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Considering dropping out MSc. How will it affect my career? Watch

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    I've been struggling with my MSc in political science since the start of the programme. The programme isn't what I expected. And I did a undergraduate degree in finance and already hold an offer from a top financial services firm. I now have two months to finish my dissertation and I want to quit.I hated my programme with a passion. and I had 0 political knowledge before I applied so I've been struggling since day 1. I've already failed three modules which I'll have to resit after November. I failed because I didn't understand the content. These two modules were about advanced quantitative research and EU politics. And I jumped in with no foundamental knowledge whatsoever. Moreover, with work and professional exams which I will have to study for, I won't have time to study for the resits.I also hate my dissertation topic. I addressed this issue with my two supervisors but they didn't seem to think it was a concern. Again I came up with the topic with very little background knowledge and without knowing it's actually not something I'd like to do.I've been trying to re concentrate on my dissertation for a week with no success. The more I read for my dissertation, the more I dislike it.I've already contacted my firm and my school to discuss any potential consequences of dropping out and I'm still waiting for a response. I don't want to quit but I struggle to continue. It's affected my life severely and I have pre existing depression for years which my school knows about. I couldn't have dropped out earlier as I'm on a tier 4 visa which is required by my firm to apply for a tier 2 work visa. Now my tier 2 work visa application has been submitted.
    Please give me advice
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    (Original post by Samantha303)
    I've been struggling with my MSc in political science since the start of the programme. The programme isn't what I expected. And I did a undergraduate degree in finance and already hold an offer from a top financial services firm. I now have two months to finish my dissertation and I want to quit.I hated my programme with a passion. and I had 0 political knowledge before I applied so I've been struggling since day 1. I've already failed three modules which I'll have to resit after November. I failed because I didn't understand the content. These two modules were about advanced quantitative research and EU politics. And I jumped in with no foundamental knowledge whatsoever. Moreover, with work and professional exams which I will have to study for, I won't have time to study for the resits.I also hate my dissertation topic. I addressed this issue with my two supervisors but they didn't seem to think it was a concern. Again I came up with the topic with very little background knowledge and without knowing it's actually not something I'd like to do.I've been trying to re concentrate on my dissertation for a week with no success. The more I read for my dissertation, the more I dislike it.I've already contacted my firm and my school to discuss any potential consequences of dropping out and I'm still waiting for a response. I don't want to quit but I struggle to continue. It's affected my life severely and I have pre existing depression for years which my school knows about. I couldn't have dropped out earlier as I'm on a tier 4 visa which is required by my firm to apply for a tier 2 work visa. Now my tier 2 work visa application has been submitted.
    Please give me advice
    I don't think it will have any matter over your career. It will have an effect on your bank account as you'll have to repay all your Masters in an undisclosed way if you don't complete the course.

    Why did you go blind-sighted into a Masters if you had no previous or relevant knowledge of the subject? To me, that was your mistake.

    I do not know how post-grad works, but can you not apply for an extension or mitigating circumstances?

    If you feel like your whole programme is worth nothing then I don't see the point in graduating with a bad classification or whatever they call it which I think is pass, merit or distinction?

    If your job that you have yourself lined up for solely relies on the MSc, then of course it will affect that particular job, but without the MSc, you'll just be like any normal grad, with an undergraduate degree really.

    I think you really need to have sit down with your tutors and really discuss any potential consequences of you dropping out.
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    I don't think it will have any matter over your career. It will have an effect on your bank account as you'll have to repay all your Masters in an undisclosed way if you don't complete the course.

    Why did you go blind-sighted into a Masters if you had no previous or relevant knowledge of the subject? To me, that was your mistake.

    I do not know how post-grad works, but can you not apply for an extension or mitigating circumstances?

    If you feel like your whole programme is worth nothing then I don't see the point in graduating with a bad classification or whatever they call it which I think is pass, merit or distinction?

    If your job that you have yourself lined up for solely relies on the MSc, then of course it will affect that particular job, but without the MSc, you'll just be like any normal grad, with an undergraduate degree really.

    I think you really need to have sit down with your tutors and really discuss any potential consequences of you dropping out.
    It's already been paid for fully.
    When I applied, there was no prior political knowledge needed so I thought it wouldn't be that difficult.
    Due to pre-existing health issues, I have already applied for mitigating circumstances. Spent a solid three weeks on one of the 3000 word essays and still failed. This programme is really out of my league.

    I have talked to my employer and they said nothing would be affected if i droppped out.
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    (Original post by Samantha303)
    It's already been paid for fully.
    When I applied, there was no prior political knowledge needed so I thought it wouldn't be that difficult.
    Due to pre-existing health issues, I have already applied for mitigating circumstances. Spent a solid three weeks on one of the 3000 word essays and still failed. This programme is really out of my league.

    I have talked to my employer and they said nothing would be affected if i droppped out.
    It really is bs when a post-grad course says that. Of course you'd need some form of knowledge; whether it's academic or personal knowledge of the subject. You can't go into a post-grad not knowing a single thing about something, unless you have a mind that just loves learning, literally, new things.

    Well if they replied saying if you do not gain this post-grad qualification and your position within the company is still as firm as it ever was, then drop out.

    However, you must consider - this firm doesn't care about the MSc, but how about other places? Do not just focus on the one you have got now. Most post-grad qualifications doesn't make you more prone to get a job to that of a person without that masters.

    If you are willing to drop out because it's affecting your health and well-being, then I say drop out. On the other hand, 2 months isn't much. Maybe you can get some friends of yours to help you out? Do you know anyone from uni that did similar under grad degrees like Politics or Economics or Philosophy even?

    Unfortunately hon, that's all the advice I can give you. The rest is up to you to decide what it better for you.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    It really is bs when a post-grad course says that. Of course you'd need some form of knowledge; whether it's academic or personal knowledge of the subject. You can't go into a post-grad not knowing a single thing about something, unless you have a mind that just loves learning, literally, new things.

    Well if they replied saying if you do not gain this post-grad qualification and your position within the company is still as firm as it ever was, then drop out.

    However, you must consider - this firm doesn't care about the MSc, but how about other places? Do not just focus on the one you have got now. Most post-grad qualifications doesn't make you more prone to get a job to that of a person without that masters.

    If you are willing to drop out because it's affecting your health and well-being, then I say drop out. On the other hand, 2 months isn't much. Maybe you can get some friends of yours to help you out? Do you know anyone from uni that did similar under grad degrees like Politics or Economics or Philosophy even?

    Unfortunately hon, that's all the advice I can give you. The rest is up to you to decide what it better for you.

    Good luck!
    Thank you very much for your help.
    Technically I have two months to go but with three failed modules, I will actually have to study part time if I choose not to drop out.
    My main concern is if i did drop out, there would be a gap on my cv. My tutor suggests that I could say I dropped out of a msc programme due to illness without giving any further detail about my past medical history. I am really concerned that future recruiters would hold it against me.
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    As the poster above stated, why did you not properly research the degree before you studied it. If you back out now and from my understanding you took out a bank loan to pay for the Masters, you'll be immediately liable to begin servicing that debt at market rates.
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    (Original post by marco14196)
    As the poster above stated, why did you not properly research the degree before you studied it. If you back out now and from my understanding you took out a bank loan to pay for the Masters, you'll be immediately liable to begin servicing that debt at market rates.
    There is no loan. Everything has been paid in full including accommodation.
    I did do my research but the whole experience was very different from what I had known on paper.
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    (Original post by Samantha303)
    My main concern is if i did drop out, there would be a gap on my cv. My tutor suggests that I could say I dropped out of a msc programme due to illness without giving any further detail about my past medical history. I am really concerned that future recruiters would hold it against me.
    An employer would wonder why you weren't given an opportunity to retake the course/modules if you were ill, and why you didn't take that opportunity up.

    They may also ask you to disclose what the medical circumstances are or to provide medical/academic records to support it.

    They may also ask you to complete a medical background check as part of the on-boarding process if you did get the job.

    Some employers might not bother with any of the above and you might be fortunate enough that it never gets raised as an issue. But there is a significant chance that at different stages, stating you were ill as a reason for dropping out of your course could be questioned or picked up.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    An employer would wonder why you weren't given an opportunity to retake the course/modules if you were ill, and why you didn't take that opportunity up.

    They may also ask you to disclose what the medical circumstances are or to provide medical/academic records to support it.

    They may also ask you to complete a medical background check as part of the on-boarding process if you did get the job.

    Some employers might not bother with any of the above and you might be fortunate enough that it never gets raised as an issue. But there is a significant chance that at different stages, stating you were ill as a reason for dropping out of your course could be questioned or picked up.

    Yeah I don't think I would disclose that I have had medical issues. If I did drop out, I would most likely explain how it was not suitable for me. regardless, I am worried how it would affect my career.
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    (Original post by Samantha303)
    Yeah I don't think I would disclose that I have had medical issues. If I did drop out, I would most likely explain how it was not suitable for me. regardless, I am worried how it would affect my career.
    I guess it depends on how relevant the subject is to the career. If the academic knowledge is very transferable to the career, then you might struggle.

    Some might also question your ability to stick to things/resilience, particularly when you got so far into your course before giving up.

    Its more difficult on an application form, but at interview if you can explain your reasons well and show clear rationale/judgement then its not necessarily a bad thing. I have interviewed people who dropped out of courses and explained why they did so with very clear logic.

    But you already have a job lined up, so unless their expectation and requirement is that you have the masters, I don't think it will be an issue. You will start your job in September and build your experience up from there. Any future jobs you have will be far more interested in your experience than your qualifications.
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    I guess it depends on how relevant the subject is to the career. If the academic knowledge is very transferable to the career, then you might struggle.

    Some might also question your ability to stick to things/resilience, particularly when you got so far into your course before giving up.

    Its more difficult on an application form, but at interview if you can explain your reasons well and show clear rationale/judgement then its not necessarily a bad thing. I have interviewed people who dropped out of courses and explained why they did so with very clear logic.

    But you already have a job lined up, so unless their expectation and requirement is that you have the masters, I don't think it will be an issue. You will start your job in September and build your experience up from there. Any future jobs you have will be far more interested in your experience than your qualifications.
    This is what I worry about the most.
    However, I thought about dropping out before April and have asked for an earlier start on my job. My company declined as there would not be enough time to apply for a work visa for me. As a result, I couldn't have dropped out earlier.

    Would I instantly become an unworthy candidate on paper if I dropped out?
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    (Original post by Samantha303)
    This is what I worry about the most.
    However, I thought about dropping out before April and have asked for an earlier start on my job. My company declined as there would not be enough time to apply for a work visa for me. As a result, I couldn't have dropped out earlier.

    Would I instantly become an unworthy candidate on paper if I dropped out?
    As long as your future employer that you already have a job offer with is ok with it, I really wouldn't worry.The only issue would be if you then failed your professional exams or decided to leave your future job fairly soon after joining, as then there would be two instances in a row of not passing something or leaving something. The combination of both of those things would be far more difficult to explain.
 
 
 
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