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Minimal books nessecary to read during a university Medicine course Watch

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    OK everyone,Future doctors who are in the last year of their medical course, please list down the books you HAVE TO read throughout your whole course (pre-clinical and clinical) as advised in YOUR university (telling which one you are in) .

    Starting from Biology, Anatomy, etc in the first years till the last year, Surgery Obstetrics, and what so ever. As many as you remember

    Does variety make any SIGNIFICANT difference in education outcome of different medical schools?
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    why do you want to do the bare minimum? Surely you aspire to be a great doctor and be the best in your field?
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    (Original post by Ibrahim.alghoul)
    OK everyone,Future doctors who are in the last year of their medical course, please list down the books you HAVE TO read throughout your whole course (pre-clinical and clinical) as advised in YOUR university (telling which one you are in) .

    Starting from Biology, Anatomy, etc in the first years till the last year, Surgery Obstetrics, and what so ever. As many as you remember

    Does variety make any SIGNIFICANT difference in education outcome of different medical schools?
    There are no books which you "have" to read. There are subjects which you have to learn and pass exams on, but you can obtain that knowledge however you like - textbooks, flashcards, revision guides, Wikipedia etc. The medical school may provide a reading list as a guide, but that's all it is - a guide. The best thing to do is go to the library and see which particular books appear to be the best for you.

    Some people get by just on lecture slides, which is fine, but I was a neurotic snowflake during pre-clinical medicine and a bit of a textbook geek, so if you want my recommendations...

    Pre-clinical

    Anatomy: Gray's Anatomy for Students for the pictures, Clinical Anatomy by Ellis for the text, Anatomy at a Glance for musculoskeletal cramming.

    Physiology: Pocock's Human Physiology, Medical Sciences by Naish et al

    Biochemistry: Medical Sciences by Naish.

    Pharmacology: Rang and Dale's Pharmacology, Medical Pharamacology at a Glance

    Pathology: Underwood's General and Systematic Pathology

    Clinical skills: MacCleod's Clinical Examination, Oxford Handbook of Clinical Examination and Practical Skills, GeekyMedics

    Psychology/Sociology: Definitely lecture slides.

    Clinical medicine

    General medicine: OHCM, Medicine at a Glance

    Surgery: Surgical Talk

    O&G: Impey's O&G

    Psychiatry: Oxford Handbook of Psychiatry, Psychiatry at a Glance

    Anaesthetics: Anaesthetics at a Glance

    Paediatrics: Paediatrics and Child Health by Rudolf et al

    A&E: Adult Emergency Medicine at a glance.


    COI: None whatsoever, I just really like the at a Glance series.
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    OHCM the only book I ever read at medical school crew checking in.

    (Original post by EnterNamehereplz)
    why do you want to do the bare minimum? Surely you aspire to be a great doctor and be the best in your field?
    Get out.
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    I spent hundreds of pounds on books while I was a medical student and I regret every penny! The internet is your best friend, trust me! And if you really want a text, take it out of the library
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    Another person who's not a fan of textbooks here. I always found there was more than was possible to learn in the lectures alone, why bog yourself down with more information

    Textbooks I actually used:

    Preclinical:
    Clinically Oriented Anatomy
    Human Histology
    McMinn's Color Atlas of Human Anatomy

    Clinical:
    Data Interpretation for Medical Students
    EMQs in Clinical Medicine
    The Unofficial Guide to Passing OSCEs

    Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine and the handbook of Clinical Specialities both get an honorable mention, but I actually haven't used them much either
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    (Original post by EnterNamehereplz)
    why do you want to do the bare minimum? Surely you aspire to be a great doctor and be the best in your field?
    Nah m8.
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    (Original post by EnterNamehereplz)
    why do you want to do the bare minimum? Surely you aspire to be a great doctor and be the best in your field?
    Surely I do, as every doctor should. Simply, because we have no choice - with people souls in our hands.
    Though, that doesn't mean you have to be a book geek and read every single word you can get in the topic, but rather you should read what you NEED to know at your level.

    For me now, as an udergrad, I just need to know a thing on everything in medicine without digging deep, to build a simple yet firm framework base of knowledge that I can rely on and construct upon.

    "Just learn what you WANT TO DO"
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    There are no books which you "have" to read. There are subjects which you have to learn and pass exams on, but you can obtain that knowledge however you like - textbooks, flashcards, revision guides, Wikipedia etc. The medical school may provide a reading list as a guide, but that's all it is - a guide. The best thing to do is go to the library and see which particular books appear to be the best for you.

    Some people get by just on lecture slides, which is fine, but I was a neurotic snowflake during pre-clinical medicine and a bit of a textbook geek, so if you want my recommendations...

    Pre-clinical

    Anatomy: Gray's Anatomy for Students for the pictures, Clinical Anatomy by Ellis for the text, Anatomy at a Glance for musculoskeletal cramming.

    Physiology: Pocock's Human Physiology, Medical Sciences by Naish et al

    Biochemistry: Medical Sciences by Naish.

    Pharmacology: Rang and Dale's Pharmacology, Medical Pharamacology at a Glance

    Pathology: Underwood's General and Systematic Pathology

    Clinical skills: MacCleod's Clinical Examination, Oxford Handbook of Clinical Examination and Practical Skills, GeekyMedics

    Psychology/Sociology: Definitely lecture slides.

    Clinical medicine

    General medicine: OHCM, Medicine at a Glance

    Surgery: Surgical Talk

    O&G: Impey's O&G

    Psychiatry: Oxford Handbook of Psychiatry, Psychiatry at a Glance

    Anaesthetics: Anaesthetics at a Glance

    Paediatrics: Paediatrics and Child Health by Rudolf et al

    A&E: Adult Emergency Medicine at a glance.


    COI: None whatsoever, I just really like the at a Glance series.
    seems to be a decent list.Thnx
 
 
 
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