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    I have what's called a panic disorder and get panic attacks every time I'm in a situation where I'm put on the spot. Like speaking in front of others, picking up the phone and going to a job interview.
    This has been happening for years now, and I did go to my GP only once about this 5 years ago and they've given me beta blockers and they did work. However, I can't continue to take beta blockers forever as I need to really get over my panic attacks.

    Is there a cure and what do the NHS do to cure this? I really need to get over this because it's stopping me from progressing in life every time I'm in a situation that panics me my heart pumps so hard and I feel like I'm passing out
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    I think, but I'm not 100% sure, and it depends on you and the gp, but they can offer talking therapy, and give you ways to cope with your panic and help you Calm yourself down. I think they may also be able to offer cbt, which I think exposes you to things that make you panic (really really gradually) and teaches you ways to deal with it. But this may all be wrong! There is an nhs website page about it

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    no cure, you'll just be drugged, which can be a good and bad thing, i mean having it isnt great and some peopel would rather be drugged than face it. and welcome to real life, not everyone is confident and feels great al the time, youll have to overcome it, which isnt easy, or be drugged, there is not middle ground really.

    the option you have with dealing with it are to white knuckle it, which can work for some people.
    If your drugged you have the option of legal MDMA, pregrab. Bnezos, which doctors do not like to give out, look at america for a reason why. And SSRI's which are paracetamol really, they dont do much, i mean they do something but nothing youll really notice, OTC and do nothing much. All the option arent great apart from SSRI, since they addictive and you cant just be drugged to deal with it and life. Its sad but thats the option,

    Firstly theyll try to deal with it, without drugs and theyll try to help you. But for many this doesnt work, also GPs dont like to give the harder drugs like pregrab and benzos to young people, theyre really trying to get rid of their use in the UK,since they are addictive and open to abuse ( also people lie to get the drugs for free, when they dont need it, since it hard to prove these mental health problems ).If you really cant handle it and its lowering your QOL a great deal, or if nothing else work, drugs will be the only option, they might make it short-term, but if its bad, they might make it long-term, which they really do not like to do. They would just prefer you handle it yourself or get other forms of help. Either way, not to get you down in anyway, there is no cure teh NHS can offer, they can only help, but at the end of the day, its up to you to fix it, with their help.
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    SSRIs are not just like paracetamol at all. People respond differently to different antidepressants and different brands within those types. There are 3 types of anti depressants (ssri, beta blocker and SNRI) - obviously there are then different families of drugs within those umbrellas and different brands.

    There is no "cure" with medication, yet. But they improve quality of life and if you don't have a disorder but more a short term blip..meds can be as good as a cure by giving the mind respite to recover.

    I would certainly push for therapeutic intervention but this is no quick fix either. It can take many months to start to show any improvement

    Also worth bearing in mind that for some people, even with therapy, they will stay on medication forever. Therapy and meds are not mutually exclusive
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    I have a few MH conditions and panic disorder and agoraphobia are 2 of them. I went to my GP and all they did was offer me antidepressants and beta blockers. I cannot take meds due to OCD contamination fears so they referred me to a sort of self help worker for 3 sessions and a few sessions of CBT. To be honest though, everything they teach you at those sessions, you could easily teach yourself after reading some books on the subject.

    What helped me and got me out of being housebound wasn't meds or my GP. It was books and audio tapes by Dr Claire Weekes. Within a fortnight of listening/reading her work, I went from being totally housebound to being able to go into town for half an hour which was a huge improvement in such a short time and 3 years on, I've never fallen back to being housebound thanks to her teachings. She puts panic and anxiety in a way that is easy to understand and she shows its nothing to fear and that you shouldn't ever be bluffed by a feeling.

    I also made a challenge chart. I made a chart of all the things I was scared of which ranged from minor things like going out to the bins to major things like town and I had to do each thing 5 times and score it and each time I did it, the score would be high as I was really anxious or took a panic buy eventually it went down and down each time. I still do this if I am ever going through a panic setback and within a couple of days, I have sprung back.

    Its worth going to the GP definitely but there's also some work you have to put into it as well. Good luck
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    Some GPs have an excellent understanding of mental health whilst many leave a fair bit to be desired.

    I would recommend that you ask your GP for a referral to a counsellor. If for any reason, your GP/local NHS is a bit crap with that (some can be), I would urge you to source counselling from college/uni/a charity.

    I speak from experience.
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    (Original post by beautifulbigmacs)
    Some GPs have an excellent understanding of mental health whilst many leave a fair bit to be desired.

    I would recommend that you ask your GP for a referral to a counsellor. If for any reason, your GP/local NHS is a bit crap with that (some can be), I would urge you to source counselling from college/uni/a charity.

    I speak from experience.
    You are absolutely right. I was offered over the phone counselling and I gave it a go and it did t work for me. Told the GP and her response was that that was all that was on offer.
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    Hi i experience panic attacks a lot and the triggers are similar to what you described. I havent ever spoken to my gp about it but i have found some ways of calming down and preventing them. If you wanted any advice on that i would be happy to give you some 😊
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    I have to sit at the end of the row in lectures/seminars in case I have a panic attack. I also have atrial fibrillation where my heart beats too fast and the panic attacks make it worse.
 
 
 
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