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    I would like to start my revision for my GCSE's a few months before but I'm not sure how to set it out. What should I do a few months before?Should I focus on memorising notes and testing myself? How many times should I recap a topic/ how many recap sessions do I need to do to make a topic stick? When should I start doing past papers? What revision should I do a week before the exam and the day before?

    Any advice is appreciated and you don't have to answer all those questions. Thanksss
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    These questions are not specific enough and are very subjective. Different things work for different people.
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    (Original post by love4daisy)
    I would like to start my revision for my GCSE's a few months before but I'm not sure how to set it out. What should I do a few months before?Should I focus on memorising notes and testing myself? How many times should I recap a topic/ how many recap sessions do I need to do to make a topic stick? When should I start doing past papers? What revision should I do a week before the exam and the day before?

    Any advice is appreciated and you don't have to answer all those questions. Thanksss
    1. A few months before, you should be focusing on classwork and homework as well as revision, which can be difficult to manage. I think it would be best to write your notes at the end of each topic for each subject as it makes it much easier when your GCSEs do arrive. But it depends on you; you may want to test yourself at the end of every week or topic to see what you have learnt. Don't leave your notes/revision resources too late though.

    2. Answered above really, although (again) it depends on you as a learner. You'll be revising continuously throughout the year anyway due to mocks. I would advise that you cross-reference when you write your notes (from your book, BBCBitesize, revision guides, etc). It's up to you though.

    3. It honestly depends on the person; some can remember it when they first learn it, but for others, it takes a little while for it to stick. Repetition is key, though. And, if you don't understand something fully/half understand something, work at it until you do (this will help it to stick).

    4. Whenever. Usually it's best when you've got a basic understanding of the whole topic in the past paper as then you'll be able to see what you understand and what you don't understand more clearly.

    5. By the time your exams arrive, you'll know what you need to do a week/a day before an exam. Usually, you're able to arrange things into importance or heaviness of content/revision; you know what's imperative to do first, and what you can leave til last. For example,the day before my first English Lit exam, I spent 3/4 of the day doing media revision for Tuesday's exam, then spent the last part of the day reading through my notes and essay plans for English because I knew media required a little more work.

    But, don't forget, it really depends on the person; this is just advice. Your mocks will also help you to see how you revise best as well. You seem like a really organised person for planning what to do months prior, so I'm sure you'll do amazingly. I've just finished my GCSEs and, with the amount of mock weeks we had (with 14 exams in each week), most people actually felt less stressed than they thought they would. So, try not to worry! Good luck!
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    (Original post by KirstyBishop)
    1. A few months before, you should be focusing on classwork and homework as well as revision, which can be difficult to manage. I think it would be best to write your notes at the end of each topic for each subject as it makes it much easier when your GCSEs do arrive. But it depends on you; you may want to test yourself at the end of every week or topic to see what you have learnt. Don't leave your notes/revision resources too late though.

    2. Answered above really, although (again) it depends on you as a learner. You'll be revising continuously throughout the year anyway due to mocks. I would advise that you cross-reference when you write your notes (from your book, BBCBitesize, revision guides, etc). It's up to you though.

    3. It honestly depends on the person; some can remember it when they first learn it, but for others, it takes a little while for it to stick. Repetition is key, though. And, if you don't understand something fully/half understand something, work at it until you do (this will help it to stick).

    4. Whenever. Usually it's best when you've got a basic understanding of the whole topic in the past paper as then you'll be able to see what you understand and what you don't understand more clearly.

    5. By the time your exams arrive, you'll know what you need to do a week/a day before an exam. Usually, you're able to arrange things into importance or heaviness of content/revision; you know what's imperative to do first, and what you can leave til last. For example,the day before my first English Lit exam, I spent 3/4 of the day doing media revision for Tuesday's exam, then spent the last part of the day reading through my notes and essay plans for English because I knew media required a little more work.

    But, don't forget, it really depends on the person; this is just advice. Your mocks will also help you to see how you revise best as well. You seem like a really organised person for planning what to do months prior, so I'm sure you'll do amazingly. I've just finished my GCSEs and, with the amount of mock weeks we had (with 14 exams in each week), most people actually felt less stressed than they thought they would. So, try not to worry! Good luck!
    Thank you so much. this really helped
 
 
 
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