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    What do you think of them? Do you think enrolling on one at 16 is the right choice? Or 18? Or in your 20s?

    Should high achievers consider this option or just focus on college?

    And what industries is it right/wrong for?


    Love to hear your views
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    It entirely depends on the career you've chosen. In some, it'll pay and get your foot on the ladder quicker than going to college ever could, such as mechanics and so on.
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    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    It entirely depends on the career you've chosen. In some, it'll pay and get your foot on the ladder quicker than going to college ever could, such as mechanics and so on.
    Okay, so what would you say about, let's say, Engineering as a career?
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    Yeah. They do have a negative stigma about them.

    But IDGAF. I don't think I can do another three years of study in Uni. So it's the right call for me..
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    It depends if you'll actually be learning a useful skill or if it's just a minimum wage job for less money.
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    Not sure why there is a negative stigma? Such people are idiots.

    Theres a great variation in apprenticeships, poor ones are dead end cheap labour, but some of the good ones offer training, a salary and invaluable experience that many graduates will find difficult to replicate.
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    I'm not so sure that they do have a stigma. Perhaps in those circles where they have an over-inflated opinion of ther own superiority but not amongst ordinary people. One of my brothers is a joiner. His skills are well sought after and he makes enough money to have got onto the property ladder by the time he was 24 without handouts from anyone. Who's the daftie - him or those graduates who are saddled with debt and in a job that pays peanuts?
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    There's a stigma that is encouraged implicitly by the schools/elites/government, to continue the scam that is 80% of university degrees.
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    (Original post by richpanda)
    There's a stigma that is encouraged implicitly by the schools/elites/government, to continue the scam that is 80% of university degrees.
    Agreed. Everyone at schools I've been too always prepare you for Uni and barely mention the option of Apprenticeships
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    I don't really think there is a stigma against apprenticeships anymore. In fact, more people than ever are enrolling in apprenticeships as they are a more economically viable path for younger people. You get 'hands on experience' in a desired working environment, potentially a job at your apprenticeship company and a paid university course following one or two years in industry. What's not to love?
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    (Original post by umar39)
    I don't really think there is a stigma against apprenticeships anymore. In fact, more people than ever are enrolling in apprenticeships as they are a more economically viable path for younger people. You get 'hands on experience' in a desired working environment, potentially a job at your apprenticeship company and a paid university course following one or two years in industry. What's not to love?
    Yep - sounds pretty good to me. Do you think schools do enough to show them in a positive light?
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    (Original post by brainzistheword)
    Yep - sounds pretty good to me. Do you think schools do enough to show them in a positive light?
    I can't assume for the whole country but at my secondary school, we are told to consider an apprenticeship. There are trips to businesses that offer apprenticeships so students can ask questions directly to employers/employees giving the student a better insight into what to expect from an apprenticeship. So, yes, I do kind of think they are shown in a good light particularly if you mention the experience in industry and paid university course yet, the social stigma of an apprenticeship is still there (it's perceived as an option for those who could not get into university which is, of course, rubbish!)
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    (Original post by umar39)
    I can't assume for the whole country but at my secondary school, we are told to consider an apprenticeship. There are trips to businesses that offer apprenticeships so students can ask questions directly to employers/employees giving the student a better insight into what to expect from an apprenticeship. So, yes, I do kind of think they are shown in a good light particularly if you mention the experience in industry and paid university course yet, the social stigma of an apprenticeship is still there (it's perceived as an option for those who could not get into university which is, of course, rubbish!)
    Your school sounds like they did everything mine didn't! Everything was focused around A-levels and prepping for Uni life. But I am really glad to hear that there are schools out there that do promote them.
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    (Original post by brainzistheword)
    Your school sounds like they did everything mine didn't! Everything was focused around A-levels and prepping for Uni life. But I am really glad to hear that there are schools out there that do promote them.
    My school was "do A - Levels, get into your first choice uni, numbers, numbers, numbers!"

    Doing an engineering apprenticeship rather than a degree was the best choice I ever made.
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    (Original post by Donkey******)
    My school was "do A - Levels, get into your first choice uni, numbers, numbers, numbers!"

    Doing an engineering apprenticeship rather than a degree was the best choice I ever made.
    Engineering? That's what I want to do!
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    (Original post by brainzistheword)
    Engineering? That's what I want to do!
    It's actually an easier way in, we take far more apprentices than graduates.
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    (Original post by Donkey******)
    It's actually an easier way in, we take far more apprentices than graduates.
    That's interesting, at the minute I can't decide between an apprenticeship or college, as I am particularly interesting in University study.
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    (Original post by brainzistheword)
    That's interesting, at the minute I can't decide between an apprenticeship or college, as I am particularly interesting in University study.
    To get your degree, you need to have completed A - Levels to enrol on a degree apprenticeship.

    you can go down the advanced route and transfer across, but that's then potentially a 10 year process rather than 8.
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    (Original post by Donkey******)
    To get your degree, you need to have completed A - Levels to enrol on a degree apprenticeship.

    you can go down the advanced route and transfer across, but that's then potentially a 10 year process rather than 8.
    I see. How would the employer look at self-taught A-levels?
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    (Original post by brainzistheword)
    I see. How would the employer look at self-taught A-levels?
    The same as college educated assuming the grades were good enough and in relevant subjects, I would assume. I can't see you getting more merit because it's self taught than someone who studied at college. With most bigger companies, you fill in an online application and if you don't meet the grades, you just don't get through.
 
 
 
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