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    Hi all,

    I was wondering if I could get some insight into the teaching profession at college level with a particular focus on geography/environmental science courses.

    I've had a look online and seen there are various routes into teaching in this area with actual teaching certificates not always required. What is seen as the ideal route into teaching in this area?

    Also, what is the typical day like of a teacher in this subject field? Looking back to my college days and the class contact time the teachers had, it only added to around 9 hours per week. Obviously there is a big gap here and I was wondering what else is involved beyond marking, lessons prep, personal tutor time.

    An issue I've seen floating around is also job security in this field, is it as bad as is made out or do teachers generally maintain steady contracts?

    Just a little background, I have a BSc in Environmental science with Hons. I currently work full time in a non teaching role within the construction sector.

    Many thanks for reading/providing feedback!
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    (Original post by Richytm)
    What is seen as the ideal route into teaching in this area?
    I'm new to the sector myself, so cannot answer all your questions confidently, but the ideal route would be a PGCE in FE.
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    (Original post by Richytm)
    Hi all,

    I was wondering if I could get some insight into the teaching profession at college level with a particular focus on geography/environmental science courses.

    I've had a look online and seen there are various routes into teaching in this area with actual teaching certificates not always required. What is seen as the ideal route into teaching in this area?

    Also, what is the typical day like of a teacher in this subject field? Looking back to my college days and the class contact time the teachers had, it only added to around 9 hours per week. Obviously there is a big gap here and I was wondering what else is involved beyond marking, lessons prep, personal tutor time.

    An issue I've seen floating around is also job security in this field, is it as bad as is made out or do teachers generally maintain steady contracts?

    Just a little background, I have a BSc in Environmental science with Hons. I currently work full time in a non teaching role within the construction sector.

    Many thanks for reading/providing feedback!
    Hi. As an A-Level teacher I hope I can provide some insight here, maybe not specific to Geography though.

    To answer your questions...ideal route. Hard to say. My route was a secondary PGCE in RE. I had no experience of A-Level. I now teach Politics. For people in my staffroom it is mixed between *people who did the post-16 PGCE or did a secondary PGCE. It should be noted that whilst teaching certificates are not necessarily required to get the job, you are required to get a PGCE within two years of starting the job, usually provided by the college you work at. There is a handful at my college who are doing that, including our Geography teacher.

    Typical day. It is 4.5 hours per class per week for me. A full time teacher at my college has 5 classes and a tutor group so that adds up to...about 23.5 hours of contact a week. You will EASILY fill the rest of time with prep, and then some. To be honest you will probably find that your subjects (like me with Politics) will rarely be full time. I don't know how much this bothers you. If it does bother you, consider teaching 11-18 Geography.

    Job security is an issue and a massive downside compared to secondary. There are a lot more one year/hourly paid roles around with colleges feeling they can use newly experienced teachers who are desperate to get a job. I've been a victim of this. It is hard. I won't lie.

    Feel free to ask any other questions. I've been teaching for a year now and I always wanted to teach A-Level but was never sure quite the best way. I remember posting threads on here about it too. I'll help any way I can *
 
 
 
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