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    Test yourself to see if your British enough.
    Many migrants have to be test before citizenship with citizenpaper
    google it citizenpaper
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    (Original post by Grace019)
    Test yourself to see if your British enough.
    Many migrants have to be test before citizenship with citizenpaper
    google it citizenpaper
    Lazy. as. fuuuuuuuuck.
    Anyway after I find it myself I'll do it

    *wtf there's like 100 of these?! :rofl:
    now I see why they sneak in the country
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    1. Question What is the fundamental principle of British life?
    • Attending a Church on Sundays
    • Supporting your local team
    • The rule of law
    • Taking part in festivals


    :hmmmm:
    Is it...option B? :rofl:
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    (Original post by 0to100)
    1. Question What is the fundamental principle of British life?
    • Attending a Church on Sundays
    • Supporting your local team
    • The rule of law
    • Taking part in festivals


    :hmmmm:
    Is it...option B? :rofl:
    Duh. No, it's obviously D. That means suddenly becoming proudly British whenever it enables a bank holiday e.g. Royal weddings.
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    (Original post by Platopus)
    Duh. No, it's obviously D. That means suddenly becoming proudly British whenever it enables a bank holiday e.g. Royal weddings.
    Booooo. It's so B bruv!
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    Its called http://citizenpaper.co.uk/ check it out
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    I'm from the US, but I am curious how well I would do on one of these...

    Didn't do very well. I only scored 58.33%, and I got the same score on two different tests afterwards, so presumably it represents my current level of knowledge accurately. The main ones that trip me up are the ones that expect me to know extremely specific dates down to the year, or the number of people serving on a specific body. I might have done better on this had I taken a European History class or something recently.

    Here were my responses to each question on the last one:

    Spoiler:
    Show

    1. What was the name of plague that killed one third of the population of England in 1348?

    The Black Death. I got this one right because it's the most famous plague in the history of Europe, and children still sing nursery rhymes related to it.

    2. Which of these names was Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn’s child’s name?

    Elizabeth. Everyone knows the sad tale of Anne Boleyn and Henry's anger towards her for her failure to produce a son. With a little thought, it's easy to recall that Queen Elizabeth I was their daughter. The child resulting from that marriage got an entire era named after her, the Elizabethan Era.

    Where was Isaac Newton born?

    England. If he were Scottish, the history books would have mentioned that as they did for Adam Smith, and it would have stood out in my mind. Besides, Newton sounds like an English last name, and Cambridge is definitely an English university.

    When did the American colonies declare independence?

    1776. I'm American, so of course I know that. But why is this on a British test for citizenship? I guess it was significant for Britain too, but still.

    Where can you visit Admiral Nelson’s ship , HMS Victory?

    Portsmouth. Actually, a lucky guess. Portsmouth sounds like a port town, and I happened to know the other three towns it mentioned were landlocked.

    Which house won the War of the Roses?

    I wasn't familiar with this war. I knew that the House of Commons gained power later, but I didn't know there was a battle between two noble houses for the crown. Apparently it was the House of Lancaster.

    The King James’ Bible is a new translation of the bible into English

    True. I answered that it was a new translation because William Tyndale authored the first English translation. You could call it old compared to the NIV, but new compared to Tyndale. I assumed correctly that they were implicitly testing to see if I knew the King James Version wasn't the first English translation of the Bible.

    Who had the title ‘Lord Protector’?

    Oliver Cromwell. I know this era of history fairly well, and I've heard that nickname ascribed to him before.

    When did the Industrial Revolution take place?

    I falsely answered 19th and 20th rather than 18th and 19th. I knew it was definitely taking place in the 19th century, I just wasn't sure whether the 18th was included or not. 18th century sounded too far back.

    Which TWO are located in Scotland?

    They made it really easy. I knew Edinburgh Castle was in Scotland, and the term Loch in Loch Lomond sounds Gaelic enough that it has to be Scottish or Irish.

    When were films first shown publicly in the UK?

    I guessed 1901, but it was 1896. There was nothing to go on... all the years given were in the late 19th or early 20th century within a decade of the appropriate time period. You pretty much would have to have memorized that fact to get it right.

    What time do Public Houses open at?

    I don't drink, but I assumed it wouldn't be a time early in the morning because no one with a job would show up until lunchtime, even if they work part-time. So I guessed noon... and I was an hour off, because they apparently open at eleven.

    How many volunteers is The National Trust run by?

    Completely ignorant on this one. I had no idea it was run by 61,000 volunteers, because I had no idea what the National Trust was in the first place. I guessed 4,500 because the correct amount sounded really high.

    Where are the most serious criminal cases in Scotland heard at?

    I guessed High Court correctly. Mostly because every state in the US has either a Supreme Court or a High Court as the highest non-Federal court, and the first thought that came to mind was that if Supreme Court isn't on the list, High Court is the best answer. I knew Crown Court wasn't the highest court in the land, and Court of Session and Sheriff Court sound like civil or minor courts to my ear although I don't know their function.

    Civil servants are expected to be politically neutral, what core values should they have?

    Impartiality. Not only is it just another way of saying politically neutral, but the other answers are silly or undesirable qualities for a civil servant to have. Misleading, corruption, and sense of humor. They practically gave me that one.

    How often are Elections for the European parliament held?

    I had no idea, but I assumed it wasn't very often. I guessed 6 years, turned out it was 5 years.

    Which TWO changes did the Chartists campaign for?

    I don't know who the Chartists were, but I guessed secret ballots and for every woman to have the vote. Turned out it was secret ballots and elections every year.

    The UK has a constitutional monarchy

    True. This should be pretty obvious to anyone with even a cursory knowledge of the UK.

    Who chairs the debates in the House of Commons?

    I knew it wasn't the Shadow Minister or the Judge, so it had to be either the Prime Minister or the Speaker. I ended up guessing Prime Minister because I wasn't sure if there was a Speaker in the House of Commons or what their role was, but knowing that there is one makes it a lot clearer that that was the correct answer.

    For which TWO subjects are Secretaries of State responsible?

    I had no idea because a Secretary of State in the US is concerned with foreign policy, and none of the answers really made sense to me.

    The Scottish Parliament was formed in 1998 and sits in Edinburgh

    False. The Scottish Parliament does sit in Edinburgh, but apparently it was formed in 1999, rather than 1998. This just seems like another fact you'd have to memorize in order to answer correctly.

    Which of these is NOT part of the Commonwealth?

    USA. I know that the main reason we haven't joined is because we'd have to show some kind of respect to the British Monarch that our constitution doesn't allow. Also, we'd probably economically and politically overshadow the UK within the organization, which isn't something they'd enjoy. I also knew that the UK, Barbados, and Canada were definitely members.

    NATO aims to maintain peace between all of its members

    True. I was thinking to myself that the main aim was to help members if they came under attack, but presumably peace between all members would be conducive to the goal of any international body like NATO. The USA is a part of this one.
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