Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am considering on moving schools to do my A-levels (I will be in year 11 in September) but the sixth forms that I want to go to do different exam boards for the subjects that I want to study. Is it a good idea to study in a different exam board at A-level than at GCSE?
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I don't see why it wouldn't be; many of the things you learn at GCSE won't be needed or you'll relearn it in more detail anyway. Most of the things you learn is the same across all exam boards so there won't be much difference.
    The only major difference really is how the exam paper physically looks, I've always hated how bland and horrible an OCR paper is compared to other exam boards.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    It makes no difference. I am staying at the school I went to for Year 7-11 for college. For my A Levels, I am doing either History or English Literature, then French and Spanish. I did GCSE History with Edexcel and A Level will be OCR. I did AQA English Lit for GCSE and A Level English Lit is also OCR. French and Spanish were both GCSE AQA and will be both A Level AQA. Usually, the schools choose the exam boards for the teacher's knowledge on the subject and how good they consider that exam board to be. The things you learn during GCSE, for a lot of science/maths subjects, no matter what exam board, cover more or less the same things. So if you change exam boards for A Level, you will know the same background knowledge as everyone else, regardless of what GCSE exam board you all did said subject in. The subjects such as English Lit, History, Geography etc. (where exam board's teaching content varies widely throughout each one) usually are the subjects where you don't build on what you learned in GCSE but explore a different aspect of that subject. For example, GCSE History for me was 1903-1991, A Level is 1400-1850.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    It does not make a difference at all, don't worry

    The only subject I stayed on the same board for was Chemistry, and everything has gone alright so far for the other subjects (let's see if I'll say the same on results day, though :lol: )
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    It really doesn't make a difference. I used edexcel for triple science at GCSE and AQA at A level.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    The chances are that even your sixth form at your current school does not do the same board for A level as it does for GCSE for all its subjects. It makes absolutely no difference at all.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    No difference. Regarding adjusting to a new school, if you're good at making friends then there's nothing to worry about. Just remember that if you want to apply to university there will be a reference your teachers will write. So just smile and give them the best impression as they may not know you too well. I never did that so I'm screwed.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by george_c00per)
    It makes no difference. I am staying at the school I went to for Year 7-11 for college. For my A Levels, I am doing either History or English Literature, then French and Spanish. I did GCSE History with Edexcel and A Level will be OCR. I did AQA English Lit for GCSE and A Level English Lit is also OCR. French and Spanish were both GCSE AQA and will be both A Level AQA. Usually, the schools choose the exam boards for the teacher's knowledge on the subject and how good they consider that exam board to be. The things you learn during GCSE, for a lot of science/maths subjects, no matter what exam board, cover more or less the same things. So if you change exam boards for A Level, you will know the same background knowledge as everyone else, regardless of what GCSE exam board you all did said subject in. The subjects such as English Lit, History, Geography etc. (where exam board's teaching content varies widely throughout each one) usually are the subjects where you don't build on what you learned in GCSE but explore a different aspect of that subject. For example, GCSE History for me was 1903-1991, A Level is 1400-1850.
    Sorry that this is not at all relevant and out of context but what are you wanting to do when you're older (degree and career-wise)? I love your subject choices and mine are quite similar but I'm struggling to put my finger on a degree or career pathway for my subject passions.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Crabber25)
    Sorry that this is not at all relevant and out of context but what are you wanting to do when you're older (degree and career-wise)? I love your subject choices and mine are quite similar but I'm struggling to put my finger on a degree or career pathway for my subject passions.
    Haha don't worry it's fine

    Degree wise, I've changed my mind a lot, but for the most part it is usually a Modern Languages degree I'd like to do. I've thought about French and Spanish, Spanish and Russian, French and Arabic, and everything in between. Other than Modern Languages, I've thought about Law, History, Politics, English Literature and even Archaeology. This probably doesn't help that much seeing as though it's such a broad variety but hey ho. I don't have a clue what I want to do after though. Something where I can travel in my job hopefully, so maybe a diplomat or something along those lines. If the degree goes well, I might do a postgraduate but that really depends if I want to strap myself down to another few years of education.

    If you're going into A Levels next year like me, don't worry if you haven't decided what you want to do yet. A lot comes down on the subjects you enjoy during sixth form, so what you might have your mind on now could change come 2 years. What A Levels are you doing?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by bookl0ver)
    I am considering on moving schools to do my A-levels (I will be in year 11 in September) but the sixth forms that I want to go to do different exam boards for the subjects that I want to study. Is it a good idea to study in a different exam board at A-level than at GCSE?
    It makes no difference whatsoever, as the content - and exam/coursework style - will be different regardless of whether you stay with the same exam board or not. I had AQA for my GCSEs and A levels in English Language and English Literature... and the jump between them was the same as the shift between OCR GCSE History, and Edexcel A level History.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by george_c00per)
    Haha don't worry it's fine

    Degree wise, I've changed my mind a lot, but for the most part it is usually a Modern Languages degree I'd like to do. I've thought about French and Spanish, Spanish and Russian, French and Arabic, and everything in between. Other than Modern Languages, I've thought about Law, History, Politics, English Literature and even Archaeology. This probably doesn't help that much seeing as though it's such a broad variety but hey ho. I don't have a clue what I want to do after though. Something where I can travel in my job hopefully, so maybe a diplomat or something along those lines. If the degree goes well, I might do a postgraduate but that really depends if I want to strap myself down to another few years of education.

    If you're going into A Levels next year like me, don't worry if you haven't decided what you want to do yet. A lot comes down on the subjects you enjoy during sixth form, so what you might have your mind on now could change come 2 years. What A Levels are you doing?
    No that was helpful thank you for that! I am doing Spanish, History and Economics and likewise would love to travel when I have a job. I'd love to work in Spain perhaps but it seems to be that all Spanish people want to work here! I'm not really sure what I want to do though, maybe not too focused on another language I guess as you say it will be determined by which subjects I am most passionate for when I begin my A-levels.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Crabber25)
    No that was helpful thank you for that! I am doing Spanish, History and Economics and likewise would love to travel when I have a job. I'd love to work in Spain perhaps but it seems to be that all Spanish people want to work here! I'm not really sure what I want to do though, maybe not too focused on another language I guess as you say it will be determined by which subjects I am most passionate for when I begin my A-levels.
    Yeah, exactly it's all up to what A Levels you end up preferring. You've got a very strong choice of A Levels btw! Good luck in the future
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by george_c00per)
    Yeah, exactly it's all up to what A Levels you end up preferring. You've got a very strong choice of A Levels btw! Good luck in the future
    Thank you so much! You too, it was really lovely talking to you
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?
Help with your A-levels

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Rosette

Essay expert

Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

Uni match

Uni match

Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

Study planner

Create a study plan

Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

Study planner

Resources by subject

Everything from mind maps to class notes.

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student doing homework

Study tips from A* students

Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

Study help links and info

Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

Sponsored content:

HEAR

HEAR

Find out how a Higher Education Achievement Report can help you prove your achievements.

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.