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    Honestly, choosing my A-levels has been an uphill struggle and just when I think I've figured it out I'm confused again!

    I applied to college recently with Psychology, Law, Gov & Pol and Sociology, after thinking for ages about it. I also already have a full A-level in history so I don't need to think of that. I want to get into Forensic Psychology (which is basically applying psychology to a court case if you're not sure what that is). I thought these were the perfect combo for that, applied and was accepted, but I still have time to change so I did some more research.

    Apparently both Law and Psychology aren't great for actually taking a degree in either of those subjects since uni lecturers don't want to have to reteach you. Plus neither psychology or sociology is very respected by universities. I assume Gov & Pol as a newer subject would also give a similar impression. I don't want my A-level choices to be 'soft' subjects. However these are still the subjects I'm actually interested in learning the most. I know what I'm like and if I'm bored I do not work well at all. There needs to be some kind of balance between practicality and interest that I just can't work out!

    So now I'm unsure on what to take and I want to make sure I take the best subjects for my career path. What will best display my skill set for universities? That sort of thing.

    Basically, has anyone else had this kind of experience with choosing A-levels? Any advice on what I should take? Anyone else going down this projected career path that have already decided their A-levels?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by PyjamaNerd)
    Honestly, choosing my A-levels has been an uphill struggle and just when I think I've figured it out I'm confused again!

    I applied to college recently with Psychology, Law, Gov & Pol and Sociology, after thinking for ages about it. I also already have a full A-level in history so I don't need to think of that. I want to get into Forensic Psychology (which is basically applying psychology to a court case if you're not sure what that is). I thought these were the perfect combo for that, applied and was accepted, but I still have time to change so I did some more research.

    Apparently both Law and Psychology aren't great for actually taking a degree in either of those subjects since uni lecturers don't want to have to reteach you. Plus neither psychology or sociology is very respected by universities. I assume Gov & Pol as a newer subject would also give a similar impression. I don't want my A-level choices to be 'soft' subjects. However these are still the subjects I'm actually interested in learning the most. I know what I'm like and if I'm bored I do not work well at all. There needs to be some kind of balance between practicality and interest that I just can't work out!

    So now I'm unsure on what to take and I want to make sure I take the best subjects for my career path. What will best display my skill set for universities? That sort of thing.

    Basically, has anyone else had this kind of experience with choosing A-levels? Any advice on what I should take? Anyone else going down this projected career path that have already decided their A-levels?

    Thanks
    OK lets tackle this one at a time:

    Apparently both Law and Psychology aren't great for actually taking a degree in either of those subjects since uni lecturers don't want to have to reteach you.
    NOPE - a decade ago then yes some universities were wary of Law A level for a law degree. Psychology A level has always been recognised as a good preparation for university study.
    See http://university.which.co.uk/advice...ut-a-level-law
    and
    http://university.which.co.uk/advice...udy-psychology

    Plus neither psychology or sociology is very respected by universities. I assume Gov & Pol as a newer subject would also give a similar impression.
    Universities with preferred subject lists:
    LSE: http://www.lse.ac.uk/study/undergrad...rallapplicants Ask for 2 subjects from the list (list includes History, Government and Politics, Psychology and Sociology)

    UCL: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-st...level-subjects Ask for 2 subjects from the list (list includes History, Government and Politics, Law, Psychology and Sociology)

    Sheffield: https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/undergra...olicies/alevel "Some of our courses will require A Level students to present one or two A levels from this list." (list includes History, Government and Politics, Law, Psychology and Sociology)

    Cambridge: http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a...ectmatters.pdf Make recommendations on subjects that keep options open. (for Arts and Social Sciences the list includes: History, Government and Politics, Law, Psychology and Sociology)

    Trinity College Cambridge: http://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/admissions...l-combinations Ask for 2 subjects from their "A" list and others from their "B" list. "C" list subjects are only accepted as a fourth A level
    History is A list suitable for arts courses, Government and Politics, Law, Psychology and Sociology are B list only for Arts courses.
    ("Each year Trinity admits approximately 200 undergraduates" - this isn't a deal breaker unless you're interested in applying for this one small college at Cambridge).

    Russell Group Informed Choices: http://russellgroup.ac.uk/media/5320...medchoices.pdf Identifies subjects suitable for keeping your options open (includes History). For Psychology " Essential advanced level qualifications - A few courses ask for one from Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics."
    "Useful advanced level qualifications - Biology, Mathematics, Psychology, Sociology, Computing/Computer Science."

    http://university.which.co.uk/advice...-level-choices is a useful read in differentiating between the "facilitating" subjects that give you more options if you're not sure and the "preferred" subjects for specific courses. If you know what you want to study there's no need to take subjects that aren't relevant or enjoyable to you.

    In other words - Your A level choices are absolutely fine - although you'll need to check with individual university course requirements to identify Psychology courses requiring science A levels (other than Psychology).

    It's also worth noting that Psychology even as a social science is quite quantitative - so making sure you're happy and comfortable with basic statistics is worthwhile preparation for most courses.
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    Thanks for that info, I overthink quite a bit and all those links really helped! I have decided to switch out Sociology for Biology so I can get some more practice in a hard science in preparation for what I'll be learning in Uni, also as the Uni's you mentioned seem to like applicants having it. But other than that I'm happy and confident in my choices!
 
 
 
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