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    Hello physicists,

    If you're doing/have done physics at A-Level or above, me and The Learn Ranger want to know why you picked it, and what you love about it.

    You don't have to write loads, but we thought up a few questions to get you going :parrot:


    What does physics involve?

    How does A-Level differ from GCSE?

    How are you assessed?

    What skills have you developed?

    What does doing physics lead to, either in careers or further education?

    Do you have any advice for people thinking of picking physics?

    Feel free to answer as many or as little questions as you like. We're thinking about writing a little guide to particular subjects - if we use any of your answers you will be credited
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    (Original post by Fox Corner)
    Hello physicists,

    If you're doing/have done physics at A-Level or above, me and The Learn Ranger want to know why you picked it, and what you love about it.

    You don't have to write loads, but we thought up a few questions to get you going :parrot:


    What does physics involve?

    How does A-Level differ from GCSE?

    How are you assessed?

    What skills have you developed?

    What does doing physics lead to, either in careers or further education?

    Do you have any advice for people thinking of picking physics?

    Feel free to answer as many or as little questions as you like. We're thinking about writing a little guide to particular subjects - if we use any of your answers you will be credited

    What doesn't Physics involve!

    A Level is obviously a lot harder, as there is a lot more to learn. You have to understand the material a lot more rather than just remember things.

    I was assessed with practical experiments (the EMPAs) and four written papers (one EMPA and two written papers for AS and the same for A2). However this has changed since last year and students no longer do EMPAs.

    It's definitely taught me to think more critically about things. Also my practical skills have improved greatly as a lot of experiments were done during my course.

    Physics can lead to many careers which don't necessarily have much to do with Physics. I have been told by many people that the skills developed by doing Physics are very much wanted by many employers. There are also the physics/maths related jobs. For example I want to be a Physics professor and researcher at a university.

    I think I would advise everyone who wants to do A Level Physics to study A Level Maths. If you want a career in Physics/want to do it at university then I would urge people to do Further Maths as well. From what I've heard from professors and seen online, Physics is incredibly mathematical at university.
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    (Original post by Fox Corner)
    Hello physicists,

    If you're doing/have done physics at A-Level or above, me and The Learn Ranger want to know why you picked it, and what you love about it.

    You don't have to write loads, but we thought up a few questions to get you going :parrot:


    What does physics involve?

    How does A-Level differ from GCSE?

    How are you assessed?

    What skills have you developed?

    What does doing physics lead to, either in careers or further education?

    Do you have any advice for people thinking of picking physics?

    Feel free to answer as many or as little questions as you like. We're thinking about writing a little guide to particular subjects - if we use any of your answers you will be credited
    What does physics involve?
    Physics is the study of nature. So, physics involves everything you see in nature. Let me quote a saying by physicist Michio Kaku.
    " What has physics done for me lately? I mean, do I get better color television, do I get better internet reception with physics?” And the answer is yes. You see, physics is at the very foundation of matter and energy. We physicists invented the laser beam, we invented the transistor. We helped to create the first computer. We helped to construct the internet. We wrote the World Wide Web. In addition, we also helped to invent television, radio, radar, microwaves, not to mention MRI scans, PET scans, x-rays. In other words, almost everything you see in your living room, almost everything you see in a modern hospital, at some point or other, can be traced to a physicist."

    For the prospects of physics. Please refer to the following website: https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-...degree/physics

    I don't know much about GCSEs but A level physics is designed to shape your thinking towards the way physicist do. It involves knowledge of working with simple equations and mostly critical thinking.

    Most of the mathematics is cut-off and you don't have to know the derivation of tons of equations, though as has been stated earlier studying physics alongside mathematics and further mathematics is highly recommended.

    Assessment goes like this. You have to do 2 written papers for each AS and A2 and there are list of core practicals you have to complete (new syllabus).

    To the people thinking of picking physics, I would say : "Learning to enjoy physics is essential. Have a receptive mindset. Try as far as possible to be ahead of class, if you want to succeed in physics."

    Oh, and I forgot to mention. You might have heard about black holes, worm holes, pulsars, blazars, quazars, time dilation, length contraction, mass expansion, space-time, higher dimensions, dark matter, anti-matter, quantum entanglement, matter-wave duality, ultimate speed is the speed of light and much more. You get to learn about these things in detail if you continue studying physics.
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    What does physics involve?
    Everything. From the smallest things we know of to the biggest things we know of.

    How does A-Level differ from GCSE?
    The content is twice as hard (especially A2) and it isn't sufficient to simply just memorise things and spit them on the exam paper in a parrot fashion like you could at GCSE. Most of the A Level content was more interesting than GCSE though.
    How are you assessed?
    I have just finished my A Levels so it was the 4 exam papers, 2 ISAs/EMPAs structure....I've looked at some new spec stuff though and I do not envy current year 12s at all
    What skills have you developed?
    Mostly my thought processes on tackling any type of question, especially mathematically based ones.
    Also a lot of six markers in past papers on my A Level spec were describing how to carry out specific practicals. As a person who usually just likes to follow instructions word for word (in case I mess up), I think they've contributed to how I now apply myself in practical situations. Which I assume will be good degree practice.

    What does doing physics lead to, either in careers or further education?
    Physics is desirable in a lot of STEM just generally. Whether it is directly linked to that specific stem career or not.
    A lot of degree level Engineering courses require you to have done A Level physics. Even then, if they don't require physics it's bound to pop up...I'll be doing Chemical Engineering which doesn't specifically ask for an A Level in physics but I imagine the thermodynamics we did in unit 5 will be very useful! It is a respectable qualification to have because obviously it's quite hard and I imagine it will have some pretty good uses outside of stem too. It shows you can think logically.
    Do you have any advice for people thinking of picking physics?
    Only do it if you want to, it should be something you enjoy and not something seen as a heavy burden that you pocked because it's 'hard'.
    Also if this is A Level, then you'd be silly not to do A Level Maths in addition to physics, your maths skills improve so much and it's such a good supporting A Level (and maths is pretty great too).
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    I apologise that my response won't be as long as the two guys above, but I'm going to choose to do A level Physics as one of my 3 A levels. I'm choosing it because I saw some A2 content and couldn't stop reading about it and watching videos about the content. Also because I feel silly to do Biology and Chemistry without doing Physics as well.
 
 
 
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