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    Hi guys,

    I am starting my children's nursing degree in September and I was wondering if any current students can let me know things I should buy in advance that I will need for uni and/or on placements. I want to be as organised as possible!

    Thanks in advance for any tips.
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    I'm not a current student but starting in September, from the people i have spoke to we dont actually need to get all that much. Pens and notebook. Laptop or tablet. Nurses watch with seconds hand. All the books you need can be found in the uni library but the one book I was told to get if I could afford is a nurses dictionary. Hope this helps. X

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    (Original post by tracijune)
    Hi guys,

    I am starting my children's nursing degree in September and I was wondering if any current students can let me know things I should buy in advance that I will need for uni and/or on placements. I want to be as organised as possible!

    Thanks in advance for any tips.
    I'm a qualified children's nurse. Books are indeed available in the library. What I did, was take a book out from the library as a "Trial". If I liked the book, then I'd buy it. It meant I didn't waste money on bad books. Get hold of yourself some super comfy, black leather closed toe shoes - Clarks Unloops are a popular choice.

    You'll need a fob watch. If you have the money, invest in a Lorus. They have a luminous face for nights and are brilliant. Get yourself some nurse scissors too. (I use a pair of mini trauma-style ones)

    I'd also recommend a good water bottle. I swear by my 1L Camelbak Chute. They are expensive, but never leak and last forever (Smaller sizes are available!).

    Also, get some lip balm to keep in your tunic pocket and some hand cream for your bag. Ward areas are hot and dry and you'll want to keep your hands and lips from cracking. Stickers are a must have as a children's nurse. I keep some in my pocket at all times and they are absolutely invaluable.

    One thing to avoid is the pens that look like syringes. Yes they're good fun, but I think children would be scared by them!

    Hope that helps. Feel free to ask anything else!
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    I got the Clark's unloops - the ugliest shoes I have ever owned, but if they get my feet through 12 hour shifts I will wear them happily! I found a good wee light up watch on Amazon. The brand is Ravel. Was only £7.44 and free delivery.
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    I'm a qualified children's nurse. Books are indeed available in the library. What I did, was take a book out from the library as a "Trial". If I liked the book, then I'd buy it. It meant I didn't waste money on bad books. Get hold of yourself some super comfy, black leather closed toe shoes - Clarks Unloops are a popular choice.

    You'll need a fob watch. If you have the money, invest in a Lorus. They have a luminous face for nights and are brilliant. Get yourself some nurse scissors too. (I use a pair of mini trauma-style ones)

    I'd also recommend a good water bottle. I swear by my 1L Camelbak Chute. They are expensive, but never leak and last forever (Smaller sizes are available!).

    Also, get some lip balm to keep in your tunic pocket and some hand cream for your bag. Ward areas are hot and dry and you'll want to keep your hands and lips from cracking. Stickers are a must have as a children's nurse. I keep some in my pocket at all times and they are absolutely invaluable.

    One thing to avoid is the pens that look like syringes. Yes they're good fun, but I think children would be scared by them!

    Hope that helps. Feel free to ask anything else!
    sorry to gate crash your post.
    whats the first few weeks at uni like is there lots of essays and stuff. i am a mature student and quite worried about all of this.
    how many exams etc do you have in your first year?
    thanks xx
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    Thank you so much for the tips!


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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    I'm a qualified children's nurse. Books are indeed available in the library. What I did, was take a book out from the library as a "Trial". If I liked the book, then I'd buy it. It meant I didn't waste money on bad books. Get hold of yourself some super comfy, black leather closed toe shoes - Clarks Unloops are a popular choice.

    You'll need a fob watch. If you have the money, invest in a Lorus. They have a luminous face for nights and are brilliant. Get yourself some nurse scissors too. (I use a pair of mini trauma-style ones)

    I'd also recommend a good water bottle. I swear by my 1L Camelbak Chute. They are expensive, but never leak and last forever (Smaller sizes are available!).

    Also, get some lip balm to keep in your tunic pocket and some hand cream for your bag. Ward areas are hot and dry and you'll want to keep your hands and lips from cracking. Stickers are a must have as a children's nurse. I keep some in my pocket at all times and they are absolutely invaluable.

    One thing to avoid is the pens that look like syringes. Yes they're good fun, but I think children would be scared by them!

    Hope that helps. Feel free to ask anything else!

    Hey, is it true that its better to be an adult nurse rather than a child nurse because its easier to switch from adult to child rather than child to adult. Also, is it true that adult nurses can work with children-do they not get best of both worlds.?
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    Hey, is it true that its better to be an adult nurse rather than a child nurse because its easier to switch from adult to child rather than child to adult. Also, is it true that adult nurses can work with children-do they not get best of both worlds.?
    You have to do additional training to switch to either speciality as far as I know, so really you're just better going for which one you'd prefer.


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    (Original post by Lolly1888)
    sorry to gate crash your post.
    whats the first few weeks at uni like is there lots of essays and stuff. i am a mature student and quite worried about all of this.
    how many exams etc do you have in your first year?
    thanks xx
    Hi!

    No need to apologise. You haven't gate crashed at all.

    The first few weeks of university tend to just be an introduction to all the modules, assessment formats, degree level essay writing techniques, referencing, library inductions etc. There are unlikely to be any essays or exams in the first few weeks. There is a lot to take on board but to be honest most of that is logistical stuff, like where on the e-portal to find your modules and how to access your university email account and so on. It seems like a lot but you will learn it after a few months (Do put the effort/attention in here though. If you can find your way around the library quickly, you'll save yourself lots of precious time!)


    The number of assessments in first year will vary from uni to uni. I did about 4 essays, one MCQ exam and one practical exam. Alongside quite a few summative assesments like a group presentation.

    Don't panic about the assessments - that is honestly the worst thing you can do. Just prioritise your work based on due date, time needed and % grade etc and you will be fine. Manage your time well, be organised and plan in advance. Don't leave essays to the last minute - your grade will show it if you do. That is the best advice I can give you. You'll want to do well, obviously, but as long as you pass the degree, potential employers are not bothered about your classification so it won't affect you in the long term either. Good luck!
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    (Original post by tracijune)
    You have to do additional training to switch to either speciality as far as I know, so really you're just better going for which one you'd prefer.


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    No. My understanding is that from adult you can switch to children's, mental health, learning disability nursing via an 18 month course (These are increasingly limited, however). However you'd have to do another 3 years if you wanted to switch from children's to anything else.
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    Hey, is it true that its better to be an adult nurse rather than a child nurse because its easier to switch from adult to child rather than child to adult. Also, is it true that adult nurses can work with children-do they not get best of both worlds.?
    Neither role is "Better". Both are respectable, challenging roles but also incredibly different.

    Adult nurses can train to become Health Visitors, and can work in Children's A&E departments, and both paeds and neonatal intensive care units however this is becoming increasingly less common (Rightly so, if you ask me. Why let someone who has only ever nursed adults loose on an intubated premature baby with NEC!?). I work for a large NHS Trust in a Children's Hospital. Hospitals like us probably wouldn't even look at a newly-qualified adult trained nurse. Smaller Trusts that have paeds/neonatal services might consider an adult nurse purely based on the lower application rates for their vacancies. Hospitals like mine will receive thousands of applications per NQ intake, and therefore they have enough qualified children's nurses to choose from.

    Conversion courses of 18 months from adult to children's are still available although limited. That said, the transition would probably be tricky given how different the two fields are.

    You should do the field you most want to do! If you really can't decide there are some 4 year dual field degrees around
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    Neither role is "Better". Both are respectable, challenging roles but also incredibly different.

    Adult nurses can train to become Health Visitors, and can work in Children's A&E departments, and both paeds and neonatal intensive care units however this is becoming increasingly less common (Rightly so, if you ask me. Why let someone who has only ever nursed adults loose on an intubated premature baby with NEC!?). I work for a large NHS Trust in a Children's Hospital. Hospitals like us probably wouldn't even look at a newly-qualified adult trained nurse. Smaller Trusts that have paeds/neonatal services might consider an adult nurse purely based on the lower application rates for their vacancies. Hospitals like mine will receive thousands of applications per NQ intake, and therefore they have enough qualified children's nurses to choose from.

    Conversion courses of 18 months from adult to children's are still available although limited. That said, the transition would probably be tricky given how different the two fields are.



    You should do the field you most want to do! If you really can't decide there are some 4 year dual field degrees around
    Thanks for the reply.
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    Neither role is "Better". Both are respectable, challenging roles but also incredibly different.

    Adult nurses can train to become Health Visitors, and can work in Children's A&E departments, and both paeds and neonatal intensive care units however this is becoming increasingly less common (Rightly so, if you ask me. Why let someone who has only ever nursed adults loose on an intubated premature baby with NEC!?). I work for a large NHS Trust in a Children's Hospital. Hospitals like us probably wouldn't even look at a newly-qualified adult trained nurse. Smaller Trusts that have paeds/neonatal services might consider an adult nurse purely based on the lower application rates for their vacancies. Hospitals like mine will receive thousands of applications per NQ intake, and therefore they have enough qualified children's nurses to choose from.

    Conversion courses of 18 months from adult to children's are still available although limited. That said, the transition would probably be tricky given how different the two fields are.



    You should do the field you most want to do! If you really can't decide there are some 4 year dual field degrees around

    Thanks for the reply.
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    Neither role is "Better". Both are respectable, challenging roles but also incredibly different.

    Adult nurses can train to become Health Visitors, and can work in Children's A&E departments, and both paeds and neonatal intensive care units however this is becoming increasingly less common (Rightly so, if you ask me. Why let someone who has only ever nursed adults loose on an intubated premature baby with NEC!?). I work for a large NHS Trust in a Children's Hospital. Hospitals like us probably wouldn't even look at a newly-qualified adult trained nurse. Smaller Trusts that have paeds/neonatal services might consider an adult nurse purely based on the lower application rates for their vacancies. Hospitals like mine will receive thousands of applications per NQ intake, and therefore they have enough qualified children's nurses to choose from.

    Conversion courses of 18 months from adult to children's are still available although limited. That said, the transition would probably be tricky given how different the two fields are.

    You should do the field you most want to do! If you really can't decide there are some 4 year dual field degrees around

    I'm adult trained and worked on a SCBU. Half the nurses (if not more) on the unit were adult trained, or ex midwives and the care certainly didn't suffer. One of the most amazing things about nursing is the ability to adapt to new situations and areas of care.

    No nurse, child branch or otherwise, is immediately going to be let loose on a poorly preemie. There will always be a period of extra supervision and training, for anyone moving to a new area of work and then a gradual increase on responsibilities. And anyone working with babies that ill will generally have, or be working towards, a postgraduate module/qualification in paediatric intensive care nursing.

    SCBU and NICU are both highly specialised areas of the care. Any one new to them will always need training up. That's why adult nurses can apply too. We may be a little less familiar with the specifics but the general principles still apply. And we can learn the rest.
    It wouldn't be such a established occurrence if there really was such a problem converting adult nurses to NICU nurses.

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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    I'm adult trained and worked on a SCBU. Half the nurses (if not more) on the unit were adult trained, or ex midwives and the care certainly didn't suffer. One of the most amazing things about nursing is the ability to adapt to new situations and areas of care.

    No nurse, child branch or otherwise, is immediately going to be let loose on a poorly preemie. There will always be a period of extra supervision and training, for anyone moving to a new area of work and then a gradual increase on responsibilities. And anyone working with babies that ill will generally have, or be working towards, a postgraduate module/qualification in paediatric intensive care nursing.

    SCBU and NICU are both highly specialised areas of the care. Any one new to them will always need training up. That's why adult nurses can apply too. We may be a little less familiar with the specifics but the general principles still apply. And we can learn the rest.
    It wouldn't be such a established occurrence if there really was such a problem converting adult nurses to NICU nurses.

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    I don't think it was a judgemental post, and I'm sorry if it came across otherwise. I stated from the start how the roles are equal but different.

    So if nurses can adapt to new situations why is it that an adult nurse (Of any experience level) can get a job in NICU, yet a children's nurse cannot go and work in an adult environment?

    A NICU where a friend works hired an NQ adult nurse at the same time as her. What I fail to understand is how this nurse can go her whole 3 year degree learning how to nurse adults, having never seen a sick baby, and then get a NICU job!? Yes there are of course transferrable skills but to my mind that just doesn't make sense. Adult medicine is a completely different world to paeds & neonates. I note that every job I found in my search as a newly qualified, asked for nurses with either RN: Child or RSCN qualifications.
 
 
 
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