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    Just downloaded a virus by accident but I did a system restore to yesterday and it seems to have gone now.

    How can I make sure though and check that it isn't lurking somewhere?
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    (Original post by similarBlank)
    Just downloaded a virus by accident but I did a system restore to yesterday and it seems to have gone now.

    How can I make sure though and check that it isn't lurking somewhere?
    Run a decent free anti virus software and check your hard drive for anything dodgy.
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    (Original post by similarBlank)
    Just downloaded a virus by accident but I did a system restore to yesterday and it seems to have gone now.

    How can I make sure though and check that it isn't lurking somewhere?
    You can't. You lack the knowledge to assess and diagnose computer problems. This is also the wrong forum to ask for help on computers, a bit like going to a cycling forum to ask about fuel injection problems. Try these:

    http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/
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    download malwarebytes
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    (Original post by Atlas Thugged)
    download malwarebytes
    Literally just used it. 68 items detected and removed.
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    Boot into safe mode and scan again

    Is it windows?
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    If you got 68 positives then those infections came back from a lot longer than just today.
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    I just realised something:

    When I downloaded the virus it changed my homepage. My homepage reverted back to Google when I restored to an earlier date but now when I search for something here

    It's not searching in Google it's searching in the browser the virus put on there.
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    Save yourself trouble down the line. Get yourself a decent antivirus solution (most are paid and you get what you pay for) like Norton or Kaspersky and use that. While antivirus programs aren't necessary and you won't inherently get a virus form not having one, you'll thank yourself later on. Especially if you're unable to use the internet safely without downloading a virus.

    At the end of the day your biggest safety net is common sense. A lot of viruses come from clearly dodgy places. The website looks wrong, you're not doing something safe to begin with and so on. Use common sense and let the antivirus cover you when you do something dumb.

    (Original post by 999tigger)
    If you got 68 positives then those infections came back from a lot longer than just today.
    Not necessarily. We don't know what those 68 positives represent. They could all be cookies. They could be false positives. We can't actually guarantee they are related to an infection. It's even entirely possible they're related to the virus the OP downloaded.


    To answer the OP's question, you can't be sure. The only way to guarantee the virus is gone is to do a fresh install of the OS on a new drive. And even then it's possible you'd have an infection in the BIOS or something lurking in RAM. You may even have pread it to other devices on your network, making you vulnerable even under a fresh install. Viruses can live anywhere. The safest thing to do is backup all your important documents on an external media (USB, hard drive, etc.) and reinstall your OS. Ideally don't do it while connected to the network. Immediately install an antivirus program once the installation is complete and use it to check all your documents, again staying offline. Keep the computer isolated until you are 100% sure your machine is clean. Then proceed to reinstall any software you previously had. It's excessive and probably unnecessary but it's the only way you'll be absolutely sure you've gotten rid of it.
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    (Original post by similarBlank)
    I just realised something:

    When I downloaded the virus it changed my homepage. My homepage reverted back to Google when I restored to an earlier date but now when I search for something here

    It's not searching in Google it's searching in the browser the virus put on there.
    It's entirely possible (and even quite likely) that your system restore was not clean and virus free. It's also perfectly plausible that the virus made a copy of itself to get around you restoring from an earlier backup.

    Start with a decent antivirus software (after you've backed up your data) and if that doesn't help reinstall your OS from scratch.
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    (Original post by similarBlank)
    I just realised something:

    When I downloaded the virus it changed my homepage. My homepage reverted back to Google when I restored to an earlier date but now when I search for something here

    It's not searching in Google it's searching in the browser the virus put on there.

    eFast. You could either send your computer into your provider as part of a plan to get a checkup (e.g. PC World) or try more online antivirus solutions.

    For the latter I would recommend Avast first which you can access for free. If that fails there is paid software like Norton/McAfee but keep in mind the paid software is not necessarily better.

    Also, quick reminder as you probably know: don't run multiple anti virus at the same time otherwise they will conflict with each other.

    This is all you can do without a cybersecurity background.
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    Fair enough, just my opinion though which i'm happy to stick with.
    ofc if he wants to provide the report, then it would show up what and when.

    My real point was its likely his security and anti virus regime is poor.
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    (Original post by Moon_Lander)
    For the latter I would recommend Avast first which you can access for free. If that fails there is paid software like Norton/McAfee but keep in mind the paid software is not necessarily better.
    I'm afraid this isn't really true. Numerous articles and tests point towards the paid software always outperforming the free stuff. It's free for a reason. Some of them are downright terrible with only a small handful of free antivirus programs even being worth discussing. In tests Norton, Kaspersky and McAfee almost always come out on top, and usually with a significant margin compared to free software.

    You might not get viruses with free software. But it's undeniable that the best picks of paid software are better than free alternatives. There's good free and poor paid antivirus. But there's also a reason anyone that knows what they're talking about will recommend one of the big paid software (Norton, Kaspersky, McAfee, Bitdefender and so on). We might not always agree which is top but on the whole we do agree that they catch a much wider range of stuff than free antivirus.
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    Honestly at this point I'd just do a system wipe and reinstall the OS. That's the only easy, sure-fire way that you can be certain that it's all gone without getting an expert. You can invest in a paid antivirus like Kaspersky although this generally isn't necessary assuming you're careful on the internet.
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    The honest only way you can be absolutely sure you've got no viruses on your system is to back up important files, reformat the drive and reinstall windows, then install an antivirus and antimalware program and scan the backup you made, even then some can still remain in the boot sector,
    I often find myself doing low level wipes on some drives of the computers that I get from people, just to make sure. These days formatting and reinstalling is a last resort, but if you've scanned and removed to high hell and you're still getting positives, then you need to really look into reinstalling, multiple viruses (More than 20 i'd say) is just too many for me to viably think a removal will completely clear it. one or two is fine, but when it gets into double digits, there's a major problem somewhere.

    If you decide to go with reinstalling, you can get copies of windows cheap online, they're normally about £25 and you get an installer and a genuine activation code, they normally come from broken and unused computers, that have had windows de-activated.

    I would also advise you to take a SERIOUS look at what sites you're going on in the future, it's not impossible to get a virus when you're only using trusted sites but lets put it this way, I've not had a single known virus on my own PC in about 5 years, just false positives.

    NEVER agree to install junkware like toolbars and searches, apart from anything they're annoying. I'm not gonna school you on what to look out for at risk of sounding patronizing, but just try to be vigilant, if you're not sure, don't. Viruses can do more than make your computer run a bit dicky.

    @Moon_Lander more often than not software developers have found ways of multiple antiviruses not conflicting with eachother, even though it's still not advisable.
 
 
 
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