I visited the calais jungle with an interpreter. Ask me anything.

Watch
string210
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
I went down with a charity that gives out food, toiletries etc.
I in all spent about a day there and was accompanied by an interpreter so i asked the locals pretty much every question I could even think of. So yh, people always ask about it, so whatever u want to know. Ask away!
0
reply
Duncan2012
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
(Original post by string210)
I went down with a charity that gives out food, toiletries etc.
I in all spent about a day there and was accompanied by an interpreter so i asked the locals pretty much every question I could even think of. So yh, people always ask about it, so whatever u want to know. Ask away!
Did you really speak to any of 'the locals'? Did you speak to any of the lorry drivers? How had the migrants' attitudes changed since the Brexit result?
0
reply
string210
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by Duncan2012)
Did you really speak to any of 'the locals'? Did you speak to any of the lorry drivers? How had the migrants' attitudes changed since the Brexit result?
1. when i said locals i meant the people in the jungle, sorry not the french locals of calais. 2.No, i did not get to speak to the lorry drivers either.3. No one knew anything about the brexit vote or what it even means. And when i talked to them about teresa may they didn't have a clue who she was either.
0
reply
gladders
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
Could you give a bit more detail about how/why you went there, what charity and so on? What did the camp look like?
0
reply
Duncan2012
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 years ago
#5
(Original post by string210)
1. when i said locals i meant the people in the jungle, sorry not the french locals of calais. 2.No, i did not get to speak to the lorry drivers either.3. No one knew anything about the brexit vote or what it even means. And when i talked to them about teresa may they didn't have a clue who she was either.
Which charity did you go with? What was the biggest thing you leant from your trip? Have you changed any of your opinions as a result of your visit?
0
reply
Manitude
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
Where did these people predominantly come from?
How did they get to Europe? What was that like?
Did you ask why they were attempting to access the UK rather than any other safe country in Europe?
In your opinion was their reason for doing this valid/reasonable?
0
reply
string210
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#7
(Original post by Duncan2012)
Which charity did you go with? What was the biggest thing you leant from your trip? Have you changed any of your opinions as a result of your visit?
1.care4calais
2. A refugee can include someone fleeing natural disasters. e.g a draught. Which means a large majority of Africa would be deemed refugees if they left their country of origin as droughts occur frequently. I always assumed many were fleeing war, but the are not. Many are just trying to leaving to improve their standard of living, as trying to grow agriculture in North Africa where water is scarce is difficult. And almost everyone i spoke to was in the same boat(if u excuse the pun).
3. The standard of living is considerable better in calais than i had previously thought. They live in very large houses made of the same material as tents, they have all their meals provided by charities, and the french give then water and power. Most have bikes and their are charging stations to charge phones. In fact many ask me to help them catch pokemon, using the new pokemon go app, using phones significantly better than my own. I do feel for people trying to take treacherous journeys to flee droughts, but their situation in calais is far from awful, in fact probably considerably better than most of Africa and many parts of the middle east.
1
reply
string210
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#8
(Original post by Manitude)
Where did these people predominantly come from?
How did they get to Europe? What was that like?
Did you ask why they were attempting to access the UK rather than any other safe country in Europe?
In your opinion was their reason for doing this valid/reasonable?
1.Most travel from North Africa to sicily where they then pass through Italy, this is why most of the residents called me bambino, which is italian for child. Just a word they picked up. They talked about being very scared during the trip across water, and how they all quickly realised it wasnt drinkable.
2. They wanted to go to the UK, because they said as when they saw images on television, on their phones. The UK seemed like the place to be, they had heard stories about all the money and how everyone was happy. Then when they got to calais, the idea of people allowing them to pass through europe but couldn't get to the UK, made them think. That this place must be amazing if it is protected. Furthermore all the french people they saw were police that would round them and up and sometimes use tear gas. Whenever they saw an english person, they were from a charity, and would bring great gifts they described. A combination of all these things make England seem like heaven.
3. I'll leave that up to you
0
reply
Manitude
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 years ago
#9
(Original post by string210)
1.Most travel from North Africa to sicily where they then pass through Italy, this is why most of the residents called me bambino, which is italian for child. Just a word they picked up. They talked about being very scared during the trip across water, and how they all quickly realised it wasnt drinkable.
2. They wanted to go to the UK, because they said as when they saw images on television, on their phones. The UK seemed like the place to be, they had heard stories about all the money and how everyone was happy. Then when they got to calais, the idea of people allowing them to pass through europe but couldn't get to the UK, made them think. That this place must be amazing if it is protected. Furthermore all the french people they saw were police that would round them and up and sometimes use tear gas. Whenever they saw an english person, they were from a charity, and would bring great gifts they described. A combination of all these things make England seem like heaven.
3. I'll leave that up to you
Thanks for the response. They're an interesting set of reasons for coming to the UK and I hadn't really considered these things. I assumed it was primarily what you first said, about money, but the other points are reasonable from their perspective. But from the perspective of a European, it seems as though the rest of Europe doesn't have a very good image. Maybe other European countries should be offering to take people in, rather than leaving it to the UK to sort out. The migrant crisis over the last year is not a crisis is everybody is spread around equally. In my town we have 22 Syrian refugees. Not exactly a crisis in a town of over 50,000! I think the Catholic church said that the "crisis" would be entirely managed if each parish took in one family. That's probably the only time I'll agree with the position of the Catholic church.
0
reply
string210
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#10
(Original post by gladders)
Could you give a bit more detail about how/why you went there, what charity and so on? What did the camp look like?
This is what it looked like from outside:
http://s.newsweek.com/sites/www.news...migrants_0.jpg

But on the inside, a different story is told. Many places looked more like this:
http://america.aljazeera.com/content...6266261032.jpg
1
reply
string210
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#11
(Original post by Manitude)
Thanks for the response. They're an interesting set of reasons for coming to the UK and I hadn't really considered these things. I assumed it was primarily what you first said, about money, but the other points are reasonable from their perspective. But from the perspective of a European, it seems as though the rest of Europe doesn't have a very good image. Maybe other European countries should be offering to take people in, rather than leaving it to the UK to sort out. The migrant crisis over the last year is not a crisis is everybody is spread around equally. In my town we have 22 Syrian refugees. Not exactly a crisis in a town of over 50,000! I think the Catholic church said that the "crisis" would be entirely managed if each parish took in one family. That's probably the only time I'll agree with the position of the Catholic church.
Yh i think accepting refugees is a reasonable position which i understand. The only confusion comes when people forget refugee includes those fleeing natural disasters, such as droughts. Which makes most of Africa potential refugees. Is it a viable scenario for 1.2 billion people to move to Europe. If people are allowed to move, will it just encourage more movement. The fact that many are stopped at calais has left many thinking they will just claim asylum in germany, france and some are even applying for asylum in canada. I want to be a very welcoming and kind person, but a solution to this problem can be very difficult!
Do we say we only accept refugees from conflict and persecution. I don't know. Lots to think about!
0
reply
Manitude
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 years ago
#12
(Original post by string210)
Yh i think accepting refugees is a reasonable position which i understand. The only confusion comes when people forget refugee includes those fleeing natural disasters, such as droughts. Which makes most of Africa potential refugees. Is it a viable scenario for 1.2 billion people to move to Europe. If people are allowed to move, will it just encourage more movement. The fact that many are stopped at calais has left many thinking they will just claim asylum in germany, france and some are even applying for asylum in canada. I want to be a very welcoming and kind person, but a solution to this problem can be very difficult!
Do we say we only accept refugees from conflict and persecution. I don't know. Lots to think about!
There is certainly a limit to the number of people who can come here, but the thing that a lot of people forget is that fleeing natural disasters or conflict is temporary. Draught is not permanent. War is not permanent. Once the threat is not an issue then there is no reason for asylum seekers to be in their temporary place of residence so the reasonable thing to do is for governments to pay for them to return to their homes (and potentially help them rebuild their homes if they have been destroyed). That policy becomes infinitely more challenging when asylum seekers start having children, as many countries will accept babies born in their country to be citizens. Forcing children to resettle in a new country is not something I'd want to do.

It's not an easy situation at all, and every policy will have flaws. We have some kind of duty to help people when we can, but we cannot give everything to everyone who asks for it forever. Some middle ground has to be found.
0
reply
AlphaSlayer
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#13
Report 4 years ago
#13
Were you culturally enriched
6
reply
string210
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#14
(Original post by Manitude)
There is certainly a limit to the number of people who can come here, but the thing that a lot of people forget is that fleeing natural disasters or conflict is temporary. Draught is not permanent. War is not permanent. Once the threat is not an issue then there is no reason for asylum seekers to be in their temporary place of residence so the reasonable thing to do is for governments to pay for them to return to their homes (and potentially help them rebuild their homes if they have been destroyed). That policy becomes infinitely more challenging when asylum seekers start having children, as many countries will accept babies born in their country to be citizens. Forcing children to resettle in a new country is not something I'd want to do.

It's not an easy situation at all, and every policy will have flaws. We have some kind of duty to help people when we can, but we cannot give everything to everyone who asks for it forever. Some middle ground has to be found.
Even temporarily 1.2 billion is still alot of people which cannot feasible be managed for droughts, but for conflict i can definetely see it working!
0
reply
string210
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#15
(Original post by AlphaSlayer)
Were you culturally enriched
No, but I am enriched with perspective and knowledge!
0
reply
fefssdf
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#16
Report 4 years ago
#16
this is a great thread and I'm pleased to know that the people there and being treated well with food and water, and its good that pokemon go is keeping them occupied !
0
reply
Gora The Xplorer
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#17
Report 4 years ago
#17
Did you catch any pokemon?
2
reply
Duncan2012
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#18
Report 4 years ago
#18
They obviously escaped the droughts and other natural disasters you alluded to once they reached Europe - how can they justify illegally trying to get into the UK rather than claiming asylum when they first had the opportunity?

If charities stopped providing free accommodation, food, clothing, electricity etc would the people move elsewhere?

If they're wealthy enough to afford hi-tech smartphones they're obviously not destitute - why should the public provide assistance to those who can provide for themselves but choose not to?
0
reply
ByEeek
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#19
Report 4 years ago
#19
(Original post by Manitude)
Once the threat is not an issue then there is no reason for asylum seekers to be in their temporary place of residence so the reasonable thing to do is for governments to pay for them to return to their homes (and potentially help them rebuild their homes if they have been destroyed
That is the black and white answer that doesn't take into account reality. Sure, it is reasonable someone should go back and rebuild their lives but how? Imagine your town or village was completely flattened in a war and I sent you back there to rebuild your life. Where would you start? How would you rebuild your house? I take it you aren't a builder? And even if you could find materials and labour to build it, where would you live whilst it was being built? And what would you eat and drink whilst it was being rebuilt? And of course, regardless of any of this, it takes no account of the fact that you may have settled down, had kids and become a part of a community whilst you were away.
0
reply
banterboy
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#20
Report 4 years ago
#20
did u get raped
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (77)
14%
I'm not sure (24)
4.36%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (177)
32.18%
I have already dropped out (11)
2%
I'm not a current university student (261)
47.45%

Watched Threads

View All