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    Hello everyone!

    I am international student, but I am bilingual. By going to uni in the UK I am aiming to take my English to the next level. So which course, in your view, is more conducive to that end? English literature or linguistics?
    Thanks a lot
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    I can weigh up the pros and cons for you if you like?

    English Literature
    Pros: you'll be exposed to a wide range of literature from the 1300s up until modern day; the course will allow you to have a deeper understanding of the different uses of English and how, say, grammar has changed over time from the syntactical structure of Milton compared to JK Rowling; a great subject if you enjoy reading; very evaluative, looking at the different influences upon a text; you'll learn a lot of new vocabulary AND will be able to see how the English language works in different ways, so you'll be able to speak English in a more considered and sophisticated manner; learning about lots of books will make you sound very interesting!
    Cons: if your English is weak (which I'm very sure it's not, but bear in mind anyway), reading some of the more complicated texts may be a struggle - find a copy of John Milton's Paradise Lost and see how you find reading it? I'm 17 and I really struggled to get the gist of what he was trying to say; you'll encounter lots of unfamiliar vocabulary so if you're up for a challenge I'd recommend it; the subject won't give you any understanding of grammar/syntax 'rules', but you'll see how some people use it - no direct teaching of language.

    Linguistics
    Pros: you're bilingual, so that will be immensely helpful for the course when you look at other languages - what language do you speak? I wish I was bilingual!; there's a fair amount of studying on syntax (sentence structure) and grammar, and whilst the course is descriptivist (they look at the way people use grammar rather than saying NO you must all speak in the way they did in the 1800s!) so you won't be taught how grammar works, you'll gain an incredible insight into morphology (how the different parts of words fit together - the morphology of 'words' is 'word' and '-s' for example) and it'll definitely help your language learning; a lot of the content might actually be very relevant to you - there's a focus on child bilingualism, how we learn a new language, where in the brain language is 'stored' and all those kinds of things which you may enjoy!
    Cons: you won't be reading many books (although some courses may look at the language of poetry, for example) so you won't see language in written usage much; grammar isn't necessarily taught, but you will get a hang of it because you'll have to know how grammar properly works in order to spot when it's being used "wrong"; the subject borders a number of other subjects (Biology, Psychology, Sociology, Literature, English Language, Foreign Languages etc) so if you want a more isolated degree you'd be better off with Literature.

    Bear in mind that Linguistics is very scientific, whereas Literature is much more humanities based. Hope this helps!
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    You could combine them both and do English literature and linguistics.
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    (Original post by Nonoto)
    Hello everyone!

    I am international student, but I am bilingual. By going to uni in the UK I am aiming to take my English to the next level. So which course, in your view, is more conducive to that end? English literature or linguistics?
    Thanks a lot
    Are you saying you wish to study English at degree level, or are you asking which English you want to study, in order to improve your application process to uni?
 
 
 
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