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    I'm thinking of being a doctor when I'm older, but I'm not sure if I enjoy biology enough. I love chemistry and physics, but biology just bores me. I get good grades, I think, I mostly get A's and sometimes B's if I don't revise for certain tests. I don't mind the idea of biology A level, its just the idea of another 5/6 years of it afterwards. How much different is biology at GCSE to A level? Also, is it even worth me wanting to be a doctor if I don't enjoy biology the same way I enjoy chemistry or physics?
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    You will do a lot of biology when training to be a doctor because your understanding of it is key to your training. However, remember that studying biology at school is very different from studying it at uni which is more hands on and applied.
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    (Original post by kimstudying)
    I'm thinking of being a doctor when I'm older, but I'm not sure if I enjoy biology enough. I love chemistry and physics, but biology just bores me. I get good grades, I think, I mostly get A's and sometimes B's if I don't revise for certain tests. I don't mind the idea of biology A level, its just the idea of another 5/6 years of it afterwards. How much different is biology at GCSE to A level? Also, is it even worth me wanting to be a doctor if I don't enjoy biology the same way I enjoy chemistry or physics?
    Which aspect of biology bores you? If it's learning about food chains and so on, then okay fair enough, that's probably less important for medical school.

    On the other hand, if learning about the cardiac cycle, proteins, carbohydrates, the sliding filament theory, cellular respiration etc utterly and absolutely bores you, then I think you should look into alternative courses.

    Medical school is there to teach you medicine - not biology. We don't do five years of pure biology learning and there's generally minimal lab work. However, applied human biology still underpins much of what doctors do on the job, and it will be the bulk of your first two years of teaching as a medical student, so if you dislike that, you're going to be pretty bored.
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    Chemistry is more important, but you need to know Biology as well.
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    (Original post by fg45344)
    Chemistry is more important, but you need to know Biology as well.
    It's important only to meet the entry requirements and get an offer. After that it's beyond irrelevant.
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    I think all medical schools require an A level in biology (along with chemistry) as part of their entry requirements, so yes it is important. The course itself has alot of biology involved so that's something to consider if you don't like the subject. A level biology compared to GCSE goes into more detail and there's more content to learn. I revised the night before for my biology exams and got an A*...there is NO way I could have done that at A level purely because there is so much to learn.
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    (Original post by kimstudying)
    I'm thinking of being a doctor when I'm older, but I'm not sure if I enjoy biology enough. I love chemistry and physics, but biology just bores me. I get good grades, I think, I mostly get A's and sometimes B's if I don't revise for certain tests. I don't mind the idea of biology A level, its just the idea of another 5/6 years of it afterwards. How much different is biology at GCSE to A level? Also, is it even worth me wanting to be a doctor if I don't enjoy biology the same way I enjoy chemistry or physics?
    That's like saying is a pan that important if i want to be a chef?
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    On the other hand, if learning about the cardiac cycle, proteins, carbohydrates, the sliding filament theory, cellular respiration etc utterly and absolutely bores you, then I think you should look into alternative courses
    Crap. I think it's a little late for me to change my degree...

    It really depends on how much you hate biology. I didn't really enjoy spending two years learning about iron metabolism and oncogenes, but I got through it. It's important to have that basic science background to build on and learn clinical medicine, but medicine is very much a vocational degree. If you think you will enjoy the job then you should go for it. It's a fact of medical education that you have to learn a lot of things that won't end up being relevant to what you end up doing. Just keep the final job in mind and push through
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    (Original post by Ghotay)
    Crap. I think it's a little late for me to change my degree...

    It really depends on how much you hate biology. I didn't really enjoy spending two years learning about iron metabolism and oncogenes, but I got through it. It's important to have that basic science background to build on and learn clinical medicine, but medicine is very much a vocational degree. If you think you will enjoy the job then you should go for it. It's a fact of medical education that you have to learn a lot of things that won't end up being relevant to what you end up doing. Just keep the final job in mind and push through
    Did it utterly and absolutely bore you though? Utterly and absolutely? No interest whatsoever? Might as well have been sitting in a fire safety talk?

    I think we all moan a lot about how dry and boring pre-clinical medicine is, and yeah compared to the practical side of things it is. But surely you have some general interest and curiosity about the human body and life sciences?

    I'm not trying to say that I think everyone needs to be fascinated by every minute detail of pre-clin - I certainly wasn't. The point I was trying to make to the OP is that if she utterly loathes the idea of learning anatomy, physiology and biochemistry in sixth form, then signing up to an advanced course of further study in those very fields wouldn't be in her best interests!
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    Biology and Chemistry are the main subjects in becoming a doctor, or mostly anything in the field of medicine.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Did it utterly and absolutely bore you though? Utterly and absolutely? No interest whatsoever? Might as well have been sitting in a fire safety talk?

    I think we all moan a lot about how dry and boring pre-clinical medicine is, and yeah compared to the practical side of things it is. But surely you have some general interest and curiosity about the human body and life sciences?

    I'm not trying to say that I think everyone needs to be fascinated by every minute detail of pre-clin - I certainly wasn't. The point I was trying to make to the OP is that if she utterly loathes the idea of learning anatomy, physiology and biochemistry in sixth form, then signing up to an advanced course of further study in those very fields wouldn't be in her best interests!
    I think most people egg up how much they actually disliked pre-clinical medicine. It isn't that bad. Sure, you might prefer a certain subject but that's just life - it's the same for clinical medicine, but people don't say "oh boy, I really hate clinical medicine" if they don't like gastro. I doubt anybody truly hates the all-encompassing subject of pre-clinical medicine.
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    Human Biology YES ofcourseBut things like Plants and ecology is not relevant to the medical course, not even 1%. This part of biology is important in other subjects like pharmacology but not medicine.
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    (Original post by kimstudying)
    I'm thinking of being a doctor when I'm older, but I'm not sure if I enjoy biology enough. I love chemistry and physics, but biology just bores me. I get good grades, I think, I mostly get A's and sometimes B's if I don't revise for certain tests. I don't mind the idea of biology A level, its just the idea of another 5/6 years of it afterwards. How much different is biology at GCSE to A level? Also, is it even worth me wanting to be a doctor if I don't enjoy biology the same way I enjoy chemistry or physics?
    I have just completed my first year at medical school and pretty much our whole curiculum is human biology, biochemistry, pharmacology and psychology with a bit of maths and sociology pushed in. Its around 50% biology containing topics such as genetics, muscle contraction, DNA synthesis/replication, function of the heart, functions of the kidneys etc.

    If you enjoy human biology then medicine may be a good idea for you, but you will indeed be very bored and unsatisfied if human biology isnt your thing because you will need to learn a lot about it during your preclinical years for use in clinical years.
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    (Original post by kimstudying)
    I'm thinking of being a doctor when I'm older, but I'm not sure if I enjoy biology enough. I love chemistry and physics, but biology just bores me. I get good grades, I think, I mostly get A's and sometimes B's if I don't revise for certain tests. I don't mind the idea of biology A level, its just the idea of another 5/6 years of it afterwards. How much different is biology at GCSE to A level? Also, is it even worth me wanting to be a doctor if I don't enjoy biology the same way I enjoy chemistry or physics?
    Hi kimstudying

    Have you already chosen your A levels? I am guessing that you probably haven't yet.

    I thought I may able to offer some advice. For studying medicine you will need a full A-level in chemistry for any university. Regarding biology, whilst it is not absolutely essential, it is highly recommended and most people who do go onto study medicine have done an A-level on biology. It is also a very good basis for your further study and is likely to make the first year easier for you.

    However, with that all said, if you have already chosen and have decided not to go for biology, it is certainly still worth applying for medicine.

    If you are still uncertain and would like some more tips about the best A-levels to choose to go on to have a career in medicine, you might find this blog post interesting.

    Good luck with your choices. I'm sure you'll make the right decision.

    UniAdmissions
 
 
 
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