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    I've got a past paper for London Examinations (?) French from 1999 or so that's got Module 2 on it..
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    Modular A-levels existed. But I think the arrangement was like present-day GCSEs: London may have done a linear and a modular spec., etc.
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    I think Maths used to be modular before C2000.
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    I know that Maths used to be four modules, not six, before 2000, but I cannot say much more than that.
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    Why is it that the MEI whine so much that Curriculum 2000 destroyed maths A level?
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    According to Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Level_(UK),
    the change to modular syllabi came in the 90s, and linear ones had become rarer.

    According to http://www.cre.org.uk/index.html (beware - bias prevalent), the modular specs came in the 90s [look in Chemistry].

    According to http://www.english.heacademy.ac.uk/a...transition.pdf, page 51, in English [Lit], LitLang, and Lang, there were no 'modules' until Curriculum 2000.

    http://www.ucas.com/candq/ukquals/ukquals05.pdf has some good info from page 84 on the former A-level. Apparently, at least 30% of the A-level had to come from a final (quasi-synoptic) exam. Some of the info about current specs is outdated, but it's quite informative.
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    (Original post by Nichrome)
    Why is it that the MEI whine so much that Curriculum 2000 destroyed maths A level?
    Not sure - my guess would be its probably because they can't set as wide a range of questions as before. If you have modules in which certain topics can only be tested you lose the 'synoptic' element sort of - I know you couldn't possibly hope to do C4 without C1, so its still synoptic in that sense, but its not AS synoptic as having one paper at the end e.g. STEP/AEA - a 3 hour exam and the questions can test absolutely anything. Maybe having modules makes the questions a bit easier.
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    As of Autumn 1995, when the Letts "Study Guide" for Advanced Level Mathematics came out:

    AEB (Modular)

    AS
    0880 (Maths)
    0881 (Pure Maths)
    0882 (Mech, with (C) or without (W) coursework)
    0883 (Stats, W/C ibid)

    A-level
    0680 WS / WM / WD / CS / CM / CD (Maths, S=Stats, M=Mech, D=Discrete, W=Without Coursework, C=Coursework)

    Each paper seems to be synoptic: Paper 1 is Pure Maths, Paper 2 Stats, Paper 3 Mech, Paper 4 Discrete, each 2.5 hrs, but 2hrs for each of the applied units if coursework is done.
    0880 Maths AS has its own paper, Pure Mathematics and Applications.


    Cambridge Linear

    8472 AS
    9200 A-level

    Pap1 = Pure, Pap2 = Pure-Mech-Stat, Pap3 = Pure-Mech, Pap4 = Pure-Stat
    1.5 hrs each if counted for AS, 3hrs each for full A.
    1,2, and either 3 or 4 for AS; all of them for the full A.

    "All papers contain questions of various lengths with no restriction on the number of questions which may be attempted".


    Cambridge Modular

    8521 AS Maths
    8522 AS Pure Maths
    9501 A Maths
    9502 A Pure Maths

    3 for AS, 6 for A.
    Pap1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 are Pure. There is M1-3, S1-4, and a coursework C1.
    8521 = P1, P2, (M/S)1
    8522 = P1, P2, P3
    9501 = P1, P2, P3, 3 from {P4, M1-3, S1-4, C1)
    9502 = P1-6

    All exams 1.5 hrs.
    "All papers contain questions of various lengths with no restriction on the number of questions which may be attempted".


    ULEAC (London) Modular

    AS
    8406 = P1 M1
    8407 = P1 T1
    8397 = P1 D1

    A
    9371 = P1-2, M1-2
    9384 = P1-2, M1, T1
    9385 = P1-2, T1-2
    9386 = P1-2, T1, D1
    9393 = P1-2, M1, D1

    T = S, I think. All papers 1.5 hrs. Very familiar, I'm sure.


    NEAB

    AS
    3631 Maths (Methods & Applied) = Pap1

    A
    4631 meth & appl = Pap1, Pap2
    4633 meth & mech = Pap1, Pap3
    4634 meth & stat = Pap1, Pap4

    Pap1, Pap2 are Methods & Applied {no idea what that means}, Pap3 Mech, Pap4 Stat. All papers 3hrs.



    NEAB SMP16-19

    3136 AS Maths (Foundations, Introductory Calculus, Functions) = 1 × 2hr paper, 2 × [1h + 1.25h problem solving], coursework 6-8hr each
    4136 A Maths (Found, IntrCalc, Func, MathMeth, CalcMeth) = 1 × 3h, 5 × [1h + 1.25h problem solving], coursework 6-8hr each

    For each "optional unit there are half-coursework assignments".

    The book is really not clear about it. What is "problem solving" in this exam?


    Oxford

    9850

    Maths AS = Pap1 (not P1), Pap2 (not P2), (M/S/D)1
    Pure maths AS = Pap1, Pap2, P1 -OR- Pap1, P2, "and ONE other option" {including M/S/D1?}
    Stats AS = S1, S2, "ONE other option"
    Mech AS = M1, M2, "ONE other option"

    Maths A = Pap1-4, [1 of P1, M1, S1, D1], [another of P1, M1, S1, D1, M2, S2, D2] {no P2?} "in an allowed combination"
    Pure Maths A = Pap1-4, P1, P2

    All papers 1.25 hrs. PapX are "Pure Maths with Applications". P1, 2 are {Further?} Pure. M = Mech, S=Stat, D=Discrete.


    Oxford (Nuffield)

    8770 Maths AS = Pap1 (Pure maths with applications), Pap2 (Pure maths, statistics & probability), Coursework
    9870 Maths A = Pap1, 2, 3 (Pure maths and distribution), Coursework, plus one of Pap41 (M1), Pap42 (Discrete maths), Pap43 (Stats), Pap44 (Complex numbers & NM), Pap45 (Surfaces), Pap46 (History of maths), Pap47 (Maths, Music & Art), Pap48 (M2)

    Pap1 = 1.25h, Pap2 = 2.5h, Pap3 = 2h, Pap4s = 1.25h, Coursework between 4 & 10 sides of A4, up to 4 pieces.


    Oxford and Cambridge (Tier)

    ????

    Maths (Foundation) AS = Pap1 (Pure maths, Stats and Kinematics)
    Maths (Higher) AS = Pap1,4 (both Pure maths, Stats and Kinematics)
    Maths (F.) A = Pap1,2 (Pure maths, stats, kinematics & mech)
    Maths (H.) A = Pap1,2,3 (all Pure maths, Stats and Kinematics)

    Pap1 all 12-16 compulsory, 2.5h; Pap2 = all 3 + 4/7, 2.5h; Pap3 = all 7 compulsory, 2h; Pap4, 4/6, 1.5h
    Rather weird I think.


    Oxford and Cambridge (MEI)

    9665

    Maths (MEI) AS = P1, P2, one of M1, S1, D&D
    Maths (MEI) A = P1, P2, P3, 2 from M1, M2, S1, S2, D&D, subject to "rules of dependency"; and any one of the others.

    All exam papers 1h 30m.
    P1-6 were pure, M1-3 mech, S1-3 stats, DE differential equations, D&D decision and discrete mathematics.
    P2 had a 6-8h coursework on numerical methods, P3 had a comprehension question "of up to 1 hour"; P4-5 had 3/4 questions to do; P6 had 3/5 questions, one on each option [?]; M1-2 had an assignment each; S1 had an assigment on "data. Exploration of single variable data"; S2 had a bivariate data assignment; S3 had one on hypothesis testing; DE had a modelling assingment.


    NICCEA

    No Advanced Supplementary.

    Pure Maths = Pap1, Pap2
    Pure M. & Mech = Pap1, 3, 4
    Pure M. & Stats = Pap1, 5, 6
    Pure M. & Applied = Pap1, 3, 5
    Further M. = Pap2, 4, 6

    Pap1: Pure Maths A1, 10+4/5 questions, 3hrs.
    Pap2: Pure Maths A2, 8/10, 3hrs.
    Pap3: Mechanics B1, 4 + 2/3, 1.5 hrs.
    Pap4: Mechanics B2, 4 + 2/3, 1.5 hrs.
    Pap5: Statistics C1, 4 + 2/3, 1.5 hrs.
    Pap6: Statistics C2, 4 + 2/3, 1.5 hrs.


    WJEC

    Maths AS = Pap1
    Mech AS = Pap2
    Stats AS = Pap3
    Appl. Maths AS = Pap5
    Maths A = Pap1, one of Pap2,3,5
    Applied Maths A = Pap3, Pap5
    Pure Maths A = Pap1, Pap 4

    All papers 3hr.
    Pap1 = Mathematical methods A1
    Pap2 = Mechanics A2
    Pap3 = Statistics A3
    Pap4 = Further mathematical methods A4
    Pap5 = Mechanics and Statistics A5


    WJEC (Modular)

    Pure M. AS = P1, P2
    Maths AS = P1, (M/S)1
    Mech AS = M1, M2
    Stats AS = S1, S2
    Appl. Maths AS = M1, S1
    Maths A = P1, P2, one of P3, M1, M2, S1, S2, according to dependency rules
    (there is an error of "Applied Maths" here, appearing twice as an "A")
    Applied Maths A = M1, M2, S1, S2
    Pure Maths A = P1, P2, P3, P4

    Each module 1.5h
    P = Mathematical Methods, M = Mech, S = Stats.


    And the Scottish equivalent back then:
    SEB

    Maths Higher = Pap1, Pap2
    Pap1 2h and short questions with a problem solving exercise, Pap2 2.5 h and extended questions.
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    I know that Maths used to be four modules
    Education must come and go round in circles - the exam boards are returning to a 4 module A-level specification when the revised specs are introduced for first teaching from September 2008. And I thought that it was a new idea - if we wait long enough, perhaps the six modules spec will return again as well!
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    (Original post by anon53)
    Education must come and go round in circles - the exam boards are returning to a 4 module A-level specification when the revised specs are introduced for first teaching from September 2008. And I thought that it was a new idea - if we wait long enough, perhaps the six modules spec will return again as well!
    The mathematics specification will only change in 2011, and unless I’m mistaken, it will remain as six modules. The sciences, as well as music IIRC, will also remain as six modules.
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    TSR Community Team
    Pre-2000 modular A Levels did exist, though if my school wa sanything to go by they were far from the popular choice. Pretty much every subject at my school was fully linear right up until the last people to take the old A Levels (my year). The main exception was in maths (and further maths) which half the mark came from module exams/coursework and the other half from a final exam. This was as my school choose the SMP 16-19 course for maths. Other schools would have had the option for all linear or all modular courses I guess

    (Original post by michaelyus)
    NEAB SMP16-19

    3136 AS Maths (Foundations, Introductory Calculus, Functions) = 1 × 2hr paper, 2 × [1h + 1.25h problem solving], coursework 6-8hr each
    4136 A Maths (Found, IntrCalc, Func, MathMeth, CalcMeth) = 1 × 3h, 5 × [1h + 1.25h problem solving], coursework 6-8hr each

    For each "optional unit there are half-coursework assignments".

    The book is really not clear about it. What is "problem solving" in this exam?
    That does not make complete sense to what my maths course was like, but I did mine in 1999-2001, so things could have changed slightly since the above was true.

    In repsonse to your question 'what is problem solving' - when I did the course, there was a problem solving unit available.

    The basis of this course is that pure ('core') topics are covered by the 3 hour final exam and work 50% of the final mark. Applied units (stats/mechanics etc) are worth another 50% and are assessed 60% by 1 hour module exam and 40% coursework - the expection, I think being the problem solving unit.

    10 units in total, each contributing about 10% of the course.

    1st year Maths units
    Pure
    Foundations
    Functions
    Introductory Calculus

    Applied
    Living with uncertainty (basic stats)
    Newton's Laws of Motion (basic mechanics)
    Problem solving - the exam consisted of 15/20 minutes reading over some information/a situation and then an hour to answer some unseen question on that situation. Could have covered anything in GCSE and I think the early A Level work you'd covered.

    2nd Year Maths Units
    Pure
    Mathematical Methods
    Calculus Methods

    Applied
    My school gave you the choice of 2 stats units or 2 mechanics units

    Stats - one on normal distribution and one on other distributions and chi-squares etc

    Mechanics - covered circular motion, power, energy, work, centre of mass and all similar things. (I did these)

    There were other mechanics and possibly other stats units which my school didn't offer.

    My further maths was also the same:

    1st year further maths
    Pure
    Mathematical Structure (proofs, sets, group theory)
    Matrices
    Complex Numbers

    Applied

    Networks (basically the sort of stuff on networks and algorimths from D1 and D2)
    The 2 stats unis available as options mentioned above

    2nd year further maths
    Pure
    Numerical methods
    Differential Equations

    Applied
    Conic Sections (can't remember course work for this!)
    Information and Coding (can't remember coursework for this!)

    Over all you did about 8 hours of exam and 4/5 pieces of course work for maths and something similar for further maths. There was the chance to resit the modules, but it wasn't common practice at all and my school never offered it to anyone. I only know it was possible as my best mate had a cousin doing the same course as us at another school somewhere else.
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    OK, thanks for clearing that up. It seems as though the real modularisation came in the 90s, as most of the Maths ones appear to be in 1995. I wouldn't be surprise if they changed for your year though.
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    (Original post by michaelyus)
    OK, thanks for clearing that up. It seems as though the real modularisation came in the 90s, as most of the Maths ones appear to be in 1995. I wouldn't be surprise if they changed for your year though.
    Proper modularisation of A Levels, in the sence that modular courses being the only option didn't come in until the people starting in 2000. Prior to that some, perhaps all subjects had an option of a modular course with some exam boards. But perhaps more common still were linear courses, even in maths I'd guess too.
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    Yeah, the "formalised" modularisation spread through all the whole A-level system (well, with a few exceptions) with Curriuclum 2000. But modular versions were being brought out in the 90s: and linear courses were still much more popular, more so in the arts & humanities. One of our philosophy teachers (the youngest) said he was the first year to do the modular economics specification, placing that firmly in the 90s.
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    What was probably offered by most exam baords during the 90s were multiple versions of each subject, kind of like what is on offer now with many/all GCSE subjects. An exam board would offer a linear course and a modular course (perhpas more than one version of each).

    With GCSEs, a similar thing is evident now - for example, I believe OCR has a modular maths course (based on the student doing 2 or 3 of 10 leveled modules and a two-tier final exam) and a linear maths course (which is a pretty standard GCSE linear course, now with 2 tiers and 2 papers).
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    Yeah, modular and linear options from the boards coexisted.
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    I think that it is acknowledged that MEI were the first to go modular and this was in 1990. I have seen a report entitled 'Five years on' which was published in 1995 that talks about its implementation. In Mathematics most other boards went modular for first teaching in 1996, but I don't know about other subjects, except that they all certainly did in 2000, what with Curriculum 2000.
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    (Original post by slickster)
    I think that it is acknowledged that MEI were the first to go modular and this was in 1990. I have seen a report entitled 'Five years on' which was published in 1995 that talks about its implementation. In Mathematics most other boards went modular for first teaching in 1996, but I don't know about other subjects, except that they all certainly did in 2000, what with Curriculum 2000.
    There was certainly an option with some boards for modular A Level Chemistry (and presumably other sciences) from at least 96/97 as I came a cross the past papers for them whilst revising Chemistry. Not sure when they were implemented and despite my school having the past papers, I don't think they ever taught that modular course - always had linear.
 
 
 

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