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    Hi, I wasn't sure where to post this thread - I wanted it anon.

    I come from an area in the UK which has a very strong regional and recognizable accent. It's a working-class accent I suppose, and as such I have noticed that even in this area, the accent is diluted the higher up the ''social class'' you are. It's not an common accent that I see as being common among the very successful i.e. government/medical etc although I have heard soft variations of it in terms of some MPs and business people.

    Anyway, my question: I'm heading into a professional career and I want to 'clean up' my accent. I tend to drop H's/T's/G's etc ( e.g."aven't you?", "E-an" - eaten!!, "avin" - having!!) etc. I read it's something to do with a ''glottal stop'' (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jUIRa0T0BV8)

    I also over-emphasize I's ("profiiit" which I actually say as "profiiii" because I drop the T as well). I have been corrected on this by someone who said it should be pronounced "profet" - in other words, a soft i sound rather than the hard i sound at the start of a word like "indirect".

    Anyway, I make loads of these mistakes - I don't even realize until people point them out. I work in quite a professional middle class dominated environment and I'm from a council estate with a regional accent. I want rid of it for my own career progression and basically to be taken more seriously.

    So my question - how do you go about teaching yourself to reduce/remove a regional accent?

    Thanks v much!
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    I'm not sure it's something you can really 'teach yourself' as such. Exposure to more 'proper' ways of speaking in your everyday life is the only real way it will change naturally - though it is possible to kinda fake it with a conscious effort.
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    • Thread Starter
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    (Original post by Alexion)
    I'm not sure it's something you can really 'teach yourself' as such. Exposure to more 'proper' ways of speaking in your everyday life is the only real way it will change naturally - though it is possible to kinda fake it with a conscious effort.
    This might sound a bit sad, but I've been watching youtube clips of primeministers and the like and trying to pick up on the way that they pronounce their vowels mostly. I'm aware of the mistakes with my consonants - like dropping a T and I can correct myself mid-sentence because those are obvious to me. But I don't even know the ''correct'' way to pronounce vowel sounds, for instance, I've pronounced 'government' my entire life as "guvermn" (hard U in the middle and dropped T at the end). I fixed the dropped T recently but listening to the people around me - they don't say 'U' at all - they say is as "O" like in 'orange' so their 'government' is "gOvermnt" and mine is gUverment".

    I'm just wary of swapping my vowel sounds for a more RP sound and ending up sounding like Ross from friends when he faked a British accent in a lecture. Basically I don't want to sound like even more of a **** than I do. I guess it a case of phasing it in gradually.
 
 
 
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