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    I will be applying to Uni this October (I'm in Year 12, moving up to Year 13 after this summer holidays), and am finding it difficult to choose between a BSc and a BA in economics!

    Some Universities that I want to go to offer only a BA in economics, and others only offer a BSc.... Can I apply for a BA from some uni's and a BSc from others (in my 5 choices), or will I have to tailor my personal statement to one specific type of course?
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    (Original post by danaustin6)
    I will be applying to Uni this October (I'm in Year 12, moving up to Year 13 after this summer holidays), and am finding it difficult to choose between a BSc and a BA in economics!

    Some Universities that I want to go to offer only a BA in economics, and others only offer a BSc.... Can I apply for a BA from some uni's and a BSc from others (in my 5 choices), or will I have to tailor my personal statement to one specific type of course?
    You certainly can apply to a mixture of BA and BSc degrees. A BSc in Economics usually means the degree has more quantitative-based modules, statistics and the like. Here is a quote from the TSR wiki:

    BSc Economics vs. BA Economics

    Important point - not all Economics courses are the same. They may have the same UCAS code but that doesn't mean there is some universal syllabus like at A level. Read the course descriptions carefully as each course will be very different, with a different focus and with different optional units. Do not get carried away with the idea of a particular University - make sure it is the course you actually want to do.

    There is fundemental difference between BSc and BA courses - read on ...

    BSc Economics

    Students studying on a BSc Economics degree course will learn pure mathematics and statistical theory and techniques for application in economic theory. Consequently, universities offering BSc Economics programmes expect candidates to offer Mathematics to A2 level (or equivalent). An example of a degree with heavy maths content is BSc Economics at Bristol.

    Most leading redbrick universities now offer BSc Economics programmes. Generally speaking these are considered to be of more career worth and academic satisfaction than the BA. However bear in mind it will not make much difference to employers in the UK if you have a BA rather than a BSc, but can give you slight edge internationally.

    BA Economics

    Students studying on a BA Economics degree course may use some mathematics, but to a much lesser extent than those on a BSc Economics programme. Often universities will only demand GCSE Mathematics (a B or above) for this programme. BA Economics involves a lot more discursive arguments and essays, and involves greater amounts of qualitative study, sometimes possibly in related social science fields. There is less competition for entry onto this course than on BSc Economics. An example of a less maths-focussed BA degree is BA Business Economics at Liverpool.

    Many Universities offer both a BA and BSc program, plus other interesting Economics degree with a particular focus such as 'with Finance', 'with International Relations' etc. The wide Economics program at the University of Sussex is a good example of this.

    Special Cases

    Some universities, such as Nottingham and Sheffield allow students without A-Level Maths to 'catch up' by means of specially designed modules incorporating refresher mathematics. Students will apply and enrol on the BA degree. However, subject to adequate performance, these students can take advanced mathematical modules and either transfer to the BSc or obtain an equally numerate BA.

    Cambridge BA Economics, Exeter BA Economics, Durham BA Economics and any Oxford Economics-related BAs are still very quantitative - it is the tradition of these universities that all Oxford, Cambridge and Durham degrees are BAs (even Mathematics and science), whilst it is only tradition for all Exeter undergraduates course in economics to be named a BA.
 
 
 
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