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Issues for studying in the UK from 2017/18 for an EU student Watch

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    Hello!I've been reading countless of articles about the Brexit and how it will probably turn out for the students. I myself am a prospective student from the EU looking to study International Relations or something Security-related in the United Kingdom. I have a few friends who were also planning to study different courses but are, one by one, discarding the country as a possibility due to safety and money issues.My biggest concern is that student loans will not be available to us, prospective UG students starting in 2017/18. I want to study one of the abovementioned courses in the UK because I believe that the professors and guest lecturers are one of the best in the world and the roleplaying exercises are top-notch. I already have my IELTS exams scheduled for the end of the month so there's no going back.Another concern I have is that many universities have ties to EU organisations. They provide many internship positions. If Brexit is to occur, will these possibilities for work experience be eliminated? Even for EU students?I want to ask you, fellow prospective EU students, what are your thoughts on these matters? Are you discouraged in any way by Brexit? If so, please elaborate.PS. TSR doesn't allow me to have paragraphs.
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    Not an EU student. But nothing has been announced at all about EU students. Nothing, in general, would be happening for a few years yet anyway.
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    At this moment the absolute earliest Brexit could happen is 14 July 2018, and is likely to be several months later at least. Many UK universities are putting out messages saying current EU students will be unaffected at the point at which Brexit occurs.

    We have a new Prime Minister, and a new Cabinet is being announced over the next few hours. It is far, far too early to be talking about the outcomes of any new post-Brexit policies.

    Please stop worrying, and go ahead and apply to UK universities. You're welcome here. There are no more safety issues than anywhere else, so that should not be a factor in your decision-making.
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    I expect most of the best academics will leave Britain for more opportunities in the EU so there is little point coming to the UK for study since most of the best people would be in the EU anyway.
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    (Original post by Duncan2012)
    At this moment the absolute earliest Brexit could happen is 14 July 2018, and is likely to be several months later at least. Many UK universities are putting out messages saying current EU students will be unaffected at the point at which Brexit occurs.

    We have a new Prime Minister, and a new Cabinet is being announced over the next few hours. It is far, far too early to be talking about the outcomes of any new post-Brexit policies.

    Please stop worrying, and go ahead and apply to UK universities. You're welcome here. There are no more safety issues than anywhere else, so that should not be a factor in your decision-making.
    That's true, but it was said for 2016 applicants and not those from next year. And by "safety" I meant the rising cases of xenophobia towards Eastern Europeans by British people.
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    This deeply saddens me to read. I'd just like to apologise for the disgusting pigs that unfortunately reside in this once great country. I'd like to reassure you that the horrific xenophobia you see on the news is barely shared by 5% of the population who are spiteful brats who do not understand the first thing about celebrating different cultures. In terms of studying here, the student population who voted in the referendum almost all voted to stay in the EU, are welcoming and well educated people who have ambition and direction and are open to learning about new cultures. The main xenophobia (and people who voted to leave the EU) appears from the elderly generations of about 70-90 year olds and some of the working class, who are less educated and often unemployed. I don't mean to make excuses or anything, but the xenophobia stems from fear mainly. They simply don't like different cultures as they either don't understand it, or don't like change.

    I encourage you to look into the voting statistics (a good source is the BBC news website) and it shows the areas that voted to leave or remain. It also have graphs showing the difference in age and education of the voters supporting the comments I have just made. Bare in mind the vote was 52% to 48%, so basically half the country we're still in favour of remaining in the EU. There are lots of large cities such as Manchester, Birmingham, London, Liverpool, Edinburgh and Bristol that often have 3 or 4 universities per city but also large migrant populations. The residents are generally welcoming towards migrants since they are so used to seeing them around the city.

    Don't worry we haven't regressed into our barbarian history, we are still a civilised and, for the most part, peaceful people. Please don't rule out our country for studying as it would be a great loss on our part.


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    (Original post by Gezza_O'Brien)
    This deeply saddens me to read. I'd just like to apologise for the disgusting pigs that unfortunately reside in this once great country. I'd like to reassure you that the horrific xenophobia you see on the news is barely shared by 5% of the population who are spiteful brats who do not understand the first thing about celebrating different cultures. In terms of studying here, the student population who voted in the referendum almost all voted to stay in the EU, are welcoming and well educated people who have ambition and direction and are open to learning about new cultures. The main xenophobia (and people who voted to leave the EU) appears from the elderly generations of about 70-90 year olds and some of the working class, who are less educated and often unemployed. I don't mean to make excuses or anything, but the xenophobia stems from fear mainly. They simply don't like different cultures as they either don't understand it, or don't like change.

    I encourage you to look into the voting statistics (a good source is the BBC news website) and it shows the areas that voted to leave or remain. It also have graphs showing the difference in age and education of the voters supporting the comments I have just made. Bare in mind the vote was 52% to 48%, so basically half the country we're still in favour of remaining in the EU. There are lots of large cities such as Manchester, Birmingham, London, Liverpool, Edinburgh and Bristol that often have 3 or 4 universities per city but also large migrant populations. The residents are generally welcoming towards migrants since they are so used to seeing them around the city.

    Don't worry we haven't regressed into our barbarian history, we are still a civilised and, for the most part, peaceful people. Please don't rule out our country for studying as it would be a great loss on our part.


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    ^This post is a prime example why the left will struggle to ever be elected in the UK again. Nice way to completely generalise 17.4 million people. You wonder why we have lost so much of the working class to UKIP? It's people like you who push this extremist regressive liberalism which has incidentally played a part in the Brexit vote, and this has occurred through the mass demonisation of people who you deem inferior to you. You're an elitist, and at your core a bigot. As a socialist myself, someone who understands the worries and concerns of people in the areas you mentioned, you're a total embarrassment to our entire ideology.
 
 
 
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