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    I'm starting my A Levels next academic year. The subjects I've applied for are Biology, Psychology and Mathematics (Mechanics). Could anyone give me an idea of how hard A Levels are? So, if GCSEs were 1 on a scale of 1 to 10, what would A Levels be?

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    I'd argue that it heavily depends on both the A levels and the student involved. From my experience, i found psychology easy enough in both years (though possibly due to my interest in it) and biology was relatively simple in the first year but complicated a bit in the second year. Both AQA. However, the AQA specifications for most science subjects changed after i started, so it could all be completely different now.

    I couldn't tell you about mechanical maths, but regular maths is regarded the hardest A level by far, unfortunately.
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    Okay, good question. Here's my personal opinion.
    I'd say each a level is almost twice or even thrice as difficult as the GCSE. However, since you're only doing 3 subjects, then as a whole, I think all of them together are equivalent to about 7 or 8 GCSEs, so it never quite feels like a lot, personally. I think people say they are a LOT more difficult just to make sure that people actually study for these, unlike GCSES which many achieve top grades for without a great deal of work.

    But in all honesty, you definitely NEED to study for tests at A level, but you could possibly get away with it for GCSE. the reason for this is because A level is in a lot of depth and if you understand it straight away, you still need to go home, learn it properly, and keep at it or you'll forget it.

    Your subjects are quite difficult. From your options I do bio and maths and if you've done further maths GCSE, then maths is very simple, especially C1, and C2 is just a little harder but you'll be fine. C3 and C4 are difficult but they're the year after next. S1 is the unit I did and it is difficult because you need to be very thorough. M1, from what I've heard is ok, it's got easy concepts applied in a difficult context, and it's more difficult than mechanics qs on the physics AS, if that is useful.
    Biology is actually fine, but again, you NEED to study or you'll forget, as it's got a lot of difficult terms and definitions and processes to remember, although it is extremely interesting and exam papers nowadays generally have a lot of applied information so you've got the opportunity to really show off how your own mind works.

    On a scale of 1 to 10... As a whole, probably 3 or 4 because few subjects and your mind remains focused on them. Per subject, probably like 7 or 8 because there's a lot of information that you can't go without studying.

    Hope this information helps,
    I wish you all the best next year!

    ☺️☺️☺️
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    I'm about to start A-Levels this September; I'm on the same boat as you. I've been told that roughly what you learn in 1 lesson of A-Level, you learn in 12 lessons of GCSE... If that makes sense?
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    Easy if you go to a good school. 3
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    (Original post by tianshan)
    I'm starting my A Levels next academic year. The subjects I've applied for are Biology, Psychology and Mathematics (Mechanics). Could anyone give me an idea of how hard A Levels are? So, if GCSEs were 1 on a scale of 1 to 10, what would A Levels be?

    Cheers!
    What exam board are you on for biology?
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    overall, having just finished Year 12
    GCSE's were about a 7 on 1-10 difficulty, A Levels so far have been about 5.
    I cant do essays or languages, so that's where all of the difficulty for me came form. I now study just maths (further) and the sciences which come fairly naturally to me.
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    (Original post by nousernametho)
    I'm about to start A-Levels this September; I'm on the same boat as you. I've been told that roughly what you learn in 1 lesson of A-Level, you learn in 12 lessons of GCSE... If that makes sense?
    I finished mine in June 2015, I would say at least 10 times as hard in difficulty
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    (Original post by tianshan)
    I'm starting my A Levels next academic year. The subjects I've applied for are Biology, Psychology and Mathematics (Mechanics). Could anyone give me an idea of how hard A Levels are? So, if GCSEs were 1 on a scale of 1 to 10, what would A Levels be?

    Cheers!
    In terms of Year 12:

    Biology is very content-heavy and some topics will seem a little difficult compared to the simplified nature of GCSE. Most of it is straightforward though and it becomes an issue of memorising a metric tonne of information.

    For maths, I'm assuming you are doing C1, C2 and M1? These modules are all really easy, especially if you do enough past papers to make your eyes bleed. Do one or two each week and then in the weeks/days running up to the exam, lock yourself in a room and do as much as you can.

    I haven't done Psychology so I have no idea what that entails.
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    Well if you didn't revise during GCSEs and just ' winged ' it then you're going to have to realise that not revising will result in U's at A-level .
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    Well, with my GCSEs I kinda just winged it and did quite well, but for AS I cannot do that at all, I found I need to pay so much more attention and so maybe 8 on a scale.

    But this may partly be because I hate my sixth form which I think is rubbish compared to my high school, even though pass rate is much better.
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    (Original post by nousernametho)
    I'm about to start A-Levels this September; I'm on the same boat as you. I've been told that roughly what you learn in 1 lesson of A-Level, you learn in 12 lessons of GCSE... If that makes sense?
    I definitely wouldn't go by rules like that, they're always made to scaremonger and they're almost always inaccurate. I was told at GCSE that an A at GCSE was worth a D in A level, I was also told that you needed to have at least all A's at GCSE to get anywhere near even a C at A level. Both are false, both qualifications are taught, examined and graded differently so it's pointless comparing them. Just go into them with an open mind, try hard and study often...you'll be fine

    (Original post by tianshan)
    I'm starting my A Levels next academic year. The subjects I've applied for are Biology, Psychology and Mathematics (Mechanics). Could anyone give me an idea of how hard A Levels are? So, if GCSEs were 1 on a scale of 1 to 10, what would A Levels be?

    Cheers!
    A levels are exactly what you make of them. They're obviously harder than GCSEs as they're 'Advanced', so it would be silly to try and compare them. They're going to be hard no matter what subjects you take, but if you go in with the right mindset and are prepared to work hard then you should be just great
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    (Original post by tianshan)
    I'm starting my A Levels next academic year. The subjects I've applied for are Biology, Psychology and Mathematics (Mechanics). Could anyone give me an idea of how hard A Levels are? So, if GCSEs were 1 on a scale of 1 to 10, what would A Levels be?

    Cheers!
    Biology isn't that much different to GCSE conceptually, however the volume of content is at least 10x. There's more detail needed and less memory, so you have to understand and apply rather than regurgitate for the exam. I found AS maths easier than GCSE however this is probably due to putting more work in. Mechanics isn't too bad if you work hard, but as you aren't doing physics you'll likely have to spend more time on it. Good Luck
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    (Original post by Uni12345678)
    Okay, good question. Here's my personal opinion.
    I'd say each a level is almost twice or even thrice as difficult as the GCSE. However, since you're only doing 3 subjects, then as a whole, I think all of them together are equivalent to about 7 or 8 GCSEs, so it never quite feels like a lot, personally. I think people say they are a LOT more difficult just to make sure that people actually study for these, unlike GCSES which many achieve top grades for without a great deal of work.

    But in all honesty, you definitely NEED to study for tests at A level, but you could possibly get away with it for GCSE. the reason for this is because A level is in a lot of depth and if you understand it straight away, you still need to go home, learn it properly, and keep at it or you'll forget it.

    Your subjects are quite difficult. From your options I do bio and maths and if you've done further maths GCSE, then maths is very simple, especially C1, and C2 is just a little harder but you'll be fine. C3 and C4 are difficult but they're the year after next. S1 is the unit I did and it is difficult because you need to be very thorough. M1, from what I've heard is ok, it's got easy concepts applied in a difficult context, and it's more difficult than mechanics qs on the physics AS, if that is useful.
    Biology is actually fine, but again, you NEED to study or you'll forget, as it's got a lot of difficult terms and definitions and processes to remember, although it is extremely interesting and exam papers nowadays generally have a lot of applied information so you've got the opportunity to really show off how your own mind works.

    On a scale of 1 to 10... As a whole, probably 3 or 4 because few subjects and your mind remains focused on them. Per subject, probably like 7 or 8 because there's a lot of information that you can't go without studying.

    Hope this information helps,
    I wish you all the best next year!

    ☺️☺️☺️
    Thanks for your info, Uni. You've been very helpful
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    Overall, I'd say I had a much more pleasant experience doing my A Levels. Yes, the work is substantially more difficult but on the other hand, all of the subjects you're taking are subjects you chose to take and you can specialise a lot more so I personally found them a lot more tolerable.
 
 
 
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