    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Found it hard to get my head round. You have done a first degree in? Where you got a 2:2?
    You then did an LLB where you got a 2:2.
    Why are you asking about the GDL?
    You are about to do the LPC?

    What JSP said mental health is a very difficult one. In some circumstances you can say look I didnt do as well as I could have because of reason X, which might explain it, but its also a weakness. As JSP indicated Law can be a very pressurised environment and they have to be sure you have the aptitude to deal with it.

    If you can resit and arent capped, then i would do it, especially if you were close. Normally resits are capped, though.

    If you are slef funding your LPC, then i'd think long and hard about getting into further debt.
    I got a 2:1 in my first degree, but only just. My resits in 5 weeks will be classified as first attempt, if my appeal succeeds. I passed everything but did poorly in two heavily affected modules in particular which meant my overall was a 2:2.

    I asked about the GDL, because that is the route most people take. I did an accelerated LLB instead. Both are qualifying law degrees, in effect, whilst the GDL is the more common route, hence why I asked about that.

    (Original post by Duncaaaaaan)
    you're going to have to be really smart in where you apply. Don't apply to big firms, it will be a waste of time. they will bin your application immediately because they have a ton of others going for the same spot and unfortunately having the wrong number at the end of your degree is career suicide.
    I don't intend on applying to any big firms, even if I get a 2:1 after a resits. I don't think my modules are high enough. Hopefully the 2:1s and strong extracurriculars will give me hope.
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    I'd say sue the university for inflicting emotional distress, trash them as much as you can until they disappear from the market, get your money back and then think off where the actual problem was. They tend to get off on trashing students to show them 'ho they are'.Mrrrr.. Big & scarry :-) LoL .Trash them well just like they trashed you, check if it's really because you did not study enough or because they haven't actually taught you anything. If any fraud going on you knew were to go LOL welllooked after
 
 
 
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