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    In October I will (hopefully) be starting a 3yr Law degree, is there anything I can do to prepare myself for the degree over the long summer?

    I have not yet been emailed a reading list or anything as I assume this will happen when/if my place is confirmed on Results Day, but in the meantime I have bought 'How To Study Law' and plan on reading this. Any other suggestions? Thanks
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    Bumping this because I'm also interested, as I'm starting a Law degree this September too
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    you could also email the program lead if you can find the contact details via the universities site and then ask for optional/required reading as opposed to do nothing all summer?
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    You don't really need to do anything to prepare, it's highly unlikely that your tutors will be expecting you to have started pre-reading anything unless you have specifically been asked to.

    Don't buy any textbooks until you have seen a reading list or asked a tutor. They will most likely have a textbook or two in mind that will fit with the course content they have designed.

    If you really want to do a bit of reading, I'd recommend the law express revision books. They're quite light for getting a bit of an overview and they do come in handy at exam time for structuring answers and getting brief case facts/principles.

    The only other thing I'd say is consider what type of learner you are and how you can get the most out of your lectures. For some, a tablet helps to have lecture slides on to pre- download and follow. Others prefer to take notes on paper and some don't find advantages to taking notes at all. I personally found it really beneficial to have a small laptop that I used exclusively for lecture.

    Other than that, make sure you have a sturdy bag and enjoy your summer. Good luck
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    (Original post by Hann95)
    You don't really need to do anything to prepare, it's highly unlikely that your tutors will be expecting you to have started pre-reading anything unless you have specifically been asked to.

    Don't buy any textbooks until you have seen a reading list or asked a tutor. They will most likely have a textbook or two in mind that will fit with the course content they have designed.

    If you really want to do a bit of reading, I'd recommend the law express revision books. They're quite light for getting a bit of an overview and they do come in handy at exam time for structuring answers and getting brief case facts/principles.

    The only other thing I'd say is consider what type of learner you are and how you can get the most out of your lectures. For some, a tablet helps to have lecture slides on to pre- download and follow. Others prefer to take notes on paper and some don't find advantages to taking notes at all. I personally found it really beneficial to have a small laptop that I used exclusively for lecture.

    Other than that, make sure you have a sturdy bag and enjoy your summer. Good luck
    why buy anything just get a pdf of the book online. but preparing is still better then the first few months not having any clue what the lecturer is talking about.
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    You really don't need to prepare. You're going to work extremely hard for three years, have a break over summer and recharge your batteries.

    If you really do want to do some pre-reading, I'd recommend learning the structure of the courts, how precedent works, how a law is passed etc if you don't already know.


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    (Original post by sketchymofo2)
    why buy anything just get a pdf of the book online. but preparing is still better then the first few months not having any clue what the lecturer is talking about.
    Personally, I learn better off paper. I struggle to take information in as well from a screen up that's personal preference, hence why I said OP should figure out how they learn best. Plus you can't always find books or at least the full version as an online pdf.
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    I'm not reading any formal textbooks but I am preparing by reading the more generalist books like "Letters to a law student" and "The Legal Method". I'm also doing a legal internship at a city firm to boost my cv!
 
 
 
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