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    Ok, so I've wanted to study medicine for the past 2 years or so. I have just come back from medical work experience abroad and I didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would- the only experience that made me feel a spark of passion was observing surgery. However, I want to have a family and understand that entering surgery, for a female doctor, can be quite tricky. My a level results come out next month and I think I have achieved AAA- AAB, but I can't know for sure. I worked as hard as I possibly could, but feel they could have done better. I don't really want to try GEM if I don't get the grades next month either. So I'm considering doing a degree in neuroscience after my gap year (this year). However, my family are really encouraging about medicine and would be a bit disappointed if I did neuroscience (because what can I actually do with my life after the degree is over??).

    So basically I'm in a bit of mess. I think I want to be a doctor, but then I also want to live a happy and free life. I probably feel this way just because of nerves in relation to results day

    So, does doing a science degree other than medicine make me less likely to succeed in life/ have a job I love??
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    Of course not, there are successful people in other fields beside medicine. There are people that are an inspiration to me - are not even involved in medicine. Example 1: Alan Turing.
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    if you can't do undergrad medicine, do a different degree and then apply for postgrad medicine
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    (Original post by shawn_o1)
    if you can't do undergrad medicine, do a different degree and then apply for postgrad medicine
    But it's so long and expensive, I'm not even sure medicine is for me 😥
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    Not at all, you don't seem that interested in Medicine, rather becoming a doctor and not letting your parents down seems to be what motivates you. I say study what you actually enjoy, then you'll have a better chance of excelling at it.
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    Nope!
    Do what you want to do, not what others want you to do
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    only if your parents are Asian.
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    (Original post by Lularose83)
    Ok, so I've wanted to study medicine for the past 2 years or so. I have just come back from medical work experience abroad and I didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would- the only experience that made me feel a spark of passion was observing surgery. However, I want to have a family and understand that entering surgery, for a female doctor, can be quite tricky. My a level results come out next month and I think I have achieved AAA- AAB, but I can't know for sure. I worked as hard as I possibly could, but feel they could have done better. I don't really want to try GEM if I don't get the grades next month either. So I'm considering doing a degree in neuroscience after my gap year (this year). However, my family are really encouraging about medicine and would be a bit disappointed if I did neuroscience (because what can I actually do with my life after the degree is over??).

    So basically I'm in a bit of mess. I think I want to be a doctor, but then I also want to live a happy and free life. I probably feel this way just because of nerves in relation to results day

    So, does doing a science degree other than medicine make me less likely to succeed in life/ have a job I love??
    If you didn't enjoy it (I know you said you liked surgery but it is a field you seem to be unlikely to want to go into) then don't do it because medicine is a long, hard career path and it would be much more worthwhile doing something you love. It doesn't matter what your family think because it's you who will be the one working for the next 40 or so years.

    To answer your question, no, of course not. There are 1000s of things to do other than medicine.
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    There is a new healthcare role known as a 'PHYSICIAN ASSOCIATE' in the UK, also known as a PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT in the US where it originates from and established. You get to practice medicine under the supervision of a doctor, but with time the supervisory role fades as you get more confident.
    To be one, after your Neuroscience degree, you get to do a 2 year postgraduate diploma or masters, then gain your certification. For more info visit: http://www.fparcp.co.uk/ .
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    No! Do what you want to do. Life is too short not to live authentically. I really would not recommend the GEM route so unless you're certain about undergrad Med, then no - this isn't the correct path for you, and no that doesn't mean you can't be successful at something else. There are millions of people who aren't Drs who are wildly successful and enjoy their lives - being a Dr isn't the ultimate career, it's only the ultimate career if you actually passionately want to be a doctor.
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    Also, being a physician associate you get to have a flexible career, with minimum working hours of 37.5.
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    (Original post by Lularose83)
    Ok, so I've wanted to study medicine for the past 2 years or so. I have just come back from medical work experience abroad and I didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would- the only experience that made me feel a spark of passion was observing surgery. However, I want to have a family and understand that entering surgery, for a female doctor, can be quite tricky. My a level results come out next month and I think I have achieved AAA- AAB, but I can't know for sure. I worked as hard as I possibly could, but feel they could have done better. I don't really want to try GEM if I don't get the grades next month either. So I'm considering doing a degree in neuroscience after my gap year (this year). However, my family are really encouraging about medicine and would be a bit disappointed if I did neuroscience (because what can I actually do with my life after the degree is over??).

    So basically I'm in a bit of mess. I think I want to be a doctor, but then I also want to live a happy and free life. I probably feel this way just because of nerves in relation to results day

    So, does doing a science degree other than medicine make me less likely to succeed in life/ have a job I love??
    1. There is a new healthcare role known as a 'PHYSICIAN ASSOCIATE' in the UK, also known as a PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT in the US where it originates from and established. You get to practice medicine under the supervision of a doctor, but with time the supervisory role fades as you get more confident.
      To be one, after your Neuroscience degree, you get to do a 2 year postgraduate diploma or masters, then gain your certification. For more info visit: http://www.fparcp.co.uk/ .
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    (Original post by Lularose83)
    Ok, so I've wanted to study medicine for the past 2 years or so. I have just come back from medical work experience abroad and I didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would- the only experience that made me feel a spark of passion was observing surgery. However, I want to have a family and understand that entering surgery, for a female doctor, can be quite tricky. My a level results come out next month and I think I have achieved AAA- AAB, but I can't know for sure. I worked as hard as I possibly could, but feel they could have done better. I don't really want to try GEM if I don't get the grades next month either. So I'm considering doing a degree in neuroscience after my gap year (this year). However, my family are really encouraging about medicine and would be a bit disappointed if I did neuroscience (because what can I actually do with my life after the degree is over??).

    So basically I'm in a bit of mess. I think I want to be a doctor, but then I also want to live a happy and free life. I probably feel this way just because of nerves in relation to results day

    So, does doing a science degree other than medicine make me less likely to succeed in life/ have a job I love??
    The vibe I'm getting from your post is that you don't really seem to like the idea of doing a medical degree or being a doctor - which is absolutely fine. That's the whole point of doing work experience: to see if the actual job (not how it's portrayed on Grey's Anatomy) is for you or not.

    Your family need to realise that neuroscience is a difficult and highly respected field of science. In terms of what you can do with it, you would have a lot of options. You could apply to the standard workplace grad schemes in your final year and enter the world of work. Or you could do a PGCE and go into teaching. Or if you want to carry on in science you could do a masters degree and PhD, and work as a lab researcher. Sticking with just the BSc won't give you many options in the world of science, but sticking with just an MB ChB won't get you far in medicine either. If you want to get to higher positions (whether as a surgeon or as a scientist) you need to do further study and gain further qualifications.

    I don't think any sensible person would look down on someone with a PhD in neuroscience. Just because you wouldn't have a medical degree and wouldn't work with patients doesn't meant that your research isn't important or worthwhile. The work which lab scientists do is all part of the collaborative effort which leads to changes and improvements in clinical medicine.

    Personally I would go with your gut instinct - neuroscience is a fine degree and you'd have three years to consider your options a bit more. There's no need to plan your entire career right now!
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    (Original post by Lularose83)
    Ok, so I've wanted to study medicine for the past 2 years or so. I have just come back from medical work experience abroad and I didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would- the only experience that made me feel a spark of passion was observing surgery. However, I want to have a family and understand that entering surgery, for a female doctor, can be quite tricky. My a level results come out next month and I think I have achieved AAA- AAB, but I can't know for sure. I worked as hard as I possibly could, but feel they could have done better. I don't really want to try GEM if I don't get the grades next month either. So I'm considering doing a degree in neuroscience after my gap year (this year). However, my family are really encouraging about medicine and would be a bit disappointed if I did neuroscience (because what can I actually do with my life after the degree is over??).

    So basically I'm in a bit of mess. I think I want to be a doctor, but then I also want to live a happy and free life. I probably feel this way just because of nerves in relation to results day

    So, does doing a science degree other than medicine make me less likely to succeed in life/ have a job I love??
    Believe it or not, you can be a doctor and live a happy/free life!

    If you enjoyed surgery, then great. Become a surgeon. I know many budding surgeons who can't stand medical life but appreciate that it's a means to an end and happily get on with it.

    Being female should in no way preclude you to becoming a surgeon.

    All in all, it's healthy to have doubts. I suggest waiting for your results. If you really can't stomach the idea of being a doctor, then don't. If you can't deal with the uncertainty, take a gap year.

    (Original post by jerrymens)
    There is a new healthcare role known as a 'PHYSICIAN ASSOCIATE' in the UK, also known as a PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT in the US where it originates from and established. You get to practice medicine under the supervision of a doctor, but with time the supervisory role fades as you get more confident.To be one, after your Neuroscience degree, you get to do a 2 year postgraduate diploma or masters, then gain your certification. For more info visit: http://www.fparcp.co.uk/ .
    I don't see how becoming a noctor is a solution to this problem.
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    I don't see how becoming a noctor is a solution to this problem.[/QUOTE]

    If you knew about this amazing profession: Physician associate not 'noctor' and how suitable it is to OP, you would understand.
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    (Original post by jerrymens)
    If you knew about this amazing profession: Physician associate not 'noctor' and how suitable it is to OP, you would understand.
    Feel free to elaborate.
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    (Original post by Lularose83)
    Ok, so I've wanted to study medicine for the past 2 years or so. I have just come back from medical work experience abroad and I didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would- the only experience that made me feel a spark of passion was observing surgery. However, I want to have a family and understand that entering surgery, for a female doctor, can be quite tricky. My a level results come out next month and I think I have achieved AAA- AAB, but I can't know for sure. I worked as hard as I possibly could, but feel they could have done better. I don't really want to try GEM if I don't get the grades next month either. So I'm considering doing a degree in neuroscience after my gap year (this year). However, my family are really encouraging about medicine and would be a bit disappointed if I did neuroscience (because what can I actually do with my life after the degree is over??).

    So basically I'm in a bit of mess. I think I want to be a doctor, but then I also want to live a happy and free life. I probably feel this way just because of nerves in relation to results day

    So, does doing a science degree other than medicine make me less likely to succeed in life/ have a job I love??
    Lol there are other careers out there calm yourself.

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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    Feel free to elaborate.
    http://www.fparcp.co.uk/ Just go on there and you would get all the beneficial information you need.
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    (Original post by Lularose83)

    So, does doing a science degree other than medicine make me less likely to succeed in life/ have a job I love??
    Do the degree that you think that you will enjoy very much, if you don't think that medicine is the right degree for you, then it is very likely that any exams you do in medicine will get you bad results, it's your life, speak to your family about it and express how you feel, they will understand you and have to support you for whatever you choose to study. if you don't want to do something less challenging compared to medicine then try biochemistry, it is very similar and still very hard compared to other degrees, (excluding medicine ) or pharmacology, or biology, or chemistry or physics. Any degree in the sciences will open any job you want AAANNNYYYY. And successfulness depends on how you define it for example, you are successful if you have a home and a degree in the science, and have a family or you are successful if you have a Ph.D. etc
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    Yup Barack Obama is a failure, Albert Einstein was a failure, Lionel Messi is a failure, JK Rowling is a failure, Leonardo DiCaprio is a failure. Only successful people in the world are doctors.

    I'm going to stereotypically assume you come from an asian family, in which case I really don't understand this mindset that I see all the time. Really quite ignorant to other people who either aren't clever enough to do it, or who are and just never wanted to. At my last uni the medics were always so snobby and looked down on everyone, and everyone at the uni had achieved at least A*A*A in their A-Levels. You should study whatever you want to do and not be pressured into something by your family/culture/society. I don't even see why medicine is apparently so much higher regarded anyway to the point it's the only option. There's many other well regarded degrees (law, engineering, physics...). Just do whatever you are interested in
 
 
 
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