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Additional time arrangements for LNAT puts applicants at a disadvantage? Watch

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    Hi,My daughter currently gets extra time for her A levels due to disability.

    She is thinking of applying to do Law at Oxford and Durham, both of which require applicants to take the LNAT test as part of this

    It is possible to apply for access requirements such as additional time, however it says on the LNAT website:"The LNAT universities to which you have applied will be informed of your examination access arrangements and will be able to take these into consideration when evaluating your LNAT result."

    So, this sounds like she might be at a disadvantage by having the extra time because they 'adjust' the result downwards. Is she best just doing it without the extra time and hope that she can write enough or be more concise?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by MJ6987)
    Hi,My daughter currently gets extra time for her A levels due to disability.She is thinking of applying to do Law at Oxford and Durham, both of which require applicants to take the LNAT test as part of thisIt is possible to apply for access requirements such as additional time, however it says on the LNAT website:"The LNAT universities to which you have applied will be informed of your examination access arrangements and will be able to take these into consideration when evaluating your LNAT result."So, this sounds like she might be at a disadvantage by having the extra time because they 'adjust' the result downwards. Is she best just doing it without the extra time and hope that she can write enough or be more concise?Thanks
    If they adjusted downwards then it would make allowing extra time redundant essentially, therefore i think that they mean for example if they know they have dyslexia, they will take into account that their grammar might be effected.
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    (Original post by claireestelle)
    If they adjusted downwards then it would make allowing extra time redundant essentially, therefore i think that they mean for example if they know they have dyslexia, they will take into account that their grammar might be effected.

    Yes, that what I thought which is why I thought it was a strange statement for them to make
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    (Original post by MJ6987)
    Hi,My daughter currently gets extra time for her A levels due to disability.She is thinking of applying to do Law at Oxford and Durham, both of which require applicants to take the LNAT test as part of thisIt is possible to apply for access requirements such as additional time, however it says on the LNAT website:"The LNAT universities to which you have applied will be informed of your examination access arrangements and will be able to take these into consideration when evaluating your LNAT result."So, this sounds like she might be at a disadvantage by having the extra time because they 'adjust' the result downwards. Is she best just doing it without the extra time and hope that she can write enough or be more concise?Thanks
    I guess this is an attempt to be able to more fairly compare applicants, since those given extra time could be having an unfair advantage. Although maybe it works the other way too, and universities may be able to see that you qualified for extra time and so be more lenient of things like spelling, but I doubt it. I also doubt that they would actually recalculate her result downwards though, just have it in their minds that she had more time to answer the questions than her competition.

    It's probably best for your daughter to practice some LNAT papers to see if she is struggling for time, and if not then don't apply for extra time. It's possible that at university she wouldn't get extra time (from what I understand, you have to be reassessed? Don't quote me on this though, I may be wrong) and certainly in real life after graduation she won't, so it's reasonable that universities should be made aware of the extra time she was given when deciding if she would be able to cope with the demands of the course and being a lawyer.
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    (Original post by dragonkeeper999)
    Don't quote me on this though, I may be wrong) and certainly in real life after graduation she won't, so it's reasonable that universities should be made aware of the extra time she was given when deciding if she would be able to cope with the demands of the course and being a lawyer.
    (Original post by MJ6987)
    Yes, that what I thought which is why I thought it was a strange statement for them to make
    Having not worked in legal services personally, i can't directly quote you on it but the equality act does allow for reasonable adjustments in the workplace and for you to sue employers under that act if they don't provide them. So i wouldn't go saying that to people unless you as a disabled person could say that or as someone in legal services, who had had that happen to them. As a dyslexic person myself, i have had many (and i m not saying you are one, ignorant users on tsr) tell me employers wont care or won't hire me or give my reasonable adjustments but so far I have had no evidence to say that they aren't willing to do so for me.
    She could certainly sue her university and take them to the education ombudsman if they weren't providing adjustment for her (if she has post 16 evidence, she won't need a reassessment, otherwise she will be but from my experience universities are more flexible than gcse/a level exam boards) .

    Although i agree with the advice of doing some practice papers to make the decision, advising someone not to use it out of fear, just makes some almost feel more ashamed to ask for help when an inclusive society is what the allowance of extra time should promote.

    Sorry, i realize that this might come across as an attack on your opinion, i dont mean it to be, but i dont want fellow disabled students living in fear of disclosing their diagnosis.
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    (Original post by MJ6987)
    Hi,My daughter currently gets extra time for her A levels due to disability.

    She is thinking of applying to do Law at Oxford and Durham, both of which require applicants to take the LNAT test as part of this

    It is possible to apply for access requirements such as additional time, however it says on the LNAT website:"The LNAT universities to which you have applied will be informed of your examination access arrangements and will be able to take these into consideration when evaluating your LNAT result."

    So, this sounds like she might be at a disadvantage by having the extra time because they 'adjust' the result downwards. Is she best just doing it without the extra time and hope that she can write enough or be more concise?

    Thanks
    You could read it the other way. It's quite possible they could see that your daughter has had extra time and take this in to consideration by having a lower score threshold for interview/offer. In the same way some universities give contextual offers to those from a disadvantaged background (I don't actually know this for certain, just saying it can be interpreted this way).

    But generally I don't think it will have any impact. They'll inform the universities just so that the university has it on record but it's unlikely to have any impact. They certainly won't discriminate because of it.

    But if you're concerned, contact Durham and Cambridge for confirmation. But if your daughter requires extra time for exams, she should definitely apply for the extra time for LNAT, she wants a score that reflects her abilities, not a lower score because she didn't have the time she requires.

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    (Original post by dragonkeeper999)
    I guess this is an attempt to be able to more fairly compare applicants, since those given extra time could be having an unfair advantage. Although maybe it works the other way too, and universities may be able to see that you qualified for extra time and so be more lenient of things like spelling, but I doubt it. I also doubt that they would actually recalculate her result downwards though, just have it in their minds that she had more time to answer the questions than her competition.

    It's probably best for your daughter to practice some LNAT papers to see if she is struggling for time, and if not then don't apply for extra time. It's possible that at university she wouldn't get extra time (from what I understand, you have to be reassessed? Don't quote me on this though, I may be wrong) and certainly in real life after graduation she won't, so it's reasonable that universities should be made aware of the extra time she was given when deciding if she would be able to cope with the demands of the course and being a lawyer.
    I think it's a bit of an overreaction to think universities will equate needing extra time to being unable to cope with university/life after graduation.
    Unless it's due to a temporary reason, if she got extra time at a level, its very likely she'll qualify for extra time at university. Extra time does not indicate a lack of ability, it simply compensates for the impact the disability has compared to non disabled students.


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    (Original post by MJ6987)
    Hi,My daughter currently gets extra time for her A levels due to disability.

    She is thinking of applying to do Law at Oxford and Durham, both of which require applicants to take the LNAT test as part of this

    It is possible to apply for access requirements such as additional time, however it says on the LNAT website:"The LNAT universities to which you have applied will be informed of your examination access arrangements and will be able to take these into consideration when evaluating your LNAT result."

    So, this sounds like she might be at a disadvantage by having the extra time because they 'adjust' the result downwards. Is she best just doing it without the extra time and hope that she can write enough or be more concise?

    Thanks
    Where in the quote you provided does it say they will adjust the result downwards? They are just saying the extenuating circumstances will be taking "into consideration". In other words, it provides a context for the applicants circumstances. It in no way means an applicant would be disadvantaged if they have a disability. For one thing, that would be illegal... (as others have mentioned).
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    Thanks all. I'm probably just worrying unnecessarily on her behalf. I just think that if they're making arrangements to level the playing field they don't then need to inform the universities as well as they are in danger of either cancelling out the extra time or "double counting" the benefit of it, depending how they take it into account.
 
 
 
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