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    Thanks to my big bro I have a 'high flying' summer sales job open to me in London. I am currently working for Sainsbury's (yes you may laugh) and I'm ready to hand in my notice. My manager said you usually need to give 3 weeks notice to quit, but I don't have 3 weeks. I spoke to one of my collegues today and she said that by law, I only need to give them a weeks notice, is this true?
    Where can I find out about laws relating to this?
    Thanks
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    (Original post by PuffDaddy)
    Thanks to my big bro I have a 'high flying' summer sales job open to me in London. I am currently working for Sainsbury's (yes you may laugh) and I'm ready to hand in my notice. My manager said you usually need to give 3 weeks notice to quit, but I don't have 3 weeks. I spoke to one of my collegues today and she said that by law, I only need to give them a weeks notice, is this true?
    Where can I find out about laws relating to this?
    Thanks
    Citizens Advice Bureau:
    http://www.adviceguide.org.uk/index/...oyer_entitled_
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    In the states you normally give 2 weeks notice.
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    Well, you could always tell them over a coffee or something that you think that over the last few months you've grown apart and maybe should take a break from it, that should work and won't hurt their feelings too much .
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    whats the normal procedure for giving notice? do u have to give it in writing or is it enough just to tell your manager? i need to give mine in next tuesday


    oh and i think u are legally meant to give a weeks notice (although my company want me to give a months)
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    (Original post by priya)
    oh and i think u are legally meant to give a weeks notice (although my company want me to give a months)
    It should be in your contract that you signed when you first got the job... and if that says a month's notice then thats the law. I think that's why they get you to sign it as soon as possible :rolleyes:
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    Just act like an ******* and get sacked (probably not a good idea)
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    (Original post by britishseapower)
    Just act like an ******* and get sacked (probably not a good idea)
    Probably not - never a good idea to get sacked.

    As mentioned, you will have to work the notice stated in your contract.
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    I had the same problem when I left my last job. I was told I had to give one months notice but I thought *******s to that because I hadn't even been working there for a year. I looked it up and I found out legally, that I only had to give a weeks notice. I also read that you don't HAVE to work your notice, because if another job requires you to start soon it's not exactly convienient, so in your notice write something like this.

    'Unfortunatly, I am required to start (the new job) (date) and therefore will be unable to work my full notice period.
    I have enjoyed my time at sainsburys and am grateful for the skills I have aquired during my time with the company. I will do my best to ensure the transition period runs as smoothly as possible...blah blah blah...'

    It's totally ok to do that, in fact, legally you do not even have to tell them why you are leaving.
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    If you don't work your notice a company is may try to reclaim (or withhold) pay from you to make up to your notice period (just as if they fired you without notice they would have to pay you as if you had worked your notice) - this isn't legally allowed but they usually try it on anyway

    It depends on what is in your contract and also how long you've been working with the company

    http://www.adviceguide.org.uk/nw/ind...orkofdismissal
 
 
 
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