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    To find the "argument" you must find the angle in the triangle from the x-axis.

    Do you find the argument from the positive bit of the x-axis always?
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    (Original post by timebent)
    To find the "argument" you must find the angle in the triangle from the x-axis.

    Do you find the argument from the positive bit of the x-axis always?
    Yes by definition. It is always from the positive Re(z) axis.
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    Angle from the positive x axis yes
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    (Original post by B_9710)
    Yes by definition. It is always from the positive Re(z) axis.
    ok right because i was a little confused thanks
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    Yeah from the positive real axis (x). Always from the right side so the positive side 1st or 4th quadrant.


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    Do note that in some cases the principal argument is in [0, 2\pi) and in that scenario, you'll always measure anti-clockwise from the positive real axis. In other cases, however, the principal argument branch cut is (-\pi. \pi] and in that case, you'll measure counterclockwise for positive angles and clockwise for negative angles.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Do note that in some cases the principal argument is in [0, 2\pi) and in that scenario, you'll always measure anti-clockwise from the positive real axis. In other cases, however, the principal argument branch cut is (-\pi. \pi] and in that case, you'll measure counterclockwise for positive angles and clockwise for negative angles.
    is it? that's interesting, what sort of cases would these be?
    i just though generally the values taken could range from negative pi all the way to positive pi only
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    (Original post by timebent)
    is it? that's interesting, what sort of cases would these be?
    i just though generally the values taken could range from negative pi all the way to positive pi only
    Some people prefer to use [0, 2\pi) others prefer (-\pi, \pi], it comes down to a matter of taste. In exams, you'll either be specified which or you can use either if not specified.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Some people prefer to use [0, 2\pi) others prefer (-\pi, \pi], it comes down to a matter of taste. In exams, you'll either be specified which or you can use either if not specified.
    Ah right i see. Thanks!
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    (Original post by timebent)
    Ah right i see. Thanks!
    You'll come across some examples and questions later on in FP1 when you learn about significance of the 4 different quadrants and how they determine the argument (in terms of how it's worked out and how it's measured).


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    (Original post by Chittesh14)
    You'll come across some examples and questions later on in FP1 when you learn about significance of the 4 different quadrants and how they determine the argument (in terms of how it's worked out and how it's measured).


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    sounds fun, teaching myself it too much fun xD
    probably better than learning something like stats, i hear from all my stats buddies about all the weird symbols and sign you gotta use to specify whatever lol
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Some people prefer to use [0, 2\pi) others prefer (-\pi, \pi], it comes down to a matter of taste. In exams, you'll either be specified which or you can use either if not specified.
    In exams I think the exam boards expect you to use -pi to pi as the argument range.
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    (Original post by an_atheist)
    In exams I think the exam boards expect you to use -pi to pi as the argument range.
    Yeah, that's what's In my book too.


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    (Original post by an_atheist)
    In exams I think the exam boards expect you to use -pi to pi as the argument range.
    I prefer [0, 2\pi) and use that myself, haven't been penalised. (Edexcel)
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    Should say in the question whether it is  [0,2\pi ) \text{ or } (-\pi , \pi ] .
 
 
 
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