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    Hey guys, so I received my 2nd year results today, which were:
    • EU law (15 credits) = 69%
    • Admin law (15 credits) = 67%
    • Tort, Equity & Trusts and Evidence (all 30 credits) = 64%
    I don't think these are bad - they're all mid-high 2:1s. But, I thought a first might be nice.

    However, I made a fairly big mistake. I thought if I crammed hard enough (which I did), I could sit back for most of the year, and still get top marks. Granted, this hasn't got me bad results. But I'm slightly disappointed I didn't do better. Still, this is easy to say with hindsight - in the moment, I had no idea.

    The way my law school works is that if you get firsts in 90 credits, over the final two years (240 credits in total), you'll get a first overall. So I can still get 3 firsts next year, and get a first overall.

    Also my roommate got two firsts - one in equity & trusts (30 credits), one in EU law (15 credits). She worked really hard in trusts, much more than me, and she fully deserves it. With EU, I basically screwed up my coursework, which brought me down to 69% overall.

    So, now that the initial shock is over, my thoughts are:
    • Work as hard as I can throughout the whole of final year - not just during revision!
    • I'm slightly disappointed (maybe 70% happy 30% disappointed), but above all, I'm glad I learned a valuable lesson to not be complacent in any way
    • Don't compare my results to anyone else, especially my roommate's!
    • (My roommate deserved her grades anyway)
    Does anyone have any other general thoughts or comments? I've had really bad results, and really good results, but never ones which are neither great nor bad - so I'm not sure how to respond to them.

    You don't have to do undergrad law. This is a very general question.
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    (Original post by GeorgeBradford)
    Hey guys, so I received my 2nd year results today, which were:
    • EU law (15 credits) = 69%
    • Admin law (15 credits) = 67%
    • Tort, Equity & Trusts and Evidence (all 30 credits) = 64%
    I don't think these are bad - they're all mid-high 2:1s. But, I thought a first might be nice.

    However, I made a fairly big mistake. I thought if I crammed hard enough (which I did), I could sit back for most of the year, and still get top marks. Granted, this hasn't got me bad results. But I'm slightly disappointed I didn't do better. Still, this is easy to say with hindsight - in the moment, I had no idea.

    The way my law school works is that if you get firsts in 90 credits, over the final two years (240 credits in total), you'll get a first overall. So I can still get 3 firsts next year, and get a first overall.

    Also my roommate got two firsts - one in equity & trusts (30 credits), one in EU law (15 credits). She worked really hard in trusts, much more than me, and she fully deserves it. With EU, I basically screwed up my coursework, which brought me down to 69% overall.

    So, now that the initial shock is over, my thoughts are:
    • Work as hard as I can throughout the whole of final year - not just during revision!
    • I'm slightly disappointed (maybe 70% happy 30% disappointed), but above all, I'm glad I learned a valuable lesson to not be complacent in any way
    • Don't compare my results to anyone else, especially my roommate's!
    • (My roommate deserved her grades anyway)
    Does anyone have any other general thoughts or comments? I've had really bad results, and really good results, but never ones which are neither great nor bad - so I'm not sure how to respond to them.

    You don't have to do undergrad law. This is a very general question.
    Hi, I graduated with a first in law. Scoring well is not really about working hard. It's about smart study. It's about being passionate about the law, understanding it and knowing how to explain and to apply it accurately.

    My worst subject ever at law school was torts (63%) because I simply didn't like the subject. Contrast this with contracts (77%), my favourite compulsory subject, which I found really interesting. Therefore, choose law electives that you'll enjoy! My highest mark was 84% in an elective that I liked (human rights law).

    You usually don't need to make your own notes, as this is a waste of time. I usually don't even highlight or underline my books. All you need to do is to read and to absorb what you read.

    Listen carefully when your tutor/lecturer teaches you the law. Ask questions if you don't understand.

    Practise past exam papers. Practice makes perfect!

    That's all you need to do to get a first in law.
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    (Original post by jessjanellbhons1)
    You usually don't need to make your own notes, as this is a waste of time. I usually don't even highlight or underline my books. All you need to do is to read and to absorb what you read.

    Listen carefully when your tutor/lecturer teaches you the law. Ask questions if you don't understand.

    Practise past exam papers. Practice makes perfect!

    That's all you need to do to get a first in law.
    Each person is different and we respond to learning techniques differently. Just because taking notes wasn't for you doesn't mean it won't be for other people.
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    (Original post by jessjanellbhons1)
    Hi, I graduated with a first in law. Scoring well is not really about working hard. It's about smart study. It's about being passionate about the law, understanding it and knowing how to explain and to apply it accurately.

    My worst subject ever at law school was torts (63%) because I simply didn't like the subject. Contrast this with contracts (77%), my favourite compulsory subject, which I found really interesting. Therefore, choose law electives that you'll enjoy! My highest mark was 84% in an elective that I liked (human rights law).

    You usually don't need to make your own notes, as this is a waste of time. I usually don't even highlight or underline my books. All you need to do is to read and to absorb what you read.

    Listen carefully when your tutor/lecturer teaches you the law. Ask questions if you don't understand.

    Practise past exam papers. Practice makes perfect!

    That's all you need to do to get a first in law.
    Hey, thanks for the reply, it's super helpful to hear that from someone who got a first!The modules I've enjoyed the most so far have been public law-related (EU 69%, Admin 67%, Constitutional 65%) and criminal-related (Criminal 67%, Evidence 64%). In contrast, the ones I've hated the most were property-related (Land 63%, Equity 64%) and contract (61%) - no offense!

    But, looking back now, what I really neglected was getting completely 'stuck in' and passionate about those subjects I liked. I enjoyed them, but didn't do any extra work, which I might have not minded. Contrast this to my roommate, who really liked Equity & Trusts, and although she found it boring at times, she was able to do all the extra reading. She also had a great tutor which really helped. So is this the kind of thing which makes the most difference? Enthusiasm, rather than diligence? (Although I'm guessing you need some of both)

    Perhaps my desire to 'work hard' comes from that I've been doing all compulsory modules so far, most of which have been fairly dry. Maybe it'll be easier once I can choose subjects I really like.Another big thing which I didn't do was listen carefully and ask questions. But that was down to pure laziness/arrogance on my part, thinking I could do the reading during revision, and be fine. I therefore fell behind very quickly. And although that approach allowed me to do well, it's perhaps not as well as I would have liked. However, if I can really get enthusiastic about the subjects on my year abroad (this year) and my final year, should this hopefully solve that problem too?

    (I'm not the kind of person who can learn without notes though. But learning styles are different, there's no single best way for everyone.)
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    I'm studying an LLM now but got my LLB in 2014. My LLB grades in the end were quite similar to yours, once rounded up, but throughout the 4 years they were hit and and miss (sometimes getting 1sts, sometimes 2:1s sometimes 2:2s). I have now learned my lesson and am track for a Distinction. Once you have figured out which technique works best for you, you're sorted. I don't take notes anymore because it makes it harder to enjoy the lecture, listen to what is being said and engage in discussion of the topic at hand. Granted, Admin law isn't the most enjoyable subject for me (though I always liked EU and Tort law), what I do with subjects like that is play e-lectures over, and over again until they are pretty much stuck in my head. Past paper practice and sample coursework have been extremely helpful too.
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    At least now you know that cramming only works to some extent meaning next year you'll be more prepared and will likely to a lot better.
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    (Original post by WBZ144)
    I'm studying an LLM now but got my LLB in 2014. My LLB grades in the end were quite similar to yours, once rounded up, but throughout the 4 years they were hit and and miss (sometimes getting 1sts, sometimes 2:1s sometimes 2:2s). I have now learned my lesson and am track for a Distinction. Once you have figured out which technique works best for you, you're sorted. I don't take notes anymore because it makes it harder to enjoy the lecture, listen to what is being said and engage in discussion of the topic at hand. Granted, Admin law isn't the most enjoyable subject for me (though I always liked EU and Tort law), what I do with subjects like that is play e-lectures over, and over again until they are pretty much stuck in my head. Past paper practice and sample coursework have been extremely helpful too.
    I see, that's actually really encouraging. Especially because my year abroad next year won't count towards the overall classification (unless it's a borderline case), so I have a whole year to really nail my learning methods, and learn from any more mistakes if I make any.

    Personally, I find taking notes in a lecture is more helpful than sitting there and just listening - but again, each to their own.

    (Original post by fefssdf)
    At least now you know that cramming only works to some extent meaning next year you'll be more prepared and will likely to a lot better.
    Haha, definitely! In my first year, I got 64% overall. That doesn't mean I didn't work harder this year during revision - boy, I did (about twice as much). But I was not prepared in any way for the step up.

    For example, I remember one time that my criminal law tutor was asked what you need to write to get a high 2:1. He said there was an essay question last year covered in two pages of the textbook, and if you recited that, you'd get a very good mark. Can't say that was the same this year. Now that wasn't the only reason why I didn't improve much this year, but it was probably one of them. The overall effect was that I was complacent, and just thought I could do the same process, but more intensively, and it would work.

    Of course, this is all really easy to say with hindsight. I'll admit I screwed up, but perhaps I'm blaming myself more than I should, since I had little idea at the time. But hey, hindsight is also great for making you learn and get better. I'll try a solid work/life balance throughout the whole year next year (instead of doing little work, then cramming harder), and if it's not perfect, there's time to adjust it to be that way in my 4th year!
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    (Original post by jessjanellbhons1)
    Hi, I graduated with a first in law. Scoring well is not really about working hard. It's about smart study. It's about being passionate about the law, understanding it and knowing how to explain and to apply it accurately.

    My worst subject ever at law school was torts (63%) because I simply didn't like the subject. Contrast this with contracts (77%), my favourite compulsory subject, which I found really interesting. Therefore, choose law electives that you'll enjoy! My highest mark was 84% in an elective that I liked (human rights law).

    You usually don't need to make your own notes, as this is a waste of time. I usually don't even highlight or underline my books. All you need to do is to read and to absorb what you read.

    Listen carefully when your tutor/lecturer teaches you the law. Ask questions if you don't understand.

    Practise past exam papers. Practice makes perfect!

    That's all you need to do to get a first in law.
    Hey, what uni did you attend?
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    (Original post by gman10)
    Hey, what uni did you attend?
    Hi, just to be a bit mysterious, I'll only disclose that I attended a university ranked in the top 15 in the world according to this ranking: http://www.topuniversities.com/unive...-legal-studies

    I just prefer to remain anonymous online, and I think my identity might be revealed if I disclosed my uni! But there aren't that many universities in the top 15, so you may be able to guess which one it is after all!
 
 
 
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