Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Would you say it's better to go to a highly ranked/russell group university to study a generic subject e.g. history, english, chemistry etc that doesn't lead to a direct career or a lower ranked uni to study a course that almost guarantees a job e.g. engineering, nursing, optometry, audiology etc.
    Right now I have an offer to study chemistry at a highly ranked uni but also an offer to study chemical engineering at a less prestigious (but not bad) uni and i'm not sure what to go for
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Depends on whether you want to do those jobs. If you want to work in chemical engineering, then choose the chemical engineering degree but if you want to do something generic then maybe go for the chemistry degree at the good uni.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Sara_t)
    Would you say it's better to go to a highly ranked/russell group university to study a generic subject e.g. history, english, chemistry etc that doesn't lead to a direct career or a lower ranked uni to study a course that almost guarantees a job e.g. engineering, nursing, optometry, audiology etc.
    Right now I have an offer to study chemistry at a highly ranked uni but also an offer to study chemical engineering at a less prestigious (but not bad) uni and i'm not sure what to go for
    Better for what?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Course is always the most important. If you have passion for the course, you can become great no matter the uni.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Trapz99)
    Depends on whether you want to do those jobs. If you want to work in chemical engineering, then choose the chemical engineering degree but if you want to do something generic then maybe go for the chemistry degree at the good uni.
    This

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    In terms of employability, your skills and experience will make a huge difference.. Doing a generic course may demonstrate your intelligence but doesn't give you practical job skills so in my opinion i would chose chemical engineering and make sure you do work experience before graduating then you'll be sorted
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Hevachan)
    In terms of employability, your skills and experience will make a huge difference.. Doing a generic course may demonstrate your intelligence but doesn't give you practical job skills so in my opinion i would chose chemical engineering and make sure you do work experience before graduating then you'll be sorted
    Chem eng doesn't afford one intrinsic skills that a general academic wouldn't, outside of becoming the vocation of the degree, it doesn't matter much what you study. I agree with your work experience and skills points though

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    Depends entirely on the career. And more specifically the people who are looking at your CV.

    I'll be studying Computer Forensics at Uni. If I applied to a company that specifically wanted a forensics degree then I'm in a better position than someone with a generic IT related degree (assuming similar grades). I'll be at Portsmouth and would also likely be better off than someone from a Russel Group, again assuming similar grades and that the company was more interested in a forensics degree specifically. Computer Forensics as a career doesn't always require a specific degree though, so comparing completely equal students on the same courses from Oxford and Portsmouth for example would likely fall in favour of Oxford (but of course there are many, many factors to influence decisions).

    If on the other hand I didn't need a specific degree then a good degree from a Russel Group will likely look better. Even a 2:1 at Cambridge might look as good as a First somewhere else.

    But this is all completely subjective depending on what you want to do and the people that will be deciding if you're a good fit. Even within a career, some companies might want one thing and other companies want another.


    My advice is to ignore everything above and go to the University you like most that offers you the most. I applied to Southampton and later decided the course wasn't right for me. I applied to Portsmouth after the initial applications in January had closed and withdrew my application from Southampton. While Southampton had slightly nicer/more modern facilities I didn't have any contact with their staff. No emails, no questions regarding my application, nothing to even acknowledge I'd withdrawn. Portsmouth were super helpful, super nice and replied really promptly. I applied to 2 courses on a Saturday, had an unconditional offer for one when I woke up on Monday and the second on Wednesday. They have since proven to be overall nicer, friendlier and generally offer a nicer environment. I advise you to go for whatever you feel is best. Because I certainly don't feel I'd have been in any way advantaged by going to Southampton over Portsmouth.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
    Useful resources
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.