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    Hello everyone!

    I've applied to study economics, but I've realised it's not something for me. I am half English, although Iwas born and brought up in Italy, and the English language is my passion. However, I've never studied English literature at school, and, although I feel my English is quite good, I still make some mistakes. In light of this, do you think I could try applying to study English lit next year with
    my current qualifications only (which include Italian lit) or would I have to do an A-level in English first? Finally, how hard is English lit at university level?

    Thsnks
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    Go for it it! If English language is your passion, why don't you apply for an English language degree?
    Your Italian lit qualification should be absolutely fine as the techniques you learn are more or less the same and everybody makes mistakes, even native speakers.
    I studied English for 4 years (one year of literature) before I went to England and took an AS-Level in English Literature and it wasn't harder than my course at home.
    I've been studying English for 7 years now and I'm starting an English lit degree in September and I'm pretty sure I'll be fine.

    If you're willing to put some effort into it, you're probably not gonna struggle that much at uni. You might try and look at some modules online and the books they include and maybe read one or two so you get an idea of what it's gonna be like.
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    (Original post by Nonoto)
    Hello everyone!

    I've applied to study economics, but I've realised it's not something for me. I am half English, although Iwas born and brought up in Italy, and the English language is my passion. However, I've never studied English literature at school, and, although I feel my English is quite good, I still make some mistakes. In light of this, do you think I could try applying to study English lit next year with
    my current qualifications only (which include Italian lit) or would I have to do an A-level in English first? Finally, how hard is English lit at university level?

    Thsnks
    In order to study English Language and/or Linguistics at degree level, you would need an A-level in either of the following; English Literature, English Language, or the combined English Language & Literature A-levels.

    Italian Lit is not the same as English Lit. Now, grant you, you probably have gained some of the same skills, but because Italian has different syntax and grammatical elements to that of the English Language, it will be harder.

    You will most likely have to do English Lit or English Language A-level. It's like you saying you have an A-level or qualification in Italian and wanting to study English Language at uni. Even though you have studied Italian Language, it's not the same as English Language. The same if you wish to study Spanish or French.

    English Lit is very subjective. I find it difficult at times, especially applying theory to literature. But it's all about analysis and your skill. Each year, my uni focuses on something different. For example, first year focuses on analysis and skill, whilst 2nd year is all about in depth analysis and contextual theory. All uni's are different.
    I think it's as hard as you make it. Some of the texts you will study will be difficult either because it's just not your preferred literature or because it's just hard to understand whether conceptual or theoretical.

    Your first step will be taking A-level in English Lit or English Lang & Lit (the combined course.

    But of course, I do not speak as a whole of the UK universities and Higher Institutions. You should contact the ones that you would like to apply to, and email the admissions team.
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    In order to study English Language and/or Linguistics at degree level, you would need an A-level in either of the following; English Literature, English Language, or the combined English Language & Literature A-levels.

    Italian Lit is not the same as English Lit. Now, grant you, you probably have gained some of the same skills, but because Italian has different syntax and grammatical elements to that of the English Language, it will be harder.

    You will most likely have to do English Lit or English Language A-level. It's like you saying you have an A-level or qualification in Italian and wanting to study English Language at uni. Even though you have studied Italian Language, it's not the same as English Language. The same if you wish to study Spanish or French.

    English Lit is very subjective. I find it difficult at times, especially applying theory to literature. But it's all about analysis and your skill. Each year, my uni focuses on something different. For example, first year focuses on analysis and skill, whilst 2nd year is all about in depth analysis and contextual theory. All uni's are different.
    I think it's as hard as you make it. Some of the texts you will study will be difficult either because it's just not your preferred literature or because it's just hard to understand whether conceptual or theoretical.

    Your first step will be taking A-level in English Lit or English Lang & Lit (the combined course.

    But of course, I do not speak as a whole of the UK universities and Higher Institutions. You should contact the ones that you would like to apply to, and email the admissions team.
    You don't need to complete an A-Level in English Language/Literature though, we don't do English language here at all and my friend still got offers for an English lang degree. I haven't got an A-Level in English lit and I got offers too.
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    (Original post by Adelemyqueen)
    You don't need to complete an A-Level in English Language/Literature though, we don't do English language here at all and my friend still got offers for an English lang degree. I haven't got an A-Level in English lit and I got offers too.
    **But of course, I do not speak as a whole of the UK universities and Higher Institutions. You should contact the ones that you would like to apply to, and email the admissions team.

    **Read before commenting.
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    **But of course, I do not speak as a whole of the UK universities and Higher Institutions. You should contact the ones that you would like to apply to, and email the admissions team.

    **Read before commenting.
    No point in saying that you need to take an A-Level in Lang/Lit then.
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    (Original post by Adelemyqueen)
    No point in saying that you need to take an A-Level in Lang/Lit then.
    I am not speaking for all universities, but some universities, like the one I attend would not allow a student who has not taken A-level English Language or Lit at A-level to study English at degree. Many out of the 130 UK universities are like this.
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    Hey,


    I'm probably a bit too late, but...

    First of all, we seem to have a lot in common as I'm in exactly the same situation as you, except I'm from Hungary.

    Although your Italian literature qualification wouldn't compensate for not having English literature as one of your subjects, it'd certainly help your application, since it'd show admissions tutors that you've studied literature in more than one language. (I've actually mentioned this in my personal statement!) If you're really half English, you should be fine (I'm multilingual too - I'm equally fluent in English, German and Hungarian and I've wanted to study English literature since I was 7! I still can't believe I'm not the only one!
    Technically,, most of the 'good' unis would indeed require you to take a level 3 qualification (they don't care if it's an A-level, an IB or the Italian matura (or whatever it's called) - all they care about is that English literature (or English language and literature) should be among your subjects. However, they do recognise how hard it is for some overseas applicants to take a qualification in English literature (To quote an admissions tutor AT UCL, THEY ARE "
    aware that applicants from other countries might have difficulty in accessing appropriate examinations in order to meet the subject requirements for this programme.".
    If there's a CIE/Edexcel A-level centre (such as an international school) near you that is willing to take private candidates then I strongly recommend taking the exam. Alternatively, you could ask your local British Council if they're willing to help. If taking an exam is absolutely impossible for you, which I completely understand because I had the same issue, just explain your situation to your uni choices - they'll understand, trust me! Although some unis may will wave this subject requirement for you, they will still expect you to have studied English literature at least in your own time - after all, that's what you're going to be studying for at least 3 years! Needless to say, they'll expect you to have read a lot of literature in English.
    You could either
    - find a tutor and an exam centre and take a qualification in english literature
    or
    - spend a year at a university in Italy studying English and American studies (I'm doing a combination of these two. Yes, those literature modules might be GCSE level because they're designed for foreign students with a low level of English who know little to nothing about English literature, but at least you could mention some of the works you'd be studying in your personal statement. Trust me, this could make up for not meeting the exact subject requirements! I'm speaking from experience - I got an unconditional offer from Durham when I last applied [I couldn't start this year so I'm re-applying to 4 unis], and even some Cambridge colleges are willing to consider applications for English from students with such unusual situations!

    Alternatively, assuming you aren't taking an undergraduate course at the moment, you could apply for a so-called "foundation year". For example, you could apply for Durham's English with foundation course, which is basically the standard English degree course with a foundation year. I'm mentioning Durham because that's the uni I looked at when I was considering taking a foundation year, but a lot of other good unis do foundation years!

    I hope this helps a bit!
 
 
 
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