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Free Taxi travel for epileptics watch

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    All in the title... Should epileptics/ individuals suffering from seizures be given a benefit in free Taxi travel, to help with general access to work/ social occasions? (Obviously from Government benefit funds).

    Let's face it- as someone who suffers with such seizures, it would help so many people to find work and perhaps even reduce suicide rates amongst epileptics.

    Seriously thinking of starting a petition lol
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    I think that is a good idea, because the majority of people with it cannot drive. It would help because if someone were to have a seisure in the taxi the driver can find help quickly, whereas on public transport if you have a seisure people won't necessarily know what to do and because the driver can't just stop the person could be hurt even more.
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    Surely, it shouldn't be just for people with epilepsy? It should be for those of us who have disabilities which do prevent them from driving too?
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    It already exists, bus/tube concessions and London Taxicard and other schemes exist. It just needs to be rolled out nationwide, and better tailored to mental and neurological health conditions (not just physical health conditions).
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    Free? No. Everybody has to spend money on transport for commuting etc. so the notion that being epileptic should give you free transport is unfair, however I would agree with some system that subsidises transport such that they'd be paying what somebody who can driver would be for their transport (whilst compensating for the benefit that drivers have of having capital locked up in a car).
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    It certainly shouldn't be given to epileptics, my sister and grandad have epilepsy and they're perfectly able to use public transport


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    You could make the same case for diabetics on the (flawed) basis that the drivers would know how to treat someone who starts going off on one (I can't remember what it's called, but you gotta do the injection thing to stop them from going into a coma).

    You could also make the same case for anyone who suffers from a condition that could cause them involuntary health problems at any given time, at which point you're basically spending vast amounts of money on training people to be the drivers of your own personal ambulance.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Surely, it shouldn't be just for people with epilepsy? It should be for those of us who have disabilities which do prevent them from driving too?
    I was thinking the same... if it's just gonna be for epileptics, then no thanks.
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    (Original post by Drunk Punx)
    You could make the same case for diabetics on the (flawed) basis that the drivers would know how to treat someone who starts going off on one (I can't remember what it's called, but you gotta do the injection thing to stop them from going into a coma).
    Not all diabetics need injections though. One of my friends is a diabetic. He's never collapsed and doesn't use injections.

    Free? No. Everybody has to spend money on transport for commuting etc.
    But if you need a taxi, it's more expensive. Plus, non-disabled people have the option of walking.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Not all diabetics need injections though. One of my friends is a diabetic. He's never collapsed and doesn't use injections.
    Not the kind of injections that Type 1s have to do, the kind of injection that stops you from going comatose if your blood sugar levels go tits up (my brother's diabetic and I should really be more knowledgeable on this than I actually am).


    But if you need a taxi, it's more expensive. Plus, non-disabled people have the option of walking.
    Unless you have no legs, are wheelchair bound, or have a condition that makes it literally impossible for you to walk anywhere, you have the option of walking.

    I don't see why the taxpayer should subsidise travel for people who are more than capable of travelling somewhere by themselves if they manage their condition properly (though I'll admit that there will always be the wildcard conditions that have problems that can strike at any given time).
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    absolutely not
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    my sister is epileptic and has a rare brain disorder called sturgeweber syndrome, and she nor i think she should get 'free taxi' she can use a bus with her free disabled bus pass
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    (Original post by Goaded)
    absolutely not
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    my sister is diabetic and has a rare brain disorder called sturgeweber syndrome, and she nor i think she should get 'free taxi' she can use a bus with her free disabled bus pass
    But what about people who live in very rural areas, without regular bus services?
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    (Original post by Phipp91)
    But what about people who live in very rural areas, without regular bus services?
    Well I DO live in a very rural area with awful bus service, she still gets out.
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    (Original post by Drunk Punx)
    Unless you have no legs, are wheelchair bound, or have a condition that makes it literally impossible for you to walk anywhere, you have the option of walking.

    I don't see why the taxpayer should subsidise travel for people who are more than capable of travelling somewhere by themselves if they manage their condition properly (though I'll admit that there will always be the wildcard conditions that have problems that can strike at any given time).
    If only it was that simple. I'm partially sighted, I'm going deaf and I've got a learning disability. Walking is far more than just being able to put one foot in front of the other. Yes, I can do that. But I can't do it safely. You also can't give me a map, tell me we're here and expect me to get there (unless it's 5 minutes up the road) without getting lost.
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    I'm pretty sure people with disabilities can get money to help them get around if mobility is a serious issue. And epilepsy can either be or not be a disability depending on how it affects the individual and whether they find a way to manage it. I know multiple people with epilepsy who (while not able to drive) are perfectly able to use public transport and to be honest there are plenty of non drivers (myself included) who make do with public transport.
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    (Original post by doodle_333)
    I'm pretty sure people with disabilities can get money to help them get around if mobility is a serious issue. And epilepsy can either be or not be a disability depending on how it affects the individual and whether they find a way to manage it. I know multiple people with epilepsy who (while not able to drive) are perfectly able to use public transport and to be honest there are plenty of non drivers (myself included) who make do with public transport.
    But there's a difference between not being to drive for medical reasons and not being to drive through choice.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    But there's a difference between not being to drive for medical reasons and not being to drive through choice.
    some difference yes, although I'd love to be able to drive, financially it's just not viable (and trust me it's not my choice to be poor)... I definitely think people with disabilities should be given what they need but I think free access to public transport is sufficient to get around in 95% of the country (obviously excluding those whose disability makes public transport non viable who get funding for taxis etc anyway in theory), obviously it isn't fair to just expect people walk/cycle everywhere but I think the amount a taxi costs isn't really necessary, there are plenty of people doing without cars in the world
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    (Original post by doodle_333)
    some difference yes, although I'd love to be able to drive, financially it's just not viable (and trust me it's not my choice to be poor)... I definitely think people with disabilities should be given what they need but I think free access to public transport is sufficient to get around in 95% of the country (obviously excluding those whose disability makes public transport non viable who get funding for taxis etc anyway in theory), obviously it isn't fair to just expect people walk/cycle everywhere but I think the amount a taxi costs isn't really necessary, there are plenty of people doing without cars in the world
    A non disabled person has the option of walking. A disabled person doesn't always have that option.
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    nope- their illness. their responsibility. nobody else's.
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    (Original post by Rather_Cynical)
    It already exists, bus/tube concessions and London Taxicard and other schemes exist. It just needs to be rolled out nationwide, and better tailored to mental and neurological health conditions (not just physical health conditions).
    the COncessionary travel scheme exists nationally, and is open to anyone whose GP / consultant is happy to put to paper that they are unable to drive due to a disability / long term condition
 
 
 
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