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    As the title states , though the specifics I wanted to know where:

    Is there going to be a mix of going through books or would a course attempt to work with a single book ?


    As I have heard you can pretty much learn any course available, so how do examinations work in university?????Do you get a specification , and books that answer it at university ? Or is it actually random topics and you should know everything there is about this topic?Do lectures explain everything, how exactly would they differ from classes?

    Are you provided with places to learn?
    (for example a library with books that support your course)

    Lastly are you able to ask questions to the lecturer or would you have to research any questions?
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    (Original post by Aoba)
    As the title states , though the specifics I wanted to know where:

    Is there going to be a mix of going through books or would a course attempt to work with a single book ?

    As I have heard you can pretty much learn any course available, so how do examinations work in university?????Do you get a specification , and books that answer it at university ? Or is it actually random topics and you should know everything there is about this topic?Do lectures explain everything, how exactly would they differ from classes?

    Are you provided with places to learn?
    (for example a library with books that support your course)

    Lastly are you able to ask questions to the lecturer or would you have to research any questions?
    Each university usually sets out their own specification for what they will teach through the year, so you won't be able to find one book that completely summarised everything you need to know like there is for A Level/GCSE. For each module you will usually get a reading list where lecturers will often refer to certain chapters for you to read to make sure you understand the topic.

    Most universities have libraries in which students can read or use computers; there are usually quiet work spaces which you can use to study in peace, too.

    Many people stay behind after lectures to discuss which the lecturer if they can't ask them within the schedule. An email address and office times would be made available to students which can allow them to ask questions outside of the schedule.
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    Usually you'll get lecture notes which will cover what you need to know for that module, although for some subjects it may be less as you need to learn around and in others you'll get taught more than you need in order to give you context of why you're learning it.

    Lectures differ from classes as you are really just being read to and there's not nearly as much interaction, you will have seminars/tutorials/labs which are more interactive though.

    You'll have libraries and study spaces to go to, guest lectures or society lectures too if you want to learn above and beyond.

    You can ask the lecturer questions, most will accept them in a lecture if you don't understand something at the time it's being talked about (although don't do this too much as you could get a reputation), you can also ask them after the lecture is done, email them or go to their office hours. If you have a seminar or tutorial this would be this best time to ask however as these are the designated slots for you to ask questions, although they aren't necessarily lead by a lecturer hence why I'm mentioning them separately. Note that this doesn't apply to labs, you should be near fluent in the theory at least if you are going into a lab unless specifically told otherwise.
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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    Usually you'll get lecture notes which will cover what you need to know for that module, although for some subjects it may be less as you need to learn around and in others you'll get taught more than you need in order to give you context of why you're learning it.

    Lectures differ from classes as you are really just being read to and there's not nearly as much interaction, you will have seminars/tutorials/labs which are more interactive though.

    You'll have libraries and study spaces to go to, guest lectures or society lectures too if you want to learn above and beyond.

    You can ask the lecturer questions, most will accept them in a lecture if you don't understand something at the time it's being talked about (although don't do this too much as you could get a reputation), you can also ask them after the lecture is done, email them or go to their office hours. If you have a seminar or tutorial this would be this best time to ask however as these are the designated slots for you to ask questions, although they aren't necessarily lead by a lecturer hence why I'm mentioning them separately. Note that this doesn't apply to labs, you should be near fluent in the theory at least if you are going into a lab unless specifically told otherwise.
    In gcse and a levels students are taught to go over what we have learnt in class at home. Is it like this in uni? Do you have to revise regularly outside the lecture hall or is that only confined to exam period?

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    (Original post by Gladiatorsword)
    In gcse and a levels students are taught to go over what we have learnt in class at home. Is it like this in uni? Do you have to revise regularly outside the lecture hall or is that only confined to exam period?

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    You're definitely told to, whether you have to will depend on the subject.
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    (Original post by Aoba)
    As the title states , though the specifics I wanted to know where:

    Is there going to be a mix of going through books or would a course attempt to work with a single book ?


    As I have heard you can pretty much learn any course available, so how do examinations work in university?????Do you get a specification , and books that answer it at university ? Or is it actually random topics and you should know everything there is about this topic?Do lectures explain everything, how exactly would they differ from classes?

    Are you provided with places to learn?
    (for example a library with books that support your course)

    Lastly are you able to ask questions to the lecturer or would you have to research any questions?
    Usually, there is no 'specific' book that a module focuses on, let alone a course. The courses are broken down into modules and then into the three different years. Within those modules there are different topics and these are broken down into examinations and assignments and so on. There may be a book loosely covered that is the aim but there will be a mixture of books on a reading list that you do as 'wider reading' so you can reference them during an argument in a examination or to support a point in a assignment. However - universities do things differently to each other so it all depends.

    I only had one examination in university and that was in my first year - that was based upon work I'd done in December and reflection about that with links to texts to theoretical texts that supported my practical and then an unseen text with a question on that. Lectures usually go over everything that you will cover and there are usually specific sessions to discuss examinations and assignments but again, different for every university.

    Yes, it's highly unlikely a university won't have a library. You can borrow books from there and they usually have computer suits and quiet reading areas to do research and what not. Yes - your lecturers are there to support you and will do a great deal but at the same time, it's about individual learning at this stage of your educational career therefore they will encourage you to research the information for yourself.
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    (Original post by Aoba)
    As the title states , though the specifics I wanted to know where:

    Is there going to be a mix of going through books or would a course attempt to work with a single book ?


    As I have heard you can pretty much learn any course available, so how do examinations work in university?????Do you get a specification , and books that answer it at university ? Or is it actually random topics and you should know everything there is about this topic?Do lectures explain everything, how exactly would they differ from classes?

    Are you provided with places to learn?
    (for example a library with books that support your course)

    Lastly are you able to ask questions to the lecturer or would you have to research any questions?
    Are you going to uni or is this just random? Surely you've been to Open Days and Applicant Days if you're going to uni this year?
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    Are you going to uni or is this just random? Surely you've been to Open Days and Applicant Days if you're going to uni this year?
    Yes I am going to uni but not this year, I'm also not so sure on how trustworthy open days are..
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    Is there no standard exam for degrees? Would you not have an examination to determine a level for your degree?
    What I'm thinking is that degrees usually have ranking orders such as
    First-class honours (1st)If you were (2 people) at two different universities say Cambridge and one that is far less academically present with good reputation. and someone did not achieve a first class honours in Cambridge but did in the other would, the other be considered to have a better degree? In my opinion I thought this was only possible if they shared a common examination but hearing this it sounds as if they do not?
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    (Original post by Aoba)
    Is there no standard exam for degrees? Would you not have an examination to determine a level for your degree?
    What I'm thinking is that degrees usually have ranking orders such as
    First-class honours (1st)If you were (2 people) at two different universities say Cambridge and one that is far less academically present with good reputation. and someone did not achieve a first class honours in Cambridge but did in the other would, the other be considered to have a better degree? In my opinion I thought this was only possible if they shared a common examination but hearing this it sounds as if they do not?
    Exams are set by the lecturers for a module. These will be based on module and programme specifications which in turn refer to the national qaa subject benchmarks.

    Universities use a system of internal quality assessment, external examiners from other universities and national quality assessments to monitor standards.

    http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en Has more information.
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    (Original post by Aoba)
    Yes I am going to uni but not this year, I'm also not so sure on how trustworthy open days are..
    I know what you mean about Open Days. If it's on a weekday you'll get a better understanding of the "feel" for the university. Also, there is no harm is asking students you see around, rather than relying on the students showing you around as their job is to hype up the university.
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    I know what you mean about Open Days. If it's on a weekday you'll get a better understanding of the "feel" for the university. Also, there is no harm is asking students you see around, rather than relying on the students showing you around as their job is to hype up the university.
    Or just ask the students who are there to help what the worst thing is about each aspect of student life
 
 
 
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