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    Ive got all my GCSE exams next year and I don't have a clue on how to revise properly? I have purchased revision guides already but they have just sat on a shelf
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    What subjects are you taking?
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    (Original post by 5audade)
    What subjects are you taking?
    Business and communications
    History
    Graphics
    Computing
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    Well I didn't take those subjects at GCSE. I took history and then dropped it two months before the exam. I found that the best way to revise for my exams was either to make mind maps, watch YouTube videos or write facts down over and over until I remembered them. Staring at a revision guide didn't help me. Could always look up and try to complete past papers, but if your school is anything like mine they'll throw one at you every week. Try out different revision techniques to see which one works for you.
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    Write things over and over again. Mind maps, pictures, different colours. Make sure that every time you write it, you write it a little differently - like Chinese Whispers, but make sure the point remains true. Rewriting things in different ways helps you to make sure you understand the points.
    Flash cards are also good - so write a question on one side of a card and the answer on the other - test yourself.

    If you have a lot of short descriptions you need to remember, I like to use "look, cover, write, check". You probably did this in primary school; basically you have the description in the left hand side and then the word in the next column. First, you look at the descriptions and the words, then you cover the words and try to write them in the next column from the descriptions. After this you can check them. It helps you to realise what you need to work on.
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    (Original post by Jack_Tomlin)
    Business and communications
    History
    Graphics
    Computing
    Wait, you're taking 4 subjects? Aren't you supposed to take at least 8? Anyway, I did O Levels but they're pretty similar to GCSEs so here are my two cents.

    Firstly, it's great that you're already thinking about your GCSEs. Most people don't until 2-3 months before the actual exams. What I did for my O Levels was read the textbooks from start to finish thoroughly. Revision guides are great for last-minute preparation in the weeks leading up to the exam, but right now I think it'll be best for you to read the textbooks so you get a very strong grasp on all the concepts.

    Also, past papers are extremely important. Go through as many as possible. You don't necessarily need to do them practically, just read them along with the mark schemes. This way you can do a ton of past papers in a short amount of time. But do at least a few on paper with a timer, so you understand how to manage your time during the exam.

    Hit me up if you have any more questions. Also, take all advice with a grain of salt because at the end of the day you are unique and the techniques that work for other people might not work for you. Keep trying to figure out the most effective way that YOU learn.
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    I done my GCSES this year. I found making flashcards earlier on (christmas time) was definitely a big help. I used the website - GoConqr - for this.
    I also made summary pages from my revision books and from my books from class. However I found it better to do this later on, perhaps a couple of days before the exam.
    For history I made my own timelines, but in the form of a mindmap, by splitting the page into sections, a section for each year. I then shaded each section either red, yellow or green, depending what relationships were like during that time period, though you will need to change this depending on your style of exam, and the main focus of your exams.
    Finally, make sure you do all of the past papers you can, and then mark it harshly, and note down everything you lost marks on, and revise that more thoroughly.
    I will be starting my a levels this year, and so I will be making flashcards and summary pages after each lesson (I say this, but I probably won't stick to it!) So, if you haven't finished any of the content yet, I suggest doing that whilst you can, it will make revision much easier!!

    Good luck with year 11, and remember, don't get too stressed, because I did, and I made myself ill because of the stress, it is definitely not worth it!!
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    Practice papers are the best way to get good marks! Get used to answering questions in a way that will get you the most marks possible. Take advantage of any extra lessons your teachers may put on for you.
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    Start memorising them and apply your learning on past papers.
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    yeah buying revision guides and knowing the techniques wont magically make you revise. the way to revise is setting a goal and knowing what you want. what you want is to remember the information on the spec. what you want is to be able to use those information on a past paper. you dont want to revise for the sake of revision :P
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    (Original post by Jack_Tomlin)
    Ive got all my GCSE exams next year and I don't have a clue on how to revise properly? I have purchased revision guides already but they have just sat on a shelf
    Which subjects? For most of them you shouldn't even need to do past papers just read through the revision guides for A grades
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    Start off the school year by taking down as much notes as possible in class. Make sure they're clear and readable, they don't have to be colourful or highlighted at this point but you can if you want to.
    Next start attending revision sessions as soon as they are put on. Some of your sessions will clash, so either alternate it between weeks (this week I'll go to Computing next week I'll go History) or work it out logically e.g. if there are two History sessions a week and only one Computing, go to one Computing and one History if the two clash. At this point you want to start putting those gel pens at the bottom of your Christmas stocking to good use now, as colour, especially bright ones, helps you remember it more. Bring chewing gum along too, don't make it obvious if you're not allowed it but surprisingly chewing gum helps with your memory (found out on a Matthew Santaro video). If you're a focused pupil sit with your friends wherever you want and take down your notes, but if you're easily distracted, try sit nearer the front away from your chatty classmates.
    There are lots of revision techniques out there so let me run you through them:
    ~Flash cards are highly recommended. Start making these as soon as you can otherwise you won't be able to finish them. These are especially good for Science, Geography, History and ICT, although they work in most subjects. I would suggest making your own instead of printing them off online because you learn it better writing the information down than seeing it and also some online flash cards are inaccurate to your specific course. I would recommend using coloured card using different colour pens. If you want to write on the back, avoid sharpies. Also use a highlighter to highlight key information.
    ~Mind maps I would recommend for key words in subjects like English, Languages and Business Studies. Select sub-topics and make a map about all the key words/key information you need to know about it. E.g. in Business, pick the sub subject Marketing, and write important details about the Product Life Cycle, Boston Matrix, Branding etc. If you have blu-tack, hang these up on your bedroom wall and around the house (with permission from your parents!) so that you remember it. These are good to do at the start of the GCSE process but also is a really useful as a quick revision tool before an exam.
    ~Youtube videos are a great newer tool to help with exams. It's important to pick a youtube channel(s) that works for you, if you hate the guys voice you're not going to take the information in. Pausing to take down quick notes is suggested but not necessary. These are best towards the middle end of your exams on topics that you particularly struggle on. (Make sure it is the right exam board and year).
    ~Websites is another newer tool which is helpful as it has all the information you need. However, finding the right website is the most horrible experience so you need to find one early on. Do not copy the information word for word or print it. Instead, try and write it in your own words so you understand it and take it in. Website Recommendations:
    1.) http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/levels/z98jmp3 - Of course I would recommend this gem of a site. They also have an app now which has flash cards for your revision before the exam.
    2.) https://mathswebsite.com/ - There are lots of good maths websites e.g. my maths and Manga High but this one is my favourite. Don't let the ironic name trick you, Hegarty Maths is a very useful website. It has access to all past papers for different exam boards and mark schemes, lessons on there and separate exam papers for different maths subjects e.g. Pie charts. The best feature is it has youtube videos talking you through every question you do in your past paper packs, and it splits it up so if you found question 3 easy you can skip it and watch how to do question 4.
    3.) http://www.coolgeography.co.uk/ - I know you're not taking Geography but for your friends when you can't find it on bitesize look here!
    I didn't rely on many websites because inaccuracies.
    ~Textbooks are good if you can afford 11+ books. They can also include a phone app which you can download too. I would recommend the CPG guides if you're doing AQA and edexcel for edexcel. AQA textbooks are a bit poop, but AQA CPG guides got so many of my friends through GCSEs. Like with websites, write notes down in your own words from the books. Also, after a revision session, read the topics your teacher has gone over so they sink in.
    ~Past Papers I left until last but these are the most important. You can usually get them from your teachers or your school website. If not, check your exam boards website. They'll have some there too. Start past papers after the notes process, usually happens between February half term and Easter when people start. MAKE SURE YOU TIME YOURSELF especially for English Language. You will run out of time in the actual exam otherwise. You can go sub section by sub section or just paper by paper. If you do not come across a question in the past papers e.g. Pie charts, either research questions on it or get your teacher to design some questions. If they decline, go to your Head of that subject and ask them. They will do it as well as giving that lazy teacher a kick up the backside.

    And that's all I can think of right now. Don't leave it to last minute, but don't forget your family and friends. Your friends are going through what you are and know how you feel. And your family (majority of the time) are behind you. Hope this helps this was so long to write
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    Thanks for taking the time to write this I will defiantly try these techniques! 🙂
    (Original post by ExoIceCream99)
    Start off the school year by taking down as much notes as possible in class. Make sure they're clear and readable, they don't have to be colourful or highlighted at this point but you can if you want to.
    Next start attending revision sessions as soon as they are put on. Some of your sessions will clash, so either alternate it between weeks (this week I'll go to Computing next week I'll go History) or work it out logically e.g. if there are two History sessions a week and only one Computing, go to one Computing and one History if the two clash. At this point you want to start putting those gel pens at the bottom of your Christmas stocking to good use now, as colour, especially bright ones, helps you remember it more. Bring chewing gum along too, don't make it obvious if you're not allowed it but surprisingly chewing gum helps with your memory (found out on a Matthew Santaro video). If you're a focused pupil sit with your friends wherever you want and take down your notes, but if you're easily distracted, try sit nearer the front away from your chatty classmates.
    There are lots of revision techniques out there so let me run you through them:
    ~Flash cards are highly recommended. Start making these as soon as you can otherwise you won't be able to finish them. These are especially good for Science, Geography, History and ICT, although they work in most subjects. I would suggest making your own instead of printing them off online because you learn it better writing the information down than seeing it and also some online flash cards are inaccurate to your specific course. I would recommend using coloured card using different colour pens. If you want to write on the back, avoid sharpies. Also use a highlighter to highlight key information.
    ~Mind maps I would recommend for key words in subjects like English, Languages and Business Studies. Select sub-topics and make a map about all the key words/key information you need to know about it. E.g. in Business, pick the sub subject Marketing, and write important details about the Product Life Cycle, Boston Matrix, Branding etc. If you have blu-tack, hang these up on your bedroom wall and around the house (with permission from your parents!) so that you remember it. These are good to do at the start of the GCSE process but also is a really useful as a quick revision tool before an exam.
    ~Youtube videos are a great newer tool to help with exams. It's important to pick a youtube channel(s) that works for you, if you hate the guys voice you're not going to take the information in. Pausing to take down quick notes is suggested but not necessary. These are best towards the middle end of your exams on topics that you particularly struggle on. (Make sure it is the right exam board and year).
    ~Websites is another newer tool which is helpful as it has all the information you need. However, finding the right website is the most horrible experience so you need to find one early on. Do not copy the information word for word or print it. Instead, try and write it in your own words so you understand it and take it in. Website Recommendations:
    1.) http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/levels/z98jmp3 - Of course I would recommend this gem of a site. They also have an app now which has flash cards for your revision before the exam.
    2.) https://mathswebsite.com/ - There are lots of good maths websites e.g. my maths and Manga High but this one is my favourite. Don't let the ironic name trick you, Hegarty Maths is a very useful website. It has access to all past papers for different exam boards and mark schemes, lessons on there and separate exam papers for different maths subjects e.g. Pie charts. The best feature is it has youtube videos talking you through every question you do in your past paper packs, and it splits it up so if you found question 3 easy you can skip it and watch how to do question 4.
    3.) http://www.coolgeography.co.uk/ - I know you're not taking Geography but for your friends when you can't find it on bitesize look here!
    I didn't rely on many websites because inaccuracies.
    ~Textbooks are good if you can afford 11+ books. They can also include a phone app which you can download too. I would recommend the CPG guides if you're doing AQA and edexcel for edexcel. AQA textbooks are a bit poop, but AQA CPG guides got so many of my friends through GCSEs. Like with websites, write notes down in your own words from the books. Also, after a revision session, read the topics your teacher has gone over so they sink in.
    ~Past Papers I left until last but these are the most important. You can usually get them from your teachers or your school website. If not, check your exam boards website. They'll have some there too. Start past papers after the notes process, usually happens between February half term and Easter when people start. MAKE SURE YOU TIME YOURSELF especially for English Language. You will run out of time in the actual exam otherwise. You can go sub section by sub section or just paper by paper. If you do not come across a question in the past papers e.g. Pie charts, either research questions on it or get your teacher to design some questions. If they decline, go to your Head of that subject and ask them. They will do it as well as giving that lazy teacher a kick up the backside.

    And that's all I can think of right now. Don't leave it to last minute, but don't forget your family and friends. Your friends are going through what you are and know how you feel. And your family (majority of the time) are behind you. Hope this helps this was so long to write
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    I did GCSE about 2 years ago now
    The only effective way I found wa continuously doing past papers over and over again and memorising the types of questions they will ask
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    For the flash cards what could I put on them as its hard to combine one whole topic onto one card? Say for example for science what could I write on a card for say the topic plant hormones
    (Original post by ExoIceCream99)
    Start off the school year by taking down as much notes as possible in class. Make sure they're clear and readable, they don't have to be colourful or highlighted at this point but you can if you want to.
    Next start attending revision sessions as soon as they are put on. Some of your sessions will clash, so either alternate it between weeks (this week I'll go to Computing next week I'll go History) or work it out logically e.g. if there are two History sessions a week and only one Computing, go to one Computing and one History if the two clash. At this point you want to start putting those gel pens at the bottom of your Christmas stocking to good use now, as colour, especially bright ones, helps you remember it more. Bring chewing gum along too, don't make it obvious if you're not allowed it but surprisingly chewing gum helps with your memory (found out on a Matthew Santaro video). If you're a focused pupil sit with your friends wherever you want and take down your notes, but if you're easily distracted, try sit nearer the front away from your chatty classmates.
    There are lots of revision techniques out there so let me run you through them:
    ~Flash cards are highly recommended. Start making these as soon as you can otherwise you won't be able to finish them. These are especially good for Science, Geography, History and ICT, although they work in most subjects. I would suggest making your own instead of printing them off online because you learn it better writing the information down than seeing it and also some online flash cards are inaccurate to your specific course. I would recommend using coloured card using different colour pens. If you want to write on the back, avoid sharpies. Also use a highlighter to highlight key information.
    ~Mind maps I would recommend for key words in subjects like English, Languages and Business Studies. Select sub-topics and make a map about all the key words/key information you need to know about it. E.g. in Business, pick the sub subject Marketing, and write important details about the Product Life Cycle, Boston Matrix, Branding etc. If you have blu-tack, hang these up on your bedroom wall and around the house (with permission from your parents!) so that you remember it. These are good to do at the start of the GCSE process but also is a really useful as a quick revision tool before an exam.
    ~Youtube videos are a great newer tool to help with exams. It's important to pick a youtube channel(s) that works for you, if you hate the guys voice you're not going to take the information in. Pausing to take down quick notes is suggested but not necessary. These are best towards the middle end of your exams on topics that you particularly struggle on. (Make sure it is the right exam board and year).
    ~Websites is another newer tool which is helpful as it has all the information you need. However, finding the right website is the most horrible experience so you need to find one early on. Do not copy the information word for word or print it. Instead, try and write it in your own words so you understand it and take it in. Website Recommendations:
    1.) http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/levels/z98jmp3 - Of course I would recommend this gem of a site. They also have an app now which has flash cards for your revision before the exam.
    2.) https://mathswebsite.com/ - There are lots of good maths websites e.g. my maths and Manga High but this one is my favourite. Don't let the ironic name trick you, Hegarty Maths is a very useful website. It has access to all past papers for different exam boards and mark schemes, lessons on there and separate exam papers for different maths subjects e.g. Pie charts. The best feature is it has youtube videos talking you through every question you do in your past paper packs, and it splits it up so if you found question 3 easy you can skip it and watch how to do question 4.
    3.) http://www.coolgeography.co.uk/ - I know you're not taking Geography but for your friends when you can't find it on bitesize look here!
    I didn't rely on many websites because inaccuracies.
    ~Textbooks are good if you can afford 11+ books. They can also include a phone app which you can download too. I would recommend the CPG guides if you're doing AQA and edexcel for edexcel. AQA textbooks are a bit poop, but AQA CPG guides got so many of my friends through GCSEs. Like with websites, write notes down in your own words from the books. Also, after a revision session, read the topics your teacher has gone over so they sink in.
    ~Past Papers I left until last but these are the most important. You can usually get them from your teachers or your school website. If not, check your exam boards website. They'll have some there too. Start past papers after the notes process, usually happens between February half term and Easter when people start. MAKE SURE YOU TIME YOURSELF especially for English Language. You will run out of time in the actual exam otherwise. You can go sub section by sub section or just paper by paper. If you do not come across a question in the past papers e.g. Pie charts, either research questions on it or get your teacher to design some questions. If they decline, go to your Head of that subject and ask them. They will do it as well as giving that lazy teacher a kick up the backside.

    And that's all I can think of right now. Don't leave it to last minute, but don't forget your family and friends. Your friends are going through what you are and know how you feel. And your family (majority of the time) are behind you. Hope this helps this was so long to write
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    What I did was go through my text book and do a card for each page. There are two ways to do this. You could either do questions on one side and answers on the other, testing you or your friends, or ask a parent or sibling to test you. E.g. Name a plant Hormone. Answer: Auxin. List 3 other hormones. Answer: FSH, LH and Insulin (when doing 6 markers this way make sure you bullet point it on the cards or you won't remember it.) Option 2 is go through your textbook page by page and do notes on those topics. E.g. if you were doing the Keeping Healthy Topic, you could draw a food plate, label it, and put on their what you use things for e.g. fats for energy. This should be colourful and concise, not too much information on each one. Hope this helps
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    (Original post by Jack_Tomlin)
    Ive got all my GCSE exams next year and I don't have a clue on how to revise properly? I have purchased revision guides already but they have just sat on a shelf
    Prepare notes and/or watch videos to ensure that you know the content. Then test your knowledge with past papers and mark them. Afterwards, do gap analysis on the weaker topics by ensuring you re-learn the content in that specific topic. You can make notes by using your revision guides, don't let them sit on the shelf.

    Also join the Current Y10 thread here: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...php?t=3508493A new Y11 will be out soon and I'll try to tag all to it.
 
 
 
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