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    Hello, hopefully this is the best place to put this. I'd appreciate some advice on pursuing a management consultancy career, whether strategy or lower down, depending on how high I can climb.

    Current situation - 2nd year Durham undergraduate English Literature student, seemingly on track for First. As you'd expect, humanities background, A*AA A Levels in humanities, only a C at GCSE Maths to my name. I know. Good EC's though.

    Over the last couple of years I've become very interested in consulatancy and have been reading into it as a practice, books like 'The McKinsey Mind', 'Perspecives on Strategy' etc., and it interests me a lot. I have good uni extra curriculars on my CV, although I kind of missed the boat with formal internships this summer. I generally feel I'm a bit behind in preparing myself for making competetive applications.

    In anticipation of applying, I imagine the quantitative side of my CV is weak and will seriously hold me back, despite being strong in humanities and ECs. What's a good next step to take for compensating for this? I've been self-studying maths myself at home, but are there recognised courses in maths you can do over the summer to put on your CV to try and boost it? I was also considering pursuing a post-graduate degree that's more consulting-friendly such as a Masters in Management, or the Birkbeck Economics Graduate Diploma, (which apparently is designed for people with non-economics educational backgrounds).

    Does anyone have any experince in these degree programmes? Or knows of a way to work towards not looking like you're useless with numbers?
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    (Original post by Giotto)
    Hello, hopefully this is the best place to put this. I'd appreciate some advice on pursuing a management consultancy career, whether strategy or lower down, depending on how high I can climb.

    Current situation - 2nd year Durham undergraduate English Literature student, seemingly on track for First. As you'd expect, humanities background, A*AA A Levels in humanities, only a C at GCSE Maths to my name. I know. Good EC's though.

    Over the last couple of years I've become very interested in consulatancy and have been reading into it as a practice, books like 'The McKinsey Mind', 'Perspecives on Strategy' etc., and it interests me a lot. I have good uni extra curriculars on my CV, although I kind of missed the boat with formal internships this summer. I generally feel I'm a bit behind in preparing myself for making competetive applications.

    In anticipation of applying, I imagine the quantitative side of my CV is weak and will seriously hold me back, despite being strong in humanities and ECs. What's a good next step to take for compensating for this? I've been self-studying maths myself at home, but are there recognised courses in maths you can do over the summer to put on your CV to try and boost it? I was also considering pursuing a post-graduate degree that's more consulting-friendly such as a Masters in Management, or the Birkbeck Economics Graduate Diploma, (which apparently is designed for people with non-economics educational backgrounds).

    Does anyone have any experince in these degree programmes? Or knows of a way to work towards not looking like you're useless with numbers?
    Just apply, don't bother with doing a masters.

    If you want to sharpen your numerical skills do some practice GMAT questions, practice numerical tests online, practice case interviews etc.

    Nothing you have said so far has indicated that you are at a disadvantage - so chill.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Just apply, don't bother with doing a masters.

    If you want to sharpen your numerical skills do some practice GMAT questions, practice numerical tests online, practice case interviews etc.

    Nothing you have said so far has indicated that you are at a disadvantage - so chill.

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    So quant qualifications aren't really that important? Is it more down to the numerical tests they give you?
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    (Original post by Giotto)
    So quant qualifications aren't really that important? Is it more down to the numerical tests they give you?
    No, they're really not. The stuff you do in consulting isn't rocket science. If you can add, subtract, divide, reason about numerical concepts, multiply and do some very basic algebra (like present value calculations etc), you're good. The trouble is doing that in your head and at a decent enough pace.

    Numerical tests, problem solving tests and case interviews will all involve some basic maths.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
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