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    So... just wondering if anyone attending this forum is in the process of doing or has graduated from this course? If so, how valuable did you find it in terms of what was learnt and in finding work afterwards within software development? What programming languages did it primarily emphasise and how heavily did coding feature during the course?

    I've already been accepted on this course (and a number of equivalents, e.g. at Bristol and Birmingham), and live in Glasgow currently, so I would like some insight as to how valuable it is.
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    *bumps*
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    Looking at the course lists, especially programming and advanced programming, I think the main language to be used will be Java. I'm about to start there so don't know for sure.
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    It is Java indeed. The course director has advised though that the project can be done in any language, subject to the course supervisor's approval, and for pre-course, it is recommended to experiment with Python. The only thing that makes me like the Birmingham equivalent of this course a bit more is that it has courses on statistical methods, but I think that's not a huge sticking point for me. Do let me know how it goes! If I do the course it'll most likely be next year.
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    I've been learning Python and Java anyway so there's a good start already.

    I'll let you know how it goes, but as you might start a year from now I may forget. Remind me if I don't get back to you then!
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    If you don't mind my asking, what age group do you fall into? I take it you have no prior coding experience then? What inspired you to do the course?
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    (Original post by TCA2b)
    If you don't mind my asking, what age group do you fall into? I take it you have no prior coding experience then? What inspired you to do the course?
    I'm provisionally (funding pending!) starting this course in September, and I'm 25 years old. I graduated from an arts undergrad in 2014 where I touched briefly on things like C++, and had done some electronics classes prior to that so had looked at Assembly and a little Python.

    I've been learning arts-orientated coding in languages like Processing (written in Java), Javascript and C# for fun the past year or so and I've been enjoying it so much I figured it would make sense to study CS further. This course seems to be the most open for those who did non-CS undergrads, and it seems pretty comprehensive in giving an overview of general software development topics. I sorta know someone who graduated from this course a few years ago and he seems to have a pretty good job doing something in software.
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    (Original post by TCA2b)
    If you don't mind my asking, what age group do you fall into? I take it you have no prior coding experience then? What inspired you to do the course?
    I'm 25 and have been working the past two years in e-commerce, doing a lot of tech support there too. I've also been teaching myself programming with python and find it really interesting, and like playing around with Linux and learning the command line.

    The course at Glasgow seems quite comprehensive, and it's a well acclaimed university.

    What about you?
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    I will be attending the course on September but I never heard anything about Python. I have never learned anything about the language.

    I have asked the professor who is responsible for the course, that Programming and Advanced Programming are in Java.
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    Yup, that is correct, Java is the primary language used for it.

    As for me, no coding experience, though I plan on getting some before starting the course, maybe in Python or Ruby. I'm around the same age as the ages mentioned in the thread, but a bit older, so just hopeful that it's still not too late to make the move to software development!
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    (Original post by TCA2b)
    Yup, that is correct, Java is the primary language used for it.

    As for me, no coding experience, though I plan on getting some before starting the course, maybe in Python or Ruby. I'm around the same age as the ages mentioned in the thread, but a bit older, so just hopeful that it's still not too late to make the move to software development!
    I have little experience as a web developer and java development and I am 28 years old, so join the club!
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    Yeah I knew a guy from my previous job (magento web developer) who did a similar IT course at Glasgow Uni, coming from HR at about age 30, so no it's not too late! I guess it comes down to how much effort we put into the degree!
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    (Original post by pr_euler)
    Yeah I knew a guy from my previous job (magento web developer) who did a similar IT course at Glasgow Uni, coming from HR at about age 30, so no it's not too late! I guess it comes down to how much effort we put into the degree!
    See?

    I had my doubts whether I wanted to be a developer but as long you like something, you should not put any limitations to yourself.
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    (Original post by TCA2b)
    So... just wondering if anyone attending this forum is in the process of doing or has graduated from this course? If so, how valuable did you find it in terms of what was learnt and in finding work afterwards within software development? What programming languages did it primarily emphasise and how heavily did coding feature during the course?

    I've already been accepted on this course (and a number of equivalents, e.g. at Bristol and Birmingham), and live in Glasgow currently, so I would like some insight as to how valuable it is.
    (Original post by pr_euler)
    Looking at the course lists, especially programming and advanced programming, I think the main language to be used will be Java. I'm about to start there so don't know for sure.
    (Original post by kingdomlevel)
    I'm provisionally (funding pending!) starting this course in September, and I'm 25 years old. I graduated from an arts undergrad in 2014 where I touched briefly on things like C++, and had done some electronics classes prior to that so had looked at Assembly and a little Python.

    I've been learning arts-orientated coding in languages like Processing (written in Java), Javascript and C# for fun the past year or so and I've been enjoying it so much I figured it would make sense to study CS further. This course seems to be the most open for those who did non-CS undergrads, and it seems pretty comprehensive in giving an overview of general software development topics. I sorta know someone who graduated from this course a few years ago and he seems to have a pretty good job doing something in software.
    (Original post by Evgenia_N)
    I will be attending the course on September but I never heard anything about Python. I have never learned anything about the language.

    I have asked the professor who is responsible for the course, that Programming and Advanced Programming are in Java.
    Hi guys!

    I know that its nearly a whole year since the last post, but hopefully you'll get some kind of notification for my message, as I have a few questions

    I will be enrolling this September for MSc Information Technology at Glasgow, and I have messaged the computing department director/admin email a few times over the last couple of months, with no response

    1. Firstly, what exactly is the difference between the Information Technology course and Software Development? The only differences I can see is that there are more core modules on SD than IT, but ultimately, they are all the same modules.

    2. Do you recommend any books for summer reading? I have contacted the uni and asked for a list, but again, no response. It has been 7 years since I last programmed (Higher Computing at school), and I'm pretty rusty! Also, any reading recommendations for the other non-programming modules?

    3. What is the timetable like? I appreciate that timetables change every year, but I'd like a kind of rough idea of what I should expect, as I currently work back shift in a supermarket, and would like to continue working throughout my studies, but I start at 4pm, so may have to speak to my manager about changing shifts or, ultimately, quit :/

    4. How heavy is the work load? I am sure the course will be exceptionally intensive, and I will be dedicating the next twelve months to it, but is the possibility of a social life, and a full 8 hours of sleep at night a far fetched dream?

    5. What are your own career prospects? Are you looking for a job in programming/software engineering etc.? Wanting to combine your undergraduate degree with computing in a job? PhD research? I personally have a psychology bachelors, and one option at the very bottom of my list is combining these for PhD research. Do you think this could be a possibility with regards to the topics covered, or is it very basic and generalised?

    6. If you have any advice at all, regarding anything at all, it would be greatly, greatly appreciated!
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    I am only starting next September, but from what contact I have had with the university, they recommended practising on Python, as have many others.
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    (Original post by TCA2b)
    I am only starting next September, but from what contact I have had with the university, they recommended practising on Python, as have many others.
    Oh okay, so you posted 2016, and you'll be starting 2018? Damn, I really want to talk to current students/graduates about my concerns
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    Yeah, you can defer twice in a row. I am just saving up money at present, I work in quite a lucrative job, so want to get as much out of it as possible before taking off time to study.
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    Hey, good choice picking Glasgow uni, it's great. The course is very practical. I'm on the Software Development course, just finished exams some weeks ago and working on my summer project. So you from Glasgow?

    1. Firstly, what exactly is the difference between the Information Technology course and Software Development? The only differences I can see is that there are more core modules on SD than IT, but ultimately, they are all the same modules.

    Just a couple of modules that are mandatory for SD and not IT in semester 2, including Advanced Programming, Algorithms and Data Structures and Software Engineering. You can switch from IT to SD (or vice versa) later on in Semester 1 if you wish.

    2. Do you recommend any books for summer reading? I have contacted the uni and asked for a list, but again, no response. It has been 7 years since I last programmed (Higher Computing at school), and I'm pretty rusty! Also, any reading recommendations for the other non-programming modules?

    There is a course called Systems and Networks that deals with really low level computer architecture stuff, for which I highly recommend Paul Petzold's book Code, an excellent primer on the subject as it's a fairly complex course. Otherwise all the subjects assume you've come from no prior computing knowledge. Learn to start using git and Github, as it's excellent for organising your code and transferring it between machines. You will use it on the course.

    3. What is the timetable like? I appreciate that timetables change every year, but I'd like a kind of rough idea of what I should expect, as I currently work back shift in a supermarket, and would like to continue working throughout my studies, but I start at 4pm, so may have to speak to my manager about changing shifts or, ultimately, quit :/

    It's a busy timetable. For me, I was able to work hard during the week and take most of the weekends off to spend time with the gf. If everything is new, buckle down hard at the beginning so you don't get left behind, and you'll be fine.

    4. How heavy is the work load? I am sure the course will be exceptionally intensive, and I will be dedicating the next twelve months to it, but is the possibility of a social life, and a full 8 hours of sleep at night a far fetched dream?

    Social life and sleeping well is no problem. The coursework is fairly well spread out. The 20 credit introduction to programming class is worth its weight in gold in terms of grades, Enterprise Cyber Security is gonna be a slog though, brace yourself for that


    5. What are your own career prospects? Are you looking for a job in programming/software engineering etc.? Wanting to combine your undergraduate degree with computing in a job? PhD research? I personally have a psychology bachelors, and one option at the very bottom of my list is combining these for PhD research. Do you think this could be a possibility with regards to the topics covered, or is it very basic and generalised?

    PhD, job, etc all open to you. Start applying for internships/graduate jobs by November while you still have time, as all exams will be in May and you won't have time to do it then what with studying for 10 subjects. I had my internship and graduate job offers before exams even finished. The internship interviewed in December and the graduate job in February.

    6. If you have any advice at all, regarding anything at all, it would be greatly, greatly appreciated!

    Enjoy the course, it's excellent fun and you learn so much from it! Avoid Cyber Security Fundamentals elective subject in semester 2, it may sound exciting but is actually pants. I cannot recommend Internet Technology enough, it really rounds off the degree in giving you a solid foundation in Web app development using Django. There's a lot of practical work involved, but it's well worth it.

    Any other questions just give me a shout
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    (Original post by pr_euler)
    Hey, good choice picking Glasgow uni, it's great. The course is very practical. I'm on the Software Development course, just finished exams some weeks ago and working on my summer project. So you from Glasgow?

    1. Firstly, what exactly is the difference between the Information Technology course and Software Development? The only differences I can see is that there are more core modules on SD than IT, but ultimately, they are all the same modules.

    Just a couple of modules that are mandatory for SD and not IT in semester 2, including Advanced Programming, Algorithms and Data Structures and Software Engineering. You can switch from IT to SD (or vice versa) later on in Semester 1 if you wish.

    2. Do you recommend any books for summer reading? I have contacted the uni and asked for a list, but again, no response. It has been 7 years since I last programmed (Higher Computing at school), and I'm pretty rusty! Also, any reading recommendations for the other non-programming modules?

    There is a course called Systems and Networks that deals with really low level computer architecture stuff, for which I highly recommend Paul Petzold's book Code, an excellent primer on the subject as it's a fairly complex course. Otherwise all the subjects assume you've come from no prior computing knowledge. Learn to start using git and Github, as it's excellent for organising your code and transferring it between machines. You will use it on the course.

    3. What is the timetable like? I appreciate that timetables change every year, but I'd like a kind of rough idea of what I should expect, as I currently work back shift in a supermarket, and would like to continue working throughout my studies, but I start at 4pm, so may have to speak to my manager about changing shifts or, ultimately, quit :/

    It's a busy timetable. For me, I was able to work hard during the week and take most of the weekends off to spend time with the gf. If everything is new, buckle down hard at the beginning so you don't get left behind, and you'll be fine.

    4. How heavy is the work load? I am sure the course will be exceptionally intensive, and I will be dedicating the next twelve months to it, but is the possibility of a social life, and a full 8 hours of sleep at night a far fetched dream?

    Social life and sleeping well is no problem. The coursework is fairly well spread out. The 20 credit introduction to programming class is worth its weight in gold in terms of grades, Enterprise Cyber Security is gonna be a slog though, brace yourself for that


    5. What are your own career prospects? Are you looking for a job in programming/software engineering etc.? Wanting to combine your undergraduate degree with computing in a job? PhD research? I personally have a psychology bachelors, and one option at the very bottom of my list is combining these for PhD research. Do you think this could be a possibility with regards to the topics covered, or is it very basic and generalised?

    PhD, job, etc all open to you. Start applying for internships/graduate jobs by November while you still have time, as all exams will be in May and you won't have time to do it then what with studying for 10 subjects. I had my internship and graduate job offers before exams even finished. The internship interviewed in December and the graduate job in February.

    6. If you have any advice at all, regarding anything at all, it would be greatly, greatly appreciated!

    Enjoy the course, it's excellent fun and you learn so much from it! Avoid Cyber Security Fundamentals elective subject in semester 2, it may sound exciting but is actually pants. I cannot recommend Internet Technology enough, it really rounds off the degree in giving you a solid foundation in Web app development using Django. There's a lot of practical work involved, but it's well worth it.

    Any other questions just give me a shout
    Hi, thank you so much for getting back to me! It is greatly appreciated I live about an hour drive away, but I'll be taking public transport that will take me to about 4-5 hours each day just spent on travel. Unless you know of anywhere that I can park that won't cost too much? I was thinking about parking near a subway station, and getting off at Hillhead, but I don't know Glasgow too well.

    When you said "you won't have time to do it then what with studying for 10 subjects", are you saying that all semester 1 and 2 exams are sat at the one time? :O

    What would you say is the average student age? And are there many females on the course?

    And what is your summer project on? And what are yours, and other students career prospects?
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    Hillhead is pretty close to the university, but good luck finding parking in that area of the city. You might have greater luck finding parking in nearby Hyndland, or possibly Partick; they're a 10 - 20 min walk from the uni.

    Anyway, they're all good questions (and answers.)

    @pr_euler Have most people in your class had success in securing roles within computing? Also, is a mathematical mind required for the course?

    I always get fairly divided answers on that, including from university professors. Incidentally, one of the appeals of the Birmingham masters to me was the fact that it had a course on statistics, but I have no desire to attend university there, or pay the high prices London unis charge as an alternative.

    As for the projects undertaken as part of the course, do these include placements or projects within industry?
 
 
 
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