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    (Original post by Squishy)
    I don't think a truly "photographic memory" exists. It would be rather frightening if it did actually, because you'd be able to remember embarrassing moments in excruciating detail. I think the technical term for remembering images well is eidetic memory. Look it up though, it's an interesting subject.

    Pornographic memories are much more common...
    Thanks, I'll look at that
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    (Original post by DazYaTTT)
    Shame.....
    indeed, but there will be other days
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    my old history teacher/ dep head told of a friend who could memories ~50 pages of a textbook just by looking. then recite. bizarre!
    i spose its a bit like mozart, hearing the music once then writing it down afterwards!
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    It's believed that a photographic memory doesn't generally exist. Maybe this autistic thing does, but there's not really any evidence that some people's minds work in that way.. just do a google for photographic memory

    Most memory feats like that use association between items or imagery that stands out in your mind causing it to stick in your memory
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    (Original post by _EMMA_)
    indeed, but there will be other days
    maybe
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    (Original post by Do Chickens Fly)
    It does exist, but not the way people suggest it does.

    Some people, particular forms of autistic savages, lack the ability to filter relevant from irrelevant information - be it visual, phonographic, or perhaps even sensual. It has been noted, some with this 'ability' in the visual field, can recall images with perfect precision, and can produce a (practically) identical replica from memory if asked to. However, these same people suffer from the most severe forms of autism.

    Within the normal population, however, I doubt it is present. Even if it was - it isn't exactly film-strip memory - the amount of data involved would quickly exceed the capacity of our memories. We need to filter and forget things in order to avoid becoming overwhelmed with information, as found with some autistic people. Some people do have very good, natural, untrained memories and have better recall of images and sounds than others, but it comes nowhere near photographic.
    By the way, they're referred to as 'autistic savants', NOT 'savages'.

    Peace

    John
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    To those who argue that photographic memories don't exist, they do. In addition, there's no way you can become overwhelmed with information from having a photographic/eidetic memory. When you revise, you CHOOSE to remember things. Likewise for those who have photographic memories.

    My Chemistry teacher mentioned that in 25 years of teaching, he has met TWO people with photographic memories (both A level B grade students). Being able to photographically remember text does not guarantee understanding. Understanding is the process of overcoming confusion; it takes time.

    Through training my memory I have been able to develop what I call a 'part-photographic' memory. I have no problem remembering numbers, no matter how long, remembering pages of text..etc. But then I only remember stuff WHEN I WANT TO. My brain doesn't automatically absorb the crap I don't want or need. How do I apply this to revision. I understand the stuf (which takes a bit more time) then apply the memory technqiues. Voila! Now, whenever I picture that page in my mind, I know AND understand what was on it.

    I have been using mnemonics for about four years now but got really desperate during exam time. I would definitely recommend mnemonics. POWERFUL! The thing is with time they work on 'auto-pilot'. You have reached unconsious competence level where u don't need to forcefully apply the memory techniques for them to work. You sorta tell urself, yea brain remember that and it sticks.

    For those of you who wanna test this stuff out, I would recommend Mega Memory by Kevin Trudeau and Tony Buzan Books, Use your Head and Use your Memory. These techniques are difficult to apply AT FIRST..but trust me, the payoff is great!!

    Happysunshine, do you use mnemonics? I reckon you're one of those bright ppl who accidently stumbled on it as a kid. So its like second nature to you by now, you don't even know how you do it anymore, you just do! Is that right?

    Anyway, best be off now.

    Take Care

    John
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    "mnemonics"

    I agree, I had to learn 20-30 quotes the night before an exam, just putting them in a sequence that meant the first letter of each quote gave a legitimate word made me remember each quote instantly. Shame the quotes I learnt were of little use

    Much like placing specific objects in each room in your house in your mind, your brain forms an easy to remember link between the object and room, and because the rooms in your house are easy to remember the object will also pop into your head when required.

    How good would it be to have a photographic memory in that you can visit a specific "scene" in your mind, fast forward, rewind, change angles, zoom in and out. I am sure we have the capacity... Just only the select few that have the power.

    w.
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    I believe that I have an undeveloped Photographic memory. I can see images that I have seen but I don't remember texts and I am pretty good about discarding the stuff I don't need.
 
 
 
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