Debt Collection Agency - What can they do? Watch

AllenW
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Hi,

I was a student studying in the UK not long ago. At first, I was just chugging along my course without much thought, but I realized after awhile that it wasn't what I wanted to do. So I stopped attending my lectures and started doing things that I was actually passionate about. Eventually, I left the UK and went back to my home country.

However, I did not pay a small portion of my fees, as I was no longer there - but the contract was for a full year. By any standards, I've overpaid, but because of their regulations, they're now chasing me for that small portion. They sent me a letter saying that they would pass along the debt to a debt collection agency.

So my question is:
What can the debt collection agency do to you?

(I've done a little searching, and some sources say that they might continously contact you, or add interest to the debt. But at what point exactly can they force you to pay?)
0
reply
Platopus
Badges: 19
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by AllenW)
Hi,

I was a student studying in the UK not long ago. At first, I was just chugging along my course without much thought, but I realized after awhile that it wasn't what I wanted to do. So I stopped attending my lectures and started doing things that I was actually passionate about. Eventually, I left the UK and went back to my home country.

However, I did not pay a small portion of my fees, as I was no longer there - but the contract was for a full year. By any standards, I've overpaid, but because of their regulations, they're now chasing me for that small portion. They sent me a letter saying that they would pass along the debt to a debt collection agency.

So my question is:
What can the debt collection agency do to you?

(I've done a little searching, and some sources say that they might continously contact you, or add interest to the debt. But at what point exactly can they force you to pay?)
If it's only a small portion, just pay it. They could sue you.
reply
AllenW
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by Platopus)
If it's only a small portion, just pay it. They could sue you.
Ok, so there's that possibility. Could you elaborate, as to what sort of steps they would take? And what sort of steps I could take?

To put it into perspective, I've paid over £5,000 for services that I never used. I tried to reclaim it / funnel it to paying the debt, but they simply refused and pointed to the contract.
It's a small portion of the whole year's fees, so it still sums up to quite alot. My creditor is reluctant to pay it, and so am I.
0
reply
domonict
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
they can take you to court, and if you loose, which you will, a court order can be made.

if you ignore a CCJ then bailiffs can be employed, who add costs and interest. they will visit and attempt tp get you to pay, and your credit rating will be seriously affected.

if they chose to escalate, and go to the high court, enforcement officers can remove goods to sell at auction with you paying all the costs
0
reply
Platopus
Badges: 19
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by AllenW)
Ok, so there's that possibility. Could you elaborate, as to what sort of steps they would take? And what sort of steps I could take?

To put it into perspective, I've paid over £5,000 for services that I never used. I tried to reclaim it / funnel it to paying the debt, but they simply refused and pointed to the contract.
It's a small portion of the whole year's fees, so it still sums up to quite alot. My creditor is reluctant to pay it, and so am I.
The below response should provide sufficient elaboration on my point:

(Original post by domonict)
they can take you to court, and if you loose, which you will, a court order can be made.

if you ignore a CCJ then bailiffs can be employed, who add costs and interest. they will visit and attempt tp get you to pay, and your credit rating will be seriously affected.

if they chose to escalate, and go to the high court, enforcement officers can remove goods to sell at auction with you paying all the costs
reply
Klix88
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 years ago
#6
domonict has nailed it for UK residents but things are a bit different as you are overseas now. Any legal action against you will depend on things like whether you're in the EU (for the moment at least...), whether the UK has any kind of reciprocal legal arrangements for this situation with your country of residence etc.*

The situation described by domonict above will mean that you risk being the subject of legal action to recover the debt if you try and enter the UK again. If you try to come in from outside the UK/EU, you would most likely have your application for a visa rejected in the first place for having an outstanding CCJ against you.
0
reply
AllenW
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#7
Thank you Klix, you have most appropriately answered my question

Thank you domonict and Platopus for responding as well
0
reply
Shisui
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 years ago
#8
Domonict forgets that you are NOT a UK citizen and it really depends if you enter the UK again... Your visa will almost automatically be rejected because of the outstanding fees but they will and can do nothing to you where you live. Trust me. They cant do sh*t because youre not a UK citizen
0
reply
tuxyu
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
(Original post by Shisui)
. They cant do sh*t because youre not a UK citizen
You can't possibly pretend to know that, it depends entirely on where they are located.
0
reply
Shisui
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 years ago
#10
Well, we left the EU. A friend of mine from Pakistan came to England on a student visa, he had exceptional circumstances and was quite gifted. After a few incidents, he decided to leave for America... He paid some of his loans but after he left, they just stopped. Sure, they threatened him with emails and said that he would also have to pay for the cost of any people that the agency hired to go find him- but because he wasn't a Uk citizen, there was pretty much nothing they could do.

If hes a Uk citizen, then its a completely different story.
0
reply
Klix88
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 years ago
#11
(Original post by Shisui)
Well, we left the EU.
No we didn't. We're still as much a part of the EU as we were this time last year, and likely to remain so until at least 2020.

We voted in favour of leaving the EU. It hasn't actually happened yet and won't for years.

because he wasn't a Uk citizen, there was pretty much nothing they could do.
He'll be fine as long as he never tries to come back to the UK. It's a big planet.
0
reply
YaliaV
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 years ago
#12
(Original post by AllenW)
Hi,

I was a student studying in the UK not long ago. At first, I was just chugging along my course without much thought, but I realized after awhile that it wasn't what I wanted to do. So I stopped attending my lectures and started doing things that I was actually passionate about. Eventually, I left the UK and went back to my home country.

However, I did not pay a small portion of my fees, as I was no longer there - but the contract was for a full year. By any standards, I've overpaid, but because of their regulations, they're now chasing me for that small portion. They sent me a letter saying that they would pass along the debt to a debt collection agency.

So my question is:
What can the debt collection agency do to you?

(I've done a little searching, and some sources say that they might continously contact you, or add interest to the debt. But at what point exactly can they force you to pay?)
How have you overpaid? You can't just pick and choose the length of the contract based on whether or not you bothered to attend your classes. It sounds like you are bsing on an epic scale and not taking responsibility for your actions.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    All Departments Open 13:00-17:00. Find out more about our diverse range of subject areas and career progression in the Arts & Humanities, Social Sciences, Medicine & Health Sciences, and the Sciences. Postgraduate
    Wed, 30 Jan '19
  • Aston University
    Postgraduate Open Day Postgraduate
    Wed, 30 Jan '19
  • Solent University
    Careers in maritime Undergraduate
    Sat, 2 Feb '19

Brexit: Given the chance now, would you vote leave or remain?

Remain (851)
80.74%
Leave (203)
19.26%

Watched Threads

View All