Fox Corner
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Hello psychologists,

If you're doing/have done psychology at A-Level or above, me and The Learn Ranger want to know why you picked it, and what you love about it.

You don't have to write loads, but we thought up a few questions to get you going Image


What does psychology involve?

How does A-Level differ from GCSE? If you didn't do the GCSE, do you think this was a drawback?

How are you assessed?

What skills have you developed?

What does doing psychology lead to, either in careers or further education?

Do you have any advice for people thinking of picking psychology?

Feel free to answer as many or as little questions as you like. We're thinking about writing a little guide to particular subjects - if we use any of your answers you will be credited Image
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Findlay6
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I studied Psychology up to MA level and now teach the AQA spec. to A-Level students.

Psychology is the study of human behaviour via social research. It's interested in all aspects such as thinking, feelings, actions and perceptions.

Many schools don't offer it at GCSE so you don't need to have studied it prior to A-Level - there is quite a few references to Maths and Biology though, so an interest in these may be handy and Sociology will compliment it nicely as both subjects cover social elements and Research Methods.
The major difference is the content - less studies and less detail at GCSE. You will end up repeating Research Methods if you study at both GCSE/A-Level as it's an essential unit for any social researcher.

AQA is assessed via exams. At the end of Year 2, you will have 3 exams which will assess you on the whole 2 years worth of content. (11 topics). questions vary from multiple choice to labeling diagrams to mini-extended essays.

Skills: Problem solving, analysis, academic writing and reporting, reporting data and statistics, abstract reasoning, organisational skills, communication and interpersonal skills.

After A-Level you can apply for a Psychology degree (full or combined with something else) and MA/PhD after that.
Career-wise you can go into almost anything with it: Counselling/Mental Health, Social Work, Education (teaching or supporting), Law and Business, Psychiatry, Medical fields (Nurses/support workers/pharmacology), Neurology/Cognitive roles (brains), Criminology/Sociology related fields.

Psychology can be full-on if you've had no prior learning. You'd be expected to keep-up with the lessons and there's a lot to cover in 2 years (which means a lot to revise!) If you're interested in learning more about yourself in the process of gaining an A-Level this is a great subject to choose. There are very few careers nowadays that don't involve some level of human interaction, Psychology will help you understand why some people behave a bit different and human behaviour in general.
Why do we obey? Why do you forget things? Why do you struggle to keep a relationship? What is Depression? What was Freud going on about? - a few questions you can answer.
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