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    Hi all . I hope i'm posting in the right place and that someone may be able to help.
    I'm 31 and I've been wanting to teach early years for some time. I decided to take the plunge and resit my GCSEs this September so that I can do an access course next year, and then go on to uni to do a BA hons degree in early years teaching. I thought I'd take this route as I'm not planning on going back to work until my son is 5, he's now nearly 2 so timing is good in that sense.
    Since making that decision I briefly had a conversation with a TA that I got chatting to at the hair salon,she told me her training is funded through the school she works for, from her NVQ L2 to HTLA. She's now doing a foundation degree and that's also paid for. Do schools offer funding for career progression or is this lady one of the lucky few?
    Also, I've just read up on student loans. This has made me rethink the uni route as it's a 30 year loan and I'm guessing as you work your way up the pay scale (is the pay rise yearly?) more will be taken out of your wage each month. So over the 30 years I'm starting to wonder if I'l be any better off financially after all of the deductions. It's not all about the pay packet but its a big part.
    Sorry for the ramblings. I am just so torn as which route to take and I don't seem to be able to find much on line.
    Thanks so much in advance to anyone who can help.
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    It isn't very common for schools to pay for teacher training - some are struggling to pay for the teachers they already have! The people I have come across who have had their training paid for by a school are those who were long time TAs who were then encouraged to make the leap to qualified teacher by the school itself.

    As for student loans, yes, it is very likely that you would end up paying the full amount you have borrowed with interest over the course of your career. You repay 9% of your salary so, depending on your circumstances, repayments may not necessarily be unmanageable. Progression up the pay scale is linked to performance, so schools can withhold significant pay rises if performance objectives are not met but, nonetheless, everyone experiences increases of 1% annually at the moment. These increases are determined by the government each year and can change in both directions.

    You have other options for training for which you would actually receive a salary as you would be teaching from the outset: there is Teach First - you don't get a choice in regards to where you teach, though, and, for a parent, I imagine that would be an issue. There is also the salaried School Direct route - you need to have three years of work experience in any field to be eligible and competition can be fierce so school experience is likely to be advantageous. You have enough time to ensure that you are a good candidate for this route, though. Perhaps you could volunteer at a school that offers the salaried route and find out what they look for in successful candidates?
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    Pierson, thank you so much that has been really helpful!
    My main concern with the uni route is just that of the loan, as I'd be paying it off up until retirement more or less. So I worried that the more I earnt the more I would have to pay back each month, never feeling the benefit of a pay rise. If that makes sense.
    I think I have already looked at Teach first but I don't have a degree already to go down that route.
    I will also have a look at School direct,thankyou.
    I have a position volunteering in a school starting in September. Where would I find a school that offers the salaried route, wouldn't be just a case of calling each school and asking or is is there somewhere I can find out?
    Many thanks again.
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    I don't think you are going to find a way of offsetting the cost of your degree, I'm afraid. There is only money available via postgraduate routes like the PGCE, Teach First and the salaried School Direct route, which enable graduates to earn an income whilst training (Teach First and the salaried School Direct route) or offset the cost of their training (PGCE bursary). I've realised, however, that you said you intend to study Early Years and, if you ensure that your undergraduate course offers QTS, you will not need to follow any of these postgraduate routes as you will be a qualified teacher upon successful completion of your degree.

    If you fund your degree via a student loan, you will still benefit from pay rises. This is a projection of what an newly qualified teacher outside of London may earn over the next few years if they progress up the pay scale each year and salaries continue to increase by 1% annually:

    Salary Loan repayment Gross income (after pension deductions and tax)
    £22,467 £132 £16,983
    £24,482 £313 £18,052
    £26,451 £514 £19,235
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    Thanks so much , I appreciate the reply as you've put my mind at ease. Think I was panicking because of my age,size of the debt etc . I think I might do the CACHE level 2 for Teaching assistants,along side of my GCSEs this year. That way I might gain a bit more insight than volunteering alone,and if all goes well I will continue down the uni route and do tte BA Hons with QTS topup. Thank you again 😀
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    After the age of 45 your student loan is written off and you don't need to pay it anymore X so you shouldn't need to worry about having to continue paying it when you're retired
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    (Original post by Runescapian)
    After the age of 45 your student loan is written off and you don't need to pay it anymore X so you shouldn't need to worry about having to continue paying it when you're retired
    Oh right, I thought it was repayable for 30 years, given my age I thought I wohld be paying it off for the rest of my working life. 45, that's great news. Thanks!
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    (Original post by Runescapian)
    After the age of 45 your student loan is written off and you don't need to pay it anymore X so you shouldn't need to worry about having to continue paying it when you're retired
    As far as I am aware, this only applies to loans taken out by people under 40 between 1990-97. As of 2012, there is no age-related write off, they are only written off after 30 years.

    http://www.slc.co.uk/services/loan-r...cellation.aspx
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    For students taking out a loan now, it is written off after 30 years but you will stop paying if your income drops below £21000 a year so unless you have a substantial pension you don't need to worry about paying it once you're retired.
 
 
 
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