LaurenLovesMaths
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
Hi all,
I'm intending to study mathematics at university, and wondered if anyone had any good ideas on how to expand your mathematical knowledge past that of the A-level syllabus?

Thank you!
0
reply
fg45344
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
Study Linear Algebra, Regression Theory (OLS, GLS, anything in econometrics), Optimisation (simplex method, non linear optimisation)
1
reply
fg45344
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 years ago
#3
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...OzNP6KGLSyd4dz

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2Qg...23E7AEFE221F70

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZK3O...DDD91010BC51F8
0
reply
Protoxylic
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
Linear algebra, vector calculus, integral transforms, operator methods

Fourier series and Sturm Liouville theory are pretty interesting topics that are quite general

Set theory tends to be a good one that some read up on during A-Levels

I'm not a mathematician, I'm talking from a scientist's point of view, so I wouldn't know how to expand your knowledge other than to just keep reading
1
reply
Redcoats
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 years ago
#5
Read Disquisitiones Arithmeticae by Carl Friedrich Gauss
1
reply
LaurenLovesMaths
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#6
Thank you so much!
0
reply
B_9710
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#7
Report 3 years ago
#7
I would recommend going through Andrew Wiles' proof of Fermat's last theorem and trying to understand it best you can.
0
reply
LaurenLovesMaths
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#8
(Original post by B_9710)
I would recommend going through Andrew Wiles' proof of Fermat's last theorem and trying to understand it best you can.
Isn't it like the most confusing proof ever though?! Hahaha
0
reply
shawn_o1
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#9
Report 3 years ago
#9
Well, if you know
-the terms "theorem", "lemma", "corollary", "proposition" and "conjecture"
-the different types of proof (direct, induction, contraposition, contradiction etc.)
-the "blackboard bold" symbols used to represent sets of numbers (ℕ ℤ ℚ ℝ ℂ)
You're pretty much ready for degree-level maths

btw if you have a specific career in mind after you leave uni, plan for that well in advance - you might find that you don't need to know Fermat's last theorem in your career
1
reply
LaurenLovesMaths
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#10
(Original post by shawn_o1)
Well, if you know
-the terms "theorem", "lemma", "corollary", "proposition" and "conjecture"
-the different types of proof (direct, induction, contraposition, contradiction etc.)
-the "blackboard bold" symbols used to represent sets of numbers (ℕ ℤ ℚ ℝ ℂ)
You're pretty much ready for degree-level maths

btw if you have a specific career in mind after you leave uni, plan for that well in advance - you might find that you don't need to know Fermat's last theorem in your career
Hahaha thank you!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Hertfordshire
    All Subjects Undergraduate
    Wed, 11 Dec '19
  • University of Lincoln
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 11 Dec '19
  • Bournemouth University
    Undergraduate Mini Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 11 Dec '19

Do you work while at uni?

Yes I work at university (45)
33.33%
No I don't (63)
46.67%
I work during the holidays (27)
20%

Watched Threads

View All