Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Ello,

    Fun fact, I am a very impatient person. So I sit here now, with officially eleven weeks on the clock. Eleven weeks until I start my first module with Open University, towards my degree in Criminology and Psychology.
    I know my first module is DD103 investigating the social world - and I am aware that it is quite a new module.

    But I'm sat here now, and I just want to be doing something. I want to be preparing somehow, working and studying somehow, so I don't feel chucked in at the deep end (which is a risk)
    Do I try and read journals or text books etc, that relate to the issues in my module? Should I just be trying to prepare myself mentally? What do I do?

    I have been chronically ill for five years, and haven't studied a single thing or bee
    n in any education since I left school in 2010. I'm 22 now and I am a blank canvas, but still battling a chronic neurological disorder - hence why I'm at the OU.

    I just don't want to sit here for the next eleven weeks, twiddling my thumbs waiting for it all to start and end up not having a clue or having a mental breakdown!

    So I have come here, for any advice, tips or help.
    Even better if someone who has studied and passed DD103 could comment? I just want to be prepared and ready to study and take knowledge in for the first time in years!
    Any help, advice, response - anything! - will be gladly accepted and appreciated. So many thanks in advance!

    From a nervous little wreck!
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    I haven't studied DD103 but there are plenty of things you can do. There's at least one extract from DD103 on Openworld, if you are registered you may have access to module samples on (SOCSCI? or whatever the faculty is if you have access) read around, look at study skills and stuff.

    Have you skipped DD102? I don't know much about pathways and stuff for these topics. There's a diagnostic quiz for DD103 in case you haven't already seen it.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    There's a couple things I'd advise. The first is to get into the habit of sitting down to study - if you're already used to studying for an hour at 10am every day, adding on another hour or two (or more, depending on modules) isn't going to be as difficult as starting from scratch. During that time, why not try to improve your actual study skills? Academic English is used in essays, and can easily boost your grade if you're making simple mistakes, Reading through some of the resources on OpenLearn or the OU Library might help, or you could try to find resources like essays, books or podcasts online - I know some Unis put up podcasts of lectures, so whilst not necessarily directly relevant to your course, it could still be interesting and helpful in terms of background knowledge or expanding your perspective.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sputum)
    I haven't studied DD103 but there are plenty of things you can do. There's at least one extract from DD103 on Openworld, if you are registered you may have access to module samples on (SOCSCI? or whatever the faculty is if you have access) read around, look at study skills and stuff.

    Have you skipped DD102? I don't know much about pathways and stuff for these topics. There's a diagnostic quiz for DD103 in case you haven't already seen it.
    I have never even heard of OpenWorld? I must be so daft!
    I don't know if I've skipped something, this is just the first module that came up when I enrolled.. probably done something wrong but hey ho. I'm sure I'll be okay! Thanks for replying 😃
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by stripystockings)
    There's a couple things I'd advise. The first is to get into the habit of sitting down to study - if you're already used to studying for an hour at 10am every day, adding on another hour or two (or more, depending on modules) isn't going to be as difficult as starting from scratch. During that time, why not try to improve your actual study skills? Academic English is used in essays, and can easily boost your grade if you're making simple mistakes, Reading through some of the resources on OpenLearn or the OU Library might help, or you could try to find resources like essays, books or podcasts online - I know some Unis put up podcasts of lectures, so whilst not necessarily directly relevant to your course, it could still be interesting and helpful in terms of background knowledge or expanding your perspective.
    This is excellent, helpful advice. Thank you so much. I never thought of brushing up on writing and grammar skills etc, I did have a gander on the OU library yesterday, but just didn't know where to start!
    I am trying to get into the habbit of sitting down everyday with the laptop and just researching things. So now I will actually read from the OU library and brush up on those skills like you said.
    Thank you for your advice! 😃
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Here's what I'm doing before October. It's mostly a combination of using MOOCs to get in the habit of studying, and study guides to make sure I'm doing it right:
    http://sackofcrazy.com/university-st...nd-self-study/
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    I posted this a while ago, but you might find it helpful. During the "introduction" modules, time is devoted to learning study skills as well as learning the module, so you don't need to be amazing before you start. You are eased into writing essays - I did an older version of the course, and the first essay was only 500 words and it gradually built up. You will need to learn referencing, but again this is covered; if you want to try to look at this in advance then you need to use Harvard referencing (there are different referencing styles) but it can be complicated to learn on your own so it might be better to leave it.

    If you haven't studied for a while you may want to consider study skills, but again this is addressed during the course. You may want to consider what time you can devote to study - can you read on the train, do you need childcare, do you have a desk? Think about your circumstances as it will be very personal.
    You will need a computer and Internet access. You've posted here so presumably you have basic knowledge. You might want to play with Word (or other word processing software) to ensure you can change font size, insert a header, double space (also called increase line spacing) and save a file. You'll need to submit files electronically which is very similar to attaching the file to an email - if you can save your practice document and email it to a friend you'll be fine with that. Can you use a search engine and then copy the website url to find again in future? Can you then copy that url into your Word document? Can you log into a website? Can you play audio and video files from the Internet, or play a DVD?

    Can you find several hours of free time? It could be one hour a day, or a block of time on the weekend. The exact amount will depend on the course, so you might only need 5-10 hours for the first few modules and then more time as you progress through your degree.
    You'll need a desk or somewhere to write, and somewhere to keep your books tidy. Some people prefer to make notes on a computer, but others prefer notebook and pen - try both to see what works for you. Get some highlighters and different colour pens.
    A lot of people struggle with notetaking when watching a video or listening to audio. Try watching TV or YouTube and taking notes. Because you're just practising it doesn't matter what it is. You will have audio and video sources at some point during your degree.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by _hmelli)
    This is excellent, helpful advice. Thank you so much. I never thought of brushing up on writing and grammar skills etc, I did have a gander on the OU library yesterday, but just didn't know where to start!
    I am trying to get into the habbit of sitting down everyday with the laptop and just researching things. So now I will actually read from the OU library and brush up on those skills like you said.
    Thank you for your advice! 😃
    The OU website has lots of resources under study skills - and if it's available to you, the Undergraduate Induction might help (mine's on the right of StudentHome, but maybe it depends what course you're doing?)
    Also, you might find this helpful. It's a blog post I wrote on what I'm doing to prepare for OU, essentially.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thank you so much for such a detailed, lengthy response.
    Going from what you and others have said, I think I just need to brush up on my learning skills, read through things and find my studying process and how I research and take notes.
    I prefer pen and paper for note taking, the only thing I really need to sort before it starts is finding a desk to have a computer set up in my own room - going to use my TV as a monitor so I won't be able to distract myself with that.
    Thanks again, looking forward to it!
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by stripystockings)
    There's a couple things I'd advise. The first is to get into the habit of sitting down to study - if you're already used to studying for an hour at 10am every day, adding on another hour or two (or more, depending on modules) isn't going to be as difficult as starting from scratch. During that time, why not try to improve your actual study skills? Academic English is used in essays, and can easily boost your grade if you're making simple mistakes, Reading through some of the resources on OpenLearn or the OU Library might help, or you could try to find resources like essays, books or podcasts online - I know some Unis put up podcasts of lectures, so whilst not necessarily directly relevant to your course, it could still be interesting and helpful in terms of background knowledge or expanding your perspective.
    As someone who's biggest concern is how I motivate myself to do this on top of a FT job, this is amazing advice, thank you!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sarah_Brighton)
    As someone who's biggest concern is how I motivate myself to do this on top of a FT job, this is amazing advice, thank you!
    Glad my thread has helped you too! 😃
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I haven't actually picked a course yet on the OU, I'm going to one of their events to speak to someone face to face first. I am using my time to brush up on learning tools so I am doing Coursera's course on Learning how to Learn.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    There is a facebook page for selling and swapping OU course materials, if you haven't seen it already I would check out if anyone has any books relating to your course.

    I'm also impatient and as I'm about to be going into 120 credits in my first year, alongside full time work and various commitments, I wanted to get ahead on any reading I could before it all begins.

    Also, keep an eye out for your module groups starting to pop up on facebook for this year, although the OU provides forums, I found the facebook groups a lot easier to interact with and as long as OU rules are adhered to, you can use both and maybe make a few friends along the way that you could be meeting at tutorials and social events etc
 
 
 
Poll
Do you think parents should charge rent?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.