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Have a presentation to give tomorrow, scared of public speaking, AMA Watch

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    Are you good at public speaking? Why are you good?

    presentation is for a EEE project in my uni.
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    The day before is pretty late to start on your public speaking skills. But this is a crash course:

    1. Body language. Don't stand behind the computer standing still, reading off a script, and awkwardly clicking the mouse or pressing the keyboard every now and then. If there's a clicker/laser pointer, use that instead, and stand in front of the podium so you can actually interact in the room. Don't stand in one spot - move around naturally. If you're stuck with mouse and keyboard, swing it round to the front. Use your hands a lot as you speak, look at people, gesture at them. If this makes you nervous, look slightly above them.
    Check this out.

    2. Memorise your speech beforehand. Not word-for-word, but know the key topics and the order that you're going to talk about them in. You sound robotic when you read off a script or regurgitate something pre-memorised; this also makes you flustered when you accidentally go off-script, so just have the key points in your head and talk about them naturally. Communicate the info you want to communicate however it comes to you in the moment.

    3. Practise the above a lot. Run through the whole thing a few times before tomorrow.

    4. If you can find opportunities to pause for a few seconds, that's great. It helps people follow your presentation, and stops them being bombarded with info 24/7. Fit in rhetorical questions like "So what happens next?", "So why do we do this?", "So what's the point in all of that?" Gives a few seconds that you don't just have information FLYING at the audience and marker, lets them catch up with you, and preps them with what you're going to go onto next.

    5. Don't worry. Universities don't expect you to be great public speakers, they just expect you to have basic level communication. You can ignore all of the above and still pass well. They don't want you to give a TED-talk quality presentation (I've been to academic conferences and seen some pretty *****y presentations from experts in the field!), they just want you to be able to talk about a subject for a little bit.

    6. If you have a powerpoint, don't just read off the slides. Let imagery on the powerpoint evoke what you're trying to say, have things that reinforce what you're saying, and talk around what's on the slides.
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    (Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
    The day before is pretty late to start on your public speaking skills. But this is a crash course:

    1. Body language. Don't stand behind the computer standing still, reading off a script, and awkwardly clicking the mouse or pressing the keyboard every now and then. If there's a clicker/laser pointer, use that instead, and stand in front of the podium so you can actually interact in the room. Don't stand in one spot - move around naturally. If you're stuck with mouse and keyboard, swing it round to the front. Use your hands a lot as you speak, look at people, gesture at them. If this makes you nervous, look slightly above them.
    Check this out.

    2. Memorise your speech beforehand. Not word-for-word, but know the key topics and the order that you're going to talk about them in. You sound robotic when you read off a script or regurgitate something pre-memorised; this also makes you flustered when you accidentally go off-script, so just have the key points in your head and talk about them naturally. Communicate the info you want to communicate however it comes to you in the moment.

    3. Practise the above a lot. Run through the whole thing a few times before tomorrow.

    4. If you can find opportunities to pause for a few seconds, that's great. It helps people follow your presentation, and stops them being bombarded with info 24/7. Fit in rhetorical questions like "So what happens next?", "So why do we do this?", "So what's the point in all of that?" Gives a few seconds that you don't just have information FLYING at the audience and marker, lets them catch up with you, and preps them with what you're going to go onto next.

    5. Don't worry. Universities don't expect you to be great public speakers, they just expect you to have basic level communication. You can ignore all of the above and still pass well. They don't want you to give a TED-talk quality presentation (I've been to academic conferences and seen some pretty *****y presentations from experts in the field!), they just want you to be able to talk about a subject for a little bit.

    6. If you have a powerpoint, don't just read off the slides. Let imagery on the powerpoint evoke what you're trying to say, have things that reinforce what you're saying, and talk around what's on the slides.
    Ugh so many rules I feel dizzy
 
 
 
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