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    GOP candidate’s controversial comments sometimes make task of bringing their communities to his camp more difficult, though change in discourse now happening, say Eve Stieglitz, Sajid Tarar.

    NEW YORK – Over the course of his campaign, the discourse of presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has offended many groups in the United States: Hispanics, African-Americans, women, Jews and Muslims have all felt targeted at least once. Jewish groups came out against Donald Trump last week after he tweeted an image depicting Hillary Clinton against a backdrop of cash and a six-sided star, which he later said was meant to be a sheriff’s star. And, in the wake of the massacre at the Pulse gay nightclub in Orlando last month, the candidate also reiterated his conviction that a temporary ban on Muslims entering the United States should be put in place. Despite these controversies, however, some Jews and Muslims have decided not only to vote for Trump, but to campaign to convince others in their communities to do so, as well. Eve Stieglitz and Sajid Tarar are both members of the National Diversity Coalition for Trump, a group of more than 50 representatives from dozens of minority communities in the United States established in April by Michael Cohen, adviser and special counsel at the Trump organization, with the goal of “recruiting, mobilizing and educating voters to help elect Donald Trump in November 2016,” according to the coalition’s website. The group held its first meeting with the Republican National Convention team last week to discuss strategy for the general election in November. Both Stieglitz and Tarar attended. Stieglitz, who represents Jewish American women in the coalition, was contacted to volunteer to take part in the initiative after some media appearances in which she defended the Republican candidate on American and Israeli Television. *
    I started becoming interested in Donald Trump’s campaign ever since I attended his campaign announcement almost exactly a year ago,
    she told The Jerusalem Post.
    After I heard him speak live at AIPAC in Washington DC, I felt confident that he was going to win the nomination.
    Stieglitz explained that her biggest concerns are the economy, with stagnant salaries and rising cost of living, and foreign policy, specifically, the “damage” caused by the Iran deal.

    *
    It’s a huge threat to America, and obviously to Israel,
    she said.
    I don’t want a continuation of Obama’s foreign policy. That would be like shooting ourselves in the foot. Look at what’s happening in the Middle East.” “Countries respect strength, not appeasement,
    she added. But convincing the American Jewish community to vote for Trump may not be an easy task. American Jews historically tend to line up with the Democratic Party at some 70 percent. Stieglitz, however, believes a shift in Jewish voting patterns is under way, especially in the post-Iran deal era.
    The large majority of Zionist Jews, I hate to compartmentalize but really the patriotic Zionist Jews, especially those who are against the Iran deal, are 1,000% for Trump,
    she told the Post. *
    It is very clear that he is going to be absolutely the best for Israel.
    Many Jews, she said, simply do not want to admit they are voting for Trump. *
    I think some people are scared because of the mainstream media and how Hillary’s camp is trying to silence people by name calling ‘racist’ and all that,
    she said.

    Pakistan-born Muslim American Tarar also has decided to dedicate much of his time to campaigning for Trump. Tarar, who came to the United States in his twenties to study law and is the father of four American children, told the Post that when Trump announced for the presidency, the candidate’s message immediately resonated with him. *
    I was part of the angry Americans who saw that traditional politicians, career politicians, legacy politics have failed America,
    he said.
    He is an outsider, has never been in political office before, has a self-funded campaign and never had some ivy-league staffer writing his speeches
    When asked about Trump’s controversial comments regarding the ban on Muslim immigration to the United States, Tarar told the Post:
    I’m with him. Radical Islam is not only a threat to Western civilization, it is a threat to itself,
    he said.
    I, as a Muslim, I am a victim. ISIS, Taliban, al-Qaida, they have killed more Muslims than anybody else.”
    Tarar founded a small organization entitled “Muslims for Trump” about five months ago in his hometown of Baltimore and has several hundred followers. *
    The California shooting happened and our immigration system failed to see it, to predict it,
    he explained.
    This current administration and Hillary Clinton want to bring Syrian refugees here. Why? Why don’t they go to the Muslim countries? Why don’t they go to Jordan, Turkey, Saudi Arabia? Why do they want to cross the Atlantic and come all the way here? If somebody doesn’t agree with American values or doesn’t like the American lifestyle, they’ve got nothing to do here
    Tarar said. *
    The people who are escaping those terror-reign countries like Iraq and Syria, they’re being educated to hate the West, to hate Americans, kill Jews and hate Jews,
    Steiglitz added. *
    Before they come to our country, they need to be educated with American and Western values and I don’t think there’s anything wrong with saying that.
    Both Steiglitz and Tarar admit, however, that Trump’s impulsive and controversial comments sometimes make their task of bringing their communities to the Trump camp more difficult. *
    They were taking me as a traitor, as a non-Muslim. They even asked me if Donald Trump is paying me,
    Tarar, who has received death threats from people in Arab countries around the world, told the Post.
    But I tell them what radical Islam is and I tell them: ‘You are a victim yourself.’
    While they agree that the Republican candidate should moderate his tone when formulating his ideas, Stieglitz and Tarar think a change in discourse is already happening, especially since Trump fired campaign manager Corey Lewandowski. *
    I think the campaign, as a whole, admittedly wasn’t well organized,
    Stieglitz said.
    I agree that he needs to be more specific, but I think after the convention, we’ll see much more of that.
    According to Tarar, while Trump’s message is full of nuances, the liberal media is to blame for portraying his ideas in a very “black and white” manner. After the Republican convention next week, Tarar said he is planning on dedicating 50% of his time to supporting the campaign.
    http://m.jpost.com/US-Elections/Jews...QzQTg2MzI0OTQ=
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    http://m.jpost.com/US-Elections/Jews...QzQTg2MzI0OTQ=[/QUOTE]

    Trump panders towards emotional sentiment which hinders the rationality within the societal discourse. Unequivocally, therefore, people will be attracted to his campaign even from these communities- fear>identity.
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    Trump panders towards emotional sentiment which hinders the rationality within the societal discourse. Unequivocally, therefore, people will be attracted to his campaign even from these communities- fear>identity.[/QUOTE]

    Trump is great
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    (Original post by Magnus Taylor)
    http://m.jpost.com/US-Elections/Jews...QzQTg2MzI0OTQ=

    Trump panders towards emotional sentiment which hinders the rationality within the societal discourse. Unequivocally, therefore, people will be attracted to his campaign even from these communities- fear>identity.
    That's exactly the same line of reasoning that lead to Remain losing the Brexit referendum. The condescending view that anyone who votes for Trump is just doing so because they're afraid, or unintelligent, or just plain racist. And just like it cost Remain the referendum, it could very easily carry Trump into the White House.

    People have legitimate concerns about uncontrolled, illegal immigration from Mexico. They have legitimate concerns about trade deals which have lined the pockets of big business whilst simultaneously hemorrhaging low skilled jobs to countries in the Central Americas and Asia. They have legitimate concerns about radical Islam, and the spread of this poisonous ideology. And they have legitimate concerns about how US foreign policy has been largely flawed over the past couple decades. To write all of these off as just the irrational fears of a bunch of uneducated, racist, white men is simply adding fuel to the fire. To ignore these concerns, rather than confront them and put forwards an alternative, is only going to increase the likelihood that Trump finds himself in the Oval Office in a few months.

    And labelling all these concerns as the concerns of the inwards-looking and the xenophobic is perhaps the biggest danger of all. It has become pervasive amongst the Left to do so these days, and all it serves to do is alienate the increasingly large faction of society who do not view uncontrolled immigration as a good thing. Brexit was the first warning of this, and if it isn't heeded, then Donald Trump will be the second, far louder alarm.
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    (Original post by Luke Kostanjsek)
    That's exactly the same line of reasoning that lead to Remain losing the Brexit referendum. The condescending view that anyone who votes for Trump is just doing so because they're afraid, or unintelligent, or just plain racist. And just like it cost Remain the referendum, it could very easily carry Trump into the White House.

    People have legitimate concerns about uncontrolled, illegal immigration from Mexico. They have legitimate concerns about trade deals which have lined the pockets of big business whilst simultaneously hemorrhaging low skilled jobs to countries in the Central Americas and Asia. They have legitimate concerns about radical Islam, and the spread of this poisonous ideology. And they have legitimate concerns about how US foreign policy has been largely flawed over the past couple decades. To write all of these off as just the irrational fears of a bunch of uneducated, racist, white men is simply adding fuel to the fire. To ignore these concerns, rather than confront them and put forwards an alternative, is only going to increase the likelihood that Trump finds himself in the Oval Office in a few months.

    And labelling all these concerns as the concerns of the inwards-looking and the xenophobic is perhaps the biggest danger of all. It has become pervasive amongst the Left to do so these days, and all it serves to do is alienate the increasingly large faction of society who do not view uncontrolled immigration as a good thing. Brexit was the first warning of this, and if it isn't heeded, then Donald Trump will be the second, far louder alarm.
    Ok, so answer this buddy, if a doctor misdiagnoses a patient is that harmful?
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    (Original post by Magnus Taylor)
    Ok, so answer this buddy, if a doctor misdiagnoses a patient is that harmful?
    I'll be interested to hear how this analogy links back to the subject of Trump's popularity, and the wider anti-globalisation agenda.
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    (Original post by Luke Kostanjsek)
    I'll be interested to hear how this analogy links back to the subject of Trump's popularity, and the wider anti-globalisation agenda.
    Thats essentially how Trump is operating within the political sphere, he's lumping different problems into one homogenous entity. He's not proposing realistic solutions, you appear to think of yourself so highly, how on earth can you justify a man who proposes to 'build a wall between Mexico and the United States' as well as other racist strategies such as deportation of Muslims. I'm not in anyway a 'leftie' but rather a conservative follower so please don't try and portray me as such. Moreover, espousing a discourse that perpetuates racial and cultural polarisation is not what we need right now in the United States, it is therefore necessary to educate people that may have the opportunity to influence the vote who use this site in the US.
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    (Original post by Magnus Taylor)
    Thats essentially how Trump is operating within the political sphere, he's lumping different problems into one homogenous entity. He's not proposing realistic solutions, you appear to think of yourself so highly, how on earth can you justify a man who proposes to 'build a wall between Mexico and the United States' as well as other racist strategies such as deportation of Muslims. I'm not in anyway a 'leftie' but rather a conservative follower so please don't try and portray me as such. Moreover, espousing a discourse that perpetuates racial and cultural polarisation is not what we need right now in the United States, it is therefore necessary to educate people that may have the opportunity to influence the vote who use this site in the US.
    Building a wall between the USA and Mexico is racist how exactly? Trying to stop people illegally entering the USA from another country is not racist. He's not saying 'close the border with Mexico, no more Mexicans in the USA', he's saying 'hang on a second, why is it so easy for people to cross the border illegally?'. That's essentially saying that any country which has a border with any other country, and enforces it, is racist. Explain to me how stemming the flow of illegal immigrants suggests that Hispanics are fundamentally inferior to white people?

    You can't be racist towards Muslims, Islam is not a race. You may as well say he's being sexist towards Islam for all the sense that makes. I actually agree with you, in that what he said about stopping Muslims getting into the country is pretty despicable. But conflating that with the subtler point, which is that Islam is a backwards, intolerant ideology whose influence is only growing, is naive. Trump is overplaying it because it washes with a lot of people in swing states. That doesn't mean that Islam isn't a very real problem in the 21st century, and that sweeping it under the rug is not helping.
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    (Original post by Luke Kostanjsek)
    That's exactly the same line of reasoning that lead to Remain losing the Brexit referendum. The condescending view that anyone who votes for Trump is just doing so because they're afraid, or unintelligent, or just plain racist. And just like it cost Remain the referendum, it could very easily carry Trump into the White House.

    People have legitimate concerns about uncontrolled, illegal immigration from Mexico. They have legitimate concerns about trade deals which have lined the pockets of big business whilst simultaneously hemorrhaging low skilled jobs to countries in the Central Americas and Asia. They have legitimate concerns about radical Islam, and the spread of this poisonous ideology. And they have legitimate concerns about how US foreign policy has been largely flawed over the past couple decades. To write all of these off as just the irrational fears of a bunch of uneducated, racist, white men is simply adding fuel to the fire. To ignore these concerns, rather than confront them and put forwards an alternative, is only going to increase the likelihood that Trump finds himself in the Oval Office in a few months.

    And labelling all these concerns as the concerns of the inwards-looking and the xenophobic is perhaps the biggest danger of all. It has become pervasive amongst the Left to do so these days, and all it serves to do is alienate the increasingly large faction of society who do not view uncontrolled immigration as a good thing. Brexit was the first warning of this, and if it isn't heeded, then Donald Trump will be the second, far louder alarm.
    Since when did the US have issues with "uncontrolled immigration"? How many issues do the Muslim community in the US (who are generally educated, working and commit less crime) cause, as opposed to most of the other communities? A spade is a spade; if Trump makes xenophobic and bigoted comments which alienate entire communities then he is an xenophobe and a bigot, simple as. Considering the sheer amount of hatred I have seen radiating from his supporters on the Internet at all, I'm not about to try and "understand" such people.

    I understood from the start of the referendum that people had different reasons for voting for Brexit; even though I voted Remain, the EU is far from perfect. That does not compare to voting for a blatantly hateful and divisive man.
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    (Original post by Luke Kostanjsek)
    That's exactly the same line of reasoning that lead to Remain losing the Brexit referendum. The condescending view that anyone who votes for Trump is just doing so because they're afraid, or unintelligent, or just plain racist. And just like it cost Remain the referendum, it could very easily carry Trump into the White House.

    People have legitimate concerns about uncontrolled, illegal immigration from Mexico. They have legitimate concerns about trade deals which have lined the pockets of big business whilst simultaneously hemorrhaging low skilled jobs to countries in the Central Americas and Asia. They have legitimate concerns about radical Islam, and the spread of this poisonous ideology. And they have legitimate concerns about how US foreign policy has been largely flawed over the past couple decades. To write all of these off as just the irrational fears of a bunch of uneducated, racist, white men is simply adding fuel to the fire. To ignore these concerns, rather than confront them and put forwards an alternative, is only going to increase the likelihood that Trump finds himself in the Oval Office in a few months.

    And labelling all these concerns as the concerns of the inwards-looking and the xenophobic is perhaps the biggest danger of all. It has become pervasive amongst the Left to do so these days, and all it serves to do is alienate the increasingly large faction of society who do not view uncontrolled immigration as a good thing. Brexit was the first warning of this, and if it isn't heeded, then Donald Trump will be the second, far louder alarm.
    Agreed - good post!
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    (Original post by Magnus Taylor)
    Thats essentially how Trump is operating within the political sphere, he's lumping different problems into one homogenous entity. He's not proposing realistic solutions, you appear to think of yourself so highly, how on earth can you justify a man who proposes to 'build a wall between Mexico and the United States' as well as other racist strategies such as deportation of Muslims. I'm not in anyway a 'leftie' but rather a conservative follower so please don't try and portray me as such. Moreover, espousing a discourse that perpetuates racial and cultural polarisation is not what we need right now in the United States, it is therefore necessary to educate people that may have the opportunity to influence the vote who use this site in the US.
    Luke wasn't defending Trump in his post. What he was doing was acknowledging that there are issues in American society (like in the UK) that the establishment is not talking about or addressing. But Trump is. He is talking directly to those disenfranchised folks who feel mainstream politics has abandoned them and he is talking in a way that is easy to understand and easy to agree with on an emotional level.

    That said, I fully agree with you that most of what he talks is difficult if not impossible to actually implement. But to become President, you don't have to prove you can do the job, just convince people you can.
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    (Original post by Luke Kostanjsek)
    Building a wall between the USA and Mexico is racist how exactly? Trying to stop people illegally entering the USA from another country is not racist. He's not saying 'close the border with Mexico, no more Mexicans in the USA', he's saying 'hang on a second, why is it so easy for people to cross the border illegally?'. That's essentially saying that any country which has a border with any other country, and enforces it, is racist. Explain to me how stemming the flow of illegal immigrants suggests that Hispanics are fundamentally inferior to white people?

    You can't be racist towards Muslims, Islam is not a race. You may as well say he's being sexist towards Islam for all the sense that makes. I actually agree with you, in that what he said about stopping Muslims getting into the country is pretty despicable. But conflating that with the subtler point, which is that Islam is a backwards, intolerant ideology whose influence is only growing, is naive. Trump is overplaying it because it washes with a lot of people in swing states. That doesn't mean that Islam isn't a very real problem in the 21st century, and that sweeping it under the rug is not helping.
    I don't think you understand the principle case in this debate, allow me to enlighten you. When you have a potential president of the US proclaiming his open disapproval of the border with Mexicans, that exacerbates the lack of social cohesion in society. There is already very tight immigration controls, in practice he is legitimising people's racist sentiment on a macro scale. This then results in micro-level hate crimes ACROSS the United States, within such offences- you get racist language thrown at Mexicans, racist attacks, trickling down into the education system where it happens with school children. This is a serious harm.
    Regarding the second point, I know Islam is not a race but a religion. Yet in a world of postcolonialism where the discourse of Orientalism is becoming far more prevalent, most people unfortunately fall under the media stereotyping of them as such. Islam is not a problem in the 21st century, it is radical extremists which are a different issue. It is the same with Christianity, and how you can get christian fundamentalists etc. Trump's ideology is to promote the clash of civilisations between the West and the East, which in turn facilitates an increased volume of Occidentalism. The way to defeat extremism is through education, not through Trump's solutions which are not rational.
    Furthermore, regarding a previous point, these concerns you highlight such as fears over immigration are ALSO felt by intellectual individuals in society, we don't disagree with the problems that exist in society. The arguments differ in emphasis however when it comes to how to solve them, my point on he panders towards emotional sentiment means that it results in absurd propositions being put forward. This prevents more rational strategies being adopted, I.E. if the public choose only to listen to Trump then other measures cannot be implemented.
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    MAGA Trump/Wall 2016!
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    (Original post by WBZ144)
    Since when did the US have issues with "uncontrolled immigration"? How many issues do the Muslim community in the US (who are generally educated, working and commit less crime) cause, as opposed to most of the other communities? A spade is a spade; if Trump makes xenophobic and bigoted comments which alienate entire communities then he is an xenophobe and a bigot, simple as. Considering the sheer amount of hatred I have seen radiating from his supporters on the Internet at all, I'm not about to try and "understand" such people.

    I understood from the start of the referendum that people had different reasons for voting for Brexit; even though I voted Remain, the EU is far from perfect. That does not compare to voting for a blatantly hateful and divisive man.
    I completely agree, it would be dangerous if he was elected.
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    (Original post by Luke Kostanjsek)
    Building a wall between the USA and Mexico is racist how exactly? Trying to stop people illegally entering the USA from another country is not racist. He's not saying 'close the border with Mexico, no more Mexicans in the USA', he's saying 'hang on a second, why is it so easy for people to cross the border illegally?'. That's essentially saying that any country which has a border with any other country, and enforces it, is racist. Explain to me how stemming the flow of illegal immigrants suggests that Hispanics are fundamentally inferior to white people?

    You can't be racist towards Muslims, Islam is not a race. You may as well say he's being sexist towards Islam for all the sense that makes. I actually agree with you, in that what he said about stopping Muslims getting into the country is pretty despicable. But conflating that with the subtler point, which is that Islam is a backwards, intolerant ideology whose influence is only growing, is naive. Trump is overplaying it because it washes with a lot of people in swing states. That doesn't mean that Islam isn't a very real problem in the 21st century, and that sweeping it under the rug is not helping.
    There is more of a risk of backwards Christian ideology being pushed onto entire populations in America at this point; all one needs to do is take a look at the Christian nutcases of the Republican Party. Exactly how many Muslims are in Congress? And how many are nut jobs who want to make America more "Islamic"?

    You are right does not prove he is racist, but it does prove that he is a bigot. Fixed.

    Also, the wall that he proposes to build is an unrealistic proposal, not to mention that the way he talks about Mexicans is borderline dehumanising. Xenophobia does not have to be outright and blatant.
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    (Original post by WBZ144)
    Since when did the US have issues with "uncontrolled immigration"? How many issues do the Muslim community in the US (who are generally educated, working and commit less crime) cause, as opposed to most of the other communities? A spade is a spade; if Trump makes xenophobic and bigoted comments which alienate entire communities then he is an xenophobe and a bigot, simple as. Considering the sheer amount of hatred I have seen radiating from his supporters on the Internet at all, I'm not about to try and "understand" such people.

    I understood from the start of the referendum that people had different reasons for voting for Brexit; even though I voted Remain, the EU is far from perfect. That does not compare to voting for a blatantly hateful and divisive man.
    What do you think he wants to build a wall along the Mexican border for? It's precisely because of uncontrolled immigration from Mexico. Specifically, it's because of illegal immigration. It is not racist, nor is it xenophobic, to be opposed to illegal immigration. Again, by that line of reasoning, any country which enforces a border with any other country, is racist or xenophobic.

    I disagree with a lot of what Trump has said about Muslims, but I also don't think Trump actually agrees with a lot of what he says about Muslims. He's pandering to an audience. The subtler message is that Islam is a backwards, toxic ideology which condones some truly vile stuff, and needs to be challenged. Whilst it may be true that Muslims in the West are more educated and more likely to be in work than the average (I honestly don't know how true that is), it is also true that 40% or so of them would support the imposition of Sharia Law and 20% or so of them sympathised with the cause of the 7/7 bombings. Islam should be challenged. That being said, I dislike pretty much everything that Trump has said about Muslims.

    Have you seen any footage of Trump rallies? The violence and hatred is overwhelmingly coming from those protesting against the Trump rallies, not the actual Trump supporters themselves. Trump has actually been forced to cancel rallies as a result of violence from those who are protesting against him.

    I don't even like Trump to be honest. I guess I might vote for him were I an American, but that's only because Hillary Clinton is just as awful a choice. My point was simply that the rhetoric coming from those who oppose Trump is nigh on identical to that coming from those who opposed Brexit, and that it will not do the Democrats any favours on election day.
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    (Original post by Luke Kostanjsek)
    That's exactly the same line of reasoning that lead to Remain losing the Brexit referendum. The condescending view that anyone who votes for Trump is just doing so because they're afraid, or unintelligent, or just plain racist. And just like it cost Remain the referendum, it could very easily carry Trump into the White House.

    People have legitimate concerns about uncontrolled, illegal immigration from Mexico. They have legitimate concerns about trade deals which have lined the pockets of big business whilst simultaneously hemorrhaging low skilled jobs to countries in the Central Americas and Asia. They have legitimate concerns about radical Islam, and the spread of this poisonous ideology. And they have legitimate concerns about how US foreign policy has been largely flawed over the past couple decades. To write all of these off as just the irrational fears of a bunch of uneducated, racist, white men is simply adding fuel to the fire. To ignore these concerns, rather than confront them and put forwards an alternative, is only going to increase the likelihood that Trump finds himself in the Oval Office in a few months.

    And labelling all these concerns as the concerns of the inwards-looking and the xenophobic is perhaps the biggest danger of all. It has become pervasive amongst the Left to do so these days, and all it serves to do is alienate the increasingly large faction of society who do not view uncontrolled immigration as a good thing. Brexit was the first warning of this, and if it isn't heeded, then Donald Trump will be the second, far louder alarm.
    Well put.

    I'd also like to add that people are increasingly frustrated that politics just doesn't work... people have been voting for change only to get screwed over by politicians who change their manifesto when they get into power, not their policies. Issues such as these lead people to vote for radical change. Immigration has been a huge issue for a long time and it's largely shied away from, ignored, misinterpreted.
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    (Original post by Luke Kostanjsek)
    What do you think he wants to build a wall along the Mexican border for? It's precisely because of uncontrolled immigration from Mexico. Specifically, it's because of illegal immigration. It is not racist, nor is it xenophobic, to be opposed to illegal immigration. Again, by that line of reasoning, any country which enforces a border with any other country, is racist or xenophobic.

    I disagree with a lot of what Trump has said about Muslims, but I also don't think Trump actually agrees with a lot of what he says about Muslims. He's pandering to an audience. The subtler message is that Islam is a backwards, toxic ideology which condones some truly vile stuff, and needs to be challenged. Whilst it may be true that Muslims in the West are more educated and more likely to be in work than the average (I honestly don't know how true that is), it is also true that 40% or so of them would support the imposition of Sharia Law and 20% or so of them sympathised with the cause of the 7/7 bombings. Islam should be challenged. That being said, I dislike pretty much everything that Trump has said about Muslims.

    Have you seen any footage of Trump rallies? The violence and hatred is overwhelmingly coming from those protesting against the Trump rallies, not the actual Trump supporters themselves. Trump has actually been forced to cancel rallies as a result of violence from those who are protesting against him.

    I don't even like Trump to be honest. I guess I might vote for him were I an American, but that's only because Hillary Clinton is just as awful a choice. My point was simply that the rhetoric coming from those who oppose Trump is nigh on identical to that coming from those who opposed Brexit, and that it will not do the Democrats any favours on election day.
    98% of statistics are made up
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    (Original post by IYGB)
    Trump panders towards emotional sentiment which hinders the rationality within the societal discourse. Unequivocally, therefore, people will be attracted to his campaign even from these communities- fear>identity.

    Trump is great
    (Original post by Magnus Taylor)

    Trump panders towards emotional sentiment which hinders the rationality within the societal discourse. Unequivocally, therefore, people will be attracted to his campaign even from these communities- fear>identity.
    **** the way IYGB quoted made me think he said this

    I agree Magnus. I think it's clever indeed but low as scum.
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    Anyway of COURSE jews and muslims agree!
    Many are Republican in US chasing the "American Dream. " So they embarrass themselves by voting super conservative to impress their non semitic neighbours and colleagues.
 
 
 
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